Skip to main content

Full text of "Radio Electronics (May 1983)"

See other formats


PROTECT YOUR CAR— BUILD AN 
— AUTOMOTIVE BURGLAR ALARM 




DGS 



OMPUTERS - VIDEO - STEREO - TECHNOLOGY - SERVICE 



nf^n"-:- 



ALKING ALARM CLOCK 

nd listen to the time 
ew IC's for 



The time is seven thirty am 

beep... beep.... beep... 

.it's time to get up.... 



uilda 

IF ANTENNA TUNER 

jp youp peceivep 
owto 



rprrTi¥y;7^^iii ; w >;k 



OP custom applications 
iaci(-to-school series: 



\l I ilUilVPlf; w •J^ i > 



ow to design youp own 



1:^ 




"71896"48783' 



05 





For nuts and screws in all the sizes 
you use -and in all the patterns you're 
ever likely to meet (including the new 
Torx" design that's becoming so 
widespread). 

Choose from inches or metric, 
straight -on heads or ballpoints, regular 
or tee. fixed or ratchetting handles. 

Buy individually, in packaged sets, 
or in comprehensive cased kits. 

If you need to drive a nut or screw, 



The COkiper Group PO Bu» 726 Apex NC 27502 USA Tel (919) 362-7510 Telex 57949^ 
BOKER'''CRESCe m-UjnON'^NICHC K.SON'PLJUMB'waj JR'^WISS''x ^ 



^ 



CooDerTools 











Torx* is the trademark of Camcar Division of Textron Incorporated. 
CIRCLE 7 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



SENCORE MODEL SC61 



WAVEFORM ANALYZER 



Double Your Troubleshooting and Testing 
Productivity ... Or Your Money Back! 



Sbt-digi readoirt: Auto- 
mattcally tracks every 
CRT test. We call it 
digital autot racking, 
it's patent pending. 

I 



Bright du^-trace CRT: 

60MHz{-3dB):100 
MHz{-12dB). 



DeHa PPV, Tins, Fret): 

treasure any part of a 
waveform for PPV, 
tirrre or frequency 
using Deita measure- 
menls. Just dial in the 
waveform section 
you want to measure 
and pusti. 



Simplity Freq ratio lasts: 

Automat icaiiy 
canpare input/output ■ 
ratbof multipiy/divide 
stages from 1:Ho 
1 :999,999 vvnth the 
push 01 a button. 



■s e hj c:; C3 1=^ E 



C]>*HA ChtAMB A4tt ^tClC^k 



uiCrtAL M 




V0LTVU1V1V0H 


CHANNEL A 1 




VtHTlCAt 










rDUTIDH 








■ "' 

■ - 


©^ 


"-M: 


MPU1 eOU^LlHQ 


^ 


w-^ 


"LZ 


Mi n 


'SKi 




■- 
■- 


vEtincu 


v[n,Ti^cj(vtn(w 


CHANNEL e X 


© 


"©' 


toi^tiTcoyrUMQ 


G. 


H •'<■" 




WITH ItMMnH 






A DELTA MEASUREMEtJTS 


TRIGGER ^ 


A iNCtl^StflLti A 


&aitttce 


U6aE 1 








^^tk ATME 


H311TKIK 

© 


TIMEBWE-FREQ 


■■•©•■" '^^ 


rOlrAHITV 
OMOVHD 


CKTIAia 


WAVEFORM ANALVZEn 






aM4«ohL(u 



■AutotrackingDCV, PPV, 
Fieq: Measure DCV to 
.5%; PPV to 2%; 
freq. to .001 % . Just 
push a button for 
either Channel A or B. 



One probe input: One 
probe input per 
channel for ail 

measurements ■ 
kdigitai and scope - 
^th 5 mV to 2000 V 
measuring range. (2 
lo-cap probes 
provided.) 



Super sync: ECL 

) provides rock-soiid 
sync trigger circuits 
vinth oniy 4 controls; 
includes TV sync 
separators for video 
work. 



U.S. Patent Pending 
Financing Available 



The first scope with push button 
digftai readout. If you use general 
purpose oscilloscopes for trouble- 
shooting or testing, we can double 
your present productivity with the 
SC61 Waveform Analyzer, the first 
instrument to turn every conventional 
scope measurement into an 
automatic digital readout. 

No more graticule counting. 
Connect only one probe to view 
any waveform tolOO MHz. Then, just 
push a button to read DCV, PPV, 
frequency and time — automatically! 

There are no graticules to count or 
calculations to make, which speeds 
every measurement. 

The digital readout is from 1 to 
10,000 times more accurate as well. 

Plus you have everything you want 
to know about a test point, at the 
push of a button, which speeds 
troubleshooting tremendously. 



A special Delta function even lets 
you intensify parts of a waveform and 
digitally measure the PPV, time or 
frequency for just that waveform 
section. 

And it's neat. No more tangled 
leads, piles of probes or dangling 
cords. The SC61 is an entire test 
station in one unit. 

The one and only. There are other 
scopes with digital readout, but none 
of them completely automate every 
conventional scope measurement so 
you can automatically analyze any 
waveform without counting one 
single graticule. Totally automatic 
waveform analyzing at the push of a 
button. It wll! make all the difference 
in your productivity. 

Double your productivity. When 
we say the SC61 will double your 
productivity, we're being 
conservative. We've seen cases of 

CIRCLE 70 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 
CIRCLE 71 FOR DEMONSTRATION 



three, four, even ten time increases 
in productivity with this first-of-its- 
kind, automated oscilloscope. Every 
situation is different, however, so try 

the SC61 and judge for yourself. ^ 

Here's our offer. 

Money back guarantee. If the 
SC61 does not at least double your 
productivity during the first thirty 
days, you may return it for a full 
refund, including freight both ways. 

Call today. Get the entire SC61 
Waveform Analyzer story. Call toll- 
free today, and ask for our eight page 
color brochure. It could be the most 
productive call you make this year! 

Phone Toil-Free 
1-800-843-3338 I 

Alaska, Heviiau, Canada and 
South Dakota cail coOect 

(605)339-0100 



:r^c:oi=<i 



3200 Sencore Drive, Sioux Falls, SD 571 07 



o 
o 

DC 



UU 

I 

o 

D 
< 



wabasK 



for 

as 

low 

as 



diskettes 

$1.39 each! 

Now... Get High Quality at a Low Price 

Wabasii means quality products that you can depend on. 
For over 1 6 years, Wabash has been making high quality 
computer products. Wabash diskettes are made to provide 
error-free performance on your computer system. Every 
Wabash diskette is individually tested and is 1 00% certified 
to insure premium performance. 

Why Wabash is Special 

The quality of Wabash diskettes is stressed throughout 
the entire manufacturing process. Aftercoating, all Wabash 
diskettes go through a unique burnishing process that 
gives each diskette a mirror-smooth appearance. Wabash 
then carefully applies a lubricant that is specially form- 
ulated to increase diskette life. This saves you money, 
since your discs may last longer. It also assists your disk 
drives in maintaining constant speed which can reduce 
read and write errors. 

Special Seal... Helps Prevent Contamination 

To keepoutforeign particles, aunique heat seal bondsthe 
jacket and liner together. A special thermal seat Vk'hich 
avoids contamination from adhesives, is then used to fold 
and seal the jacket. This results in outstanding perfor- 
mance and true reliability. Wabash then packages each 
diskette, (except bulk pack) in a super strong and tear 
resistant Tyvek® evelope. The final Wabash product is 
then shrink-w/rapped to insure cleanliness and reduce 
contamination during shipment. 

Each Diskette is 1 00% Critically Tested 

Since each step in the Wabash diskette manufacturing 
process is subject to strict quality control procedures, you 
can be sure Wabash diskettes vi'ill perform for you. And 
every Wabash diskette meets the ultra-high standards of 
ANSI, ECMA, IBM and ISO in addition to the many critical 
quality control tests performed by Wabash. Wabash does 
all of this testing to provide you with consistently high 
quality diskettes. Reliability and data integrity - that's 
what Wabash quality is all about. 

Flexible Disc Quantity Discounts Available 

Wabash diskettes are packed 1 discs to a carton and 1 
cartons to a case. The economy bulk pack is packaged 
100 discs to a case without envelopes or labels. Please 
order only in increments of 100 units for quantity 100 
pricing. With the exception of bulk pack, we are also 
willing to accommodate your smaller orders. Quantities 
less than 1 00 units are available in increments of 1 units 
at a 10% surcharge. Quantity discounts are also avail- 
able. Order 500 or more discs at the same time and deduct 
1%; 1 ,000 or more saves you 2%; 2,000 or more saves you 
3%; 5,000 or more saves you 4%; 10,000 or more saves 
you 5%; 25,000 or more saves you 6%; 50,000 or more 
saves you 7% and 1 00,000 or more discs earns you an 8% 
discount off our super low quantity 100 price. Almost all 
Wabash diskettes are immediately available from CE. Our 
warehouse facilities are equipped to help us get you the 
quality product you need, when you need it. If you need 
further assistance to find the flexible disc that's right for 
you, call the Wabash diskette compatibility hotline. Dial 
toll-free 800-323-9868 and ask for your compatibility 
representative. In Illinois or outside the United States dial 
31 2-593-6363 between 9 AM to 4 PM Central Time. 



Part* 


CE quant- 
1 00 price 


Fill 


1.99 


F111B 


1.79 


F31A 


1.99 


F131 


2.49 


F14A 


3.19 


F144 


3.19 


F145 


3.19 


F147 


3.19 


M11A 


i.a9 


M11AB 


1.39 


M41A 


1.59 


M51A 


1.59 


M51F 


2.99 


M13A 


1.89 


U13AB 


1.69 


M13A 


2.79 


M43A 


1.B9 


MS3A 


1,89 


M14A 


2.79 


M44A 


2.79 


M54A 


2.79 


M15A 


2.69 


U16A 


3.79 



SAVE ON WABASH DISKETTES 

Product Description 

8" SSSD IBM Compatible (128 B/S, 26 Sectors) 

8" Same as above, but bu!k pack w/o envelope 

8" SSSD Shugart Compatible, 32 Hard Sector 

8" SSDD IBM Compatible (128 B/S. 25 Sectors) 

8" DSDD Soft Sector [Unformatted) 

8" DSDD Soft Sector {256 B/S, 26 Sectors) 

3" DSDD Soft Sector (51 2 B/S, 15 Sectors) 

S" DSDD Soft Sector (1024 B/S, 8 Sectors) 

5'4" SSSD Soft Sector w/Hub Ring 

5V4" Same as above, but bulk pack w/o envelope 

5'/«" SSSD 10 Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 

6W SSSD 1 6 Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 

5V*" SSDD Lanier No-problem compatible 

5V4" SSDD Soft Sector v^/Hub Ring 

5'A" Same as above, but bulk pack w/o envelope 

5Vt" SSDD Soft Sector Flippy Disk (use both sides) 

SVt" SSDD 10 Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 

5V." SSDD 16 Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 

5Vj" DSDD Soft Sector w/Hub Ring 

SVi" DSDD 10 Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 

5V4" DSDD ie Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 

5V." SSQD Soft Sector w/Hub Ring (96 TPI) 

5'/4" DSQD Soft Sector w/Hub Ring (96 TPI) 

SSSD = Single Sided Single Density: SSDD - Single Sided Double Density; 
DSDD = Double Sided Double Density: SSQD = Single Sided Quad Density: 
DSQD = Double Sided Quad Density: TPI = Tracks per inch. 

Buy with Confidence 

To get the fastest delivery from CE of your Wabash computer 
products, send or ptione your order directly to our Computer 
Products Division. Be sure to calculate your price using the CE 
prices in this ad. Michigan residents please add 4% sates tax or 
supply your tax I.D. number. Written purchase orders are accep- 
ted from approved government agencies and most well rated 
firms at a 30% surcharge for net 30 billing. All sales are subject to 
availability, acceptance and verification. All sales are final. Prices, 
terms and specifications are subject to change without notice. All 
prices are in tJ.S. dollars. Out of stock items v^ill be placed on 
backorder automatically unless CE is instructed differently. Min- 
imum prepaid order $50.00. Minimum purchase order $200.00. 
International orders are invited with a $20.00 surcharge for 
special handling in addition to shipping charges. All shipments 
are F.O.B, Ann Arbor, Michigan. No COD's please. Non-certified 
and foreign checks require bank clearance. 

For shipping charges add $8.00 per case or partial-case of 
1 00 8-inch discs or $6,00 per case or partial-case of 1 00 SVi-inch 
mini-discs for U.P.S. ground shipping and handling in the con- 
tinental United States. 

Mail orders to; Communications Electronics, Box 1002, 
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 U.S.A. If you have a MasterCard 
or Visa card, you may call and place a credit card order. Order 
toll-free in the U.S. Dial 800-521-4414. If you are outside the 
U.S. or in Michigan, dial 313-994-4444. Order your Wabash 
diskettes from Communications Electronics today. 
Copyright ' 1982 Com municati oris Electronics*" Ad #1 10582 




MostwCoid 







CHIICCT Mtll, 



OrderToll-Free! wabash 

800-521-4414 error-free 



In Michigan 313-994-4444 



diskettes 



COMMUNICATIONS 
ELECTRONICS" 

Computer Products Diwlsiort 

854 Phoenix n Box 1002 □ Ann Arbor, Michigan 48 106 U.S.A. 
Call TOLL-FREE (8O0} 521-4414 or outddv U.S.A. (313) 994-4444 




CIRCLE 81 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




Electronics 

Electronics pubfishers since 1908 



THE MAGAZINE FOR NEW 
IDEAS IN ELECTRONICS 



MAY 1983 Vol. 54 No. 5 



BUILD THIS 



TECHNOLOGY 



57 TALKING ALARM CLOCK 

Only a few ICs are needed to build a dock that really tells time. 
Lee Giinsky 

61 CAR BURGLAR ALARM 

An inexpensive form of insurance that can avert an automobile 
break-in. Edward W. Loxterkamp 

73 VLF-HF PASSIVE ANTENNA TUNER 

Another approach lo optimizing reception at very-low frequen- 
cies. R.W. Burtians 



4 VIDEO ELECTRONICS 

Tomorrow's news and technoiogy in tliis quickly ctianging industry. 
David Lachenbruch 

12 SATELLITE TELETEXT NEWS 

The iatest liappenings tn communications technology. 
Gary H. Arlen 



14 VIDEOGAMES 

Games thai taik. Danny Goodman 



CIRCUITS AND 
COMPONENTS 



54 NEW IDEAS 

Easy liquid rosin flux. 

65 MUSIC SYNTHESIZER tC's 

Large-scaie-integration ICs have greatly simplified the design of 
electronic music-synthesizers. Ttiomas Henry 

69 DA CONVERTER APPLICATIONS 

The ins and outs ot DACs. Joseph J. Carr 

77 REWINDING TRANSFORMERS 

Can t locate a Iranslormer (hat meets your needs? Make your 
own. Don. A, Meador 

81 HOW TO DESIGN ANALOG CIRCUITS 

Using audio-output transistors. Mannle Horowitz 

86 HOBBY CORNER 

How 10 change cassette-recorder speeds. 
Earl "Doc" Savage, K4SDS 

90 THE DRAWING BOARD 

Regulated power supplies. Robert Grossblatt 



VIDEO 94 SERVICE CLINtC 

An unusuai output-stage problem. Jack Darr 

96 SERVICE QUESTIONS 

R-E"s Service Editor soives technicians' problems. 



COMPUTERS SO COIMPUTER CORNER 

What to took for in a terminal Les Spindle 



EQUIPMENT 26 Fluke Model 8060A DMM 

REPORTS 29 Sony Model TC-K555 Stereo Cassette Deck 
31 MFJ Model MFJ-dS9 Receiver Tuner'Preamp 



DEPARTMENTS 



10 Advertising and Sales Offices 

140 Advertising Index 
10 Editorial 

141 Free information Card 
22 Letters 



109 Market Center 

85 New Hooks 

38 New Products 

6 What's News 



If ON THE COVER M 
jfTiepieces have come a tremen 
ous way in the past few years- 
'rotTi wind-up and electric docks tc 
those with LED and LCD display; 
and — now— to clocks with no dis 
play at all! The talking alarnn clocti 
^teatured in this issue will announce 
m^e time either automatically or oi 
Kfequest, and can also be set to tel 
^ou when its lime to get up. Moderr 
speech-synthesis ICs make it ex 
tremely easy to build, as you'll fine 
Gu^artin^f^aa^T^^^M 








■w 


r 










v: 


IILEAB 




nMaUH 


fM 


~X 








iniiEAj,L 













THE MAINSTAY of today s popular music is lti> 
synlhesiier. Once Incredibly difficult and 
pensive to design and build. Its currenl populai 

y Is due in part to the versalilily built Into Ihi 
I IC's that are found at its heart. The story 

pee IC s can Ik found on page 65. 

COMING NEXT MONTH 
On Sale May 19 

Special Videogames Secttl 

What's new for 1983...and what'; 
in store for the future. 
Add-on RAM. A non-volatile 6i 
memory expansion you can builc 
for your Timex Sinclair WOO. 
LF Loop Antennas. The next i 
stallment on our continuing series 
■" on VLF-LF receiving techniques^ 
• And lots more! 

RadfCf-Electronics, (tSSN 0033-7S«2) Published monlhl^ 
biy Gemsback Publications, Inc., 200 Parl< Avenue South. 
New York, NY 10003. Second-Class Postage Paid al New 
VOfk. N,Y. and additional mailing of (ices. One-year subscrip- 
tion rate: U.S.A. and U.S. possessions. 514.97. Canada. 
517,97, Other couniries, $22 A7 [cash orders only, payabte 
in U.S.A. currency, ) Sinoie copies Si ,50, f I9fl3 liy Gems- 
back Pubiitalions. Inc, All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. 

Subscrfption Sflrvtce: Mail all subscriplton orders. 
changes, correspondence and Postrr>a;ster Notices ot un- 
deiivered copies {Form 3579) to Radio-Electronics Sub- 
scription Service, Box 2520. Boulder, CO 80322, 

A stamped self-addressed envelope must accompany ali 
submitted manuscnpls and or artwork or photographs if tfieir 
return is desired should they be rejected. We disclaJm any 
responsibility for the loss or damage ot manuscripts and. or 
artwork or ptiotographts while in our possession or otherwise. 



5 

Asa service to readerSn Radlo-Efectronics publishes availably plans or information relating to newsworttiy products, techniques and scientific and teclinoiogicai dovalopments, <a 

Because of po&aibie variancas in tho quality and condition of msterials and workmanship used by r«adors» Radto-Eledronics disclaims any responsibility for the safe and proper Q^ 

functioning of reader-built projects based upon Or from plans or information pubiisfied tn thfs magazine. ^ 



VIDEO ELECTRONICS 



DAVID LACHENBRUCH 

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 




CONVERTIBLE 
VCR 



A new approach to portable VCR's is RCA's ultra-deluxe model 900 "convertible," (see photo 
above) the first product to be offered under the new contract in which Hitachi replaced 
Matsushita as the company's prime source of video recorders. The recorder resembles a 
normal high-end VCR wiien in home use. But for use as a portable, the hinged control drawer 
at the front is lowered and the deck unit slides out. When replaced for playback, the 7.9-poLind 
portable automatically "docks" into a connector at the rear, eliminating cable connections. 
The new VHS recorder has five heads, the fifth used for noiseless special effects ex- 
clusively. It has all high-end features, plus a few new ones, including a complete wireless 
remote control, 8-event 21 -day programmability, liquid-crystal display showing elapsed re- 
cording time, sound -on -sound recording, "video dub" for insert edits, monitor earphone, 
digital keypad tuning, and a jack for a pay-TV cable converter. 



UNIVERSAL 
REMOTE 



One of the annoyances of the video age is the profusion of controls and buttons to pusii. The 
owner of a TV, videodisc player, VCR, and stereo may be required to sit with four remote- 
control keypads on his lap in order to use the advantages of all the latest conveniences. 
Presumably that is about to change. Sony has already announced two Unicontrol systems, 
designed to work with both its TV sets and Betamax recorders, hinting that in the future they 
may control Sony stereos as well. This spring, RCA is expected to unveil its own universal 
remote control, which will operate its TV sets, VCR's, and videodisc players. Those devices 
will work only with equipment of the given brand. If you have, say, a Sony TV, an RCA VCR, 
and a Pioneer videodisc player, you'll presumably still need three remote controls. Is it 
possibly time for an allocation of the infrared-command frequencies for standardization of 
remote-control systems so that in the future any remote unit will work with any equipment? 



NEW BETA 



I 



CO 

g 

o 

a: 

H 
O 
LU 

_I 
LU 

6 

o 
< 

EC 



The Beta group of VCR manufacturers, seeking to improve their lagging market share, can be 
expected to introduce several innovations in the next few months. The imminence of the New 
Beta Hi-Fi sound system has already gained Beta three new adherents in the United States. 
Audio manufacturers Aiwa, Pioneer, and Nakamichi plan to Introduce Beta Hi-Fi recorders, 
using the breathtaking new sound system being adopted for Beta recorders. As described in 
this column last September, Beta machines to be introduced this spring will feature high- 
fidelity stereo audio recording and playback via a frequency-modulated pair of soundtracks 
on the helical video track between the chrominance and luminance signals. 

Compatible recorded programs — both musical tapes and movies— are already becoming 
available. They're playable on existing Beta VCR's because they have sound on both the 
longitudinal and helical tracks. The new recorders have no additional recording or playback 
heads, the standard video heads being used for the audio material; the sound is separated 
from the video in the machines' circuitry. Although Aiwa (owned by Sony] and Pioneer have 
long been Beta licensees, they plan to enter the American VCR market for the first time this 
year. Nakamichi is completely new to the video market and hopes to manufacture a video 
recorder compatible with its reputation for excellence in audio. It is considering adding video 
monitors as well. Although members of the VHS group have demonstrated audio systems 
similar to Beta Hi-Fi, they are undecided about marketing plans. R-E 



^f»-t 



TEK 2200 



MULTI-PURPOSE 
OSCILLOSCOPES 



THE PERFORMANCE/ 
PRICE STANDARD 



Tek's most successful 

scope series ever: At $1200-$1450, 

it's easy to see wKiy! 




In 30 years of Tektrorrix oscil- 
loscope leadership, no other 
scopes have recorded the 
immediate popular appeal of 
the Tek 2200 Series. The Tek 2213 
and 2215 are unapproachable for the 
perlormance and reliability they 
offer at a surprisingly affordable 
price. 

There's no compromise with 
Tektronix quality: The low cost is the 
result of a new design concept that 
cut mechanical parts by 65%. Cut 
cabling by 90%. Virtually eliminated 
board electrical connectors. And 
eliminated the need for a cooling fan, 



Yet performance is written all over 
the front panels. There's the band- 
width for digital and analog circuits. 
The sensitivity for low signal mea- 
surements. The sweep speeds for 
fast logic families. And delayed 
sweep for fast, accurate timing 
measurements. 

The cost: $1200* for the 2213. 
$1450* for the dual time base 2215. 

You can order, or obtain more 
information, through the Tektronix 
National Marketing Center, where 
technical personnel can answer 
your questions and expedite 
delivery. Your direct order includes 



probes, operating manuals, 15- 
day return policy and full Tektronix 
warranty 

For quantity purchases, please 
contact your local Tektronix sales 
representative. 

Order toii free: 
1-800-426-2200 
Extension 53 

In Oregon call collect: 
(503) 627-9000 Ext. 53 



"Price F.O.B. Beavedon. OR. Price suDject to cliange. 



'tektronix 



COMMTTEDtO£3(CeuJENCe S 

> 

< 



Capyrighl©t9BZ, Tektronix. Inc. Alt righls reserved, TTA-33B 



WHAT'S NEWS 



"Home computer/robot" 
is shown at Las Vegas 

A robot especially designed for 
the home-computer enthusiast 
was exhibited at the International 
Winter Consumer Electronics 
Show in Las Vegas last January. 
The home robot was described by 
its manufacturer, Robotics in- 
ternational Corp, of Jackson. M\, 
as not only an adjunct to existing 
liome computers, but also as a 
totally self-contained com- 
puterized system, with robotic 
hardware and software compatible 
witti existing home microproces- 
sors. It can be equipped for 
vacuuming, entertaining, or pro- 
viding security, without human 
monitoring, says its developer. 

The robot stands 4Vs-feet high 
and weighs about 120 pounds. 
Two 7-inch drive wheels and two 
casters allow it to negotiate hard- 
wood floors or thick-pile carpets. It 



is powered by two 12-volt, 20 
ampere-hour batteries, One 
charge is good tor about four 
hours. When the battery Is low, the 
robot can identify its own location, 
then go and connect to its personal 
recharging unit. 

When the robot is first put into 
operation, it "walks" around the 
home, chirping ultrasonically as it 
maps wall distances and furniture 
location. It recalls that map each 
time it re-enters a room. Thus, it 
can vacuum a room full of furniture 
without damaging anything. In- 
frared obstacle -avoidance keeps it 
from bumping Into pets, children, 
or new obstacles. 

The head contains a cathode- 
ray tube that displays normal 
alphanumeric information, and has 
a pre-programmed video "mouth" 
with lips that mimic lip motion when 
it is synthesizing speech. The CRT 
operates normally when linked to 




A FORMIDABLE SENTRY, THE ROBOT security monitor stands guard over 
ihe home. For that purpose it is equipped with microwave, passive infrared, 
and audio discrimination detectors. The robot is made by Robotics In- 
ternational Corp, of Jackson, Ml, 



the home computer, or to an op- 
tional computer package and soft- 
ware that eliminates the need for 
an external computer. 

The robot can be equipped op- 
tionally with a security package, 
one or two arms, a vacuuming unit, 
a computer with keyboard and 48K 
or more of memory, and state-of- 
the-art voice recognition, 

IBM joins Japanese 
in researcli effort 

International Business 
Machines (IBM) has Informed the 
Japanese government that it 
would like to join a research project 
to develop a "fifth generation com- 
puter" that Japan started early in 
1982. The proposed computer 
would think like a human being. 

The Japanese l»/linistry of In- 
ternational Trade and Industry is 
subsidizing the project with an ini- 
tial grant of 423 million yen (about 
1 ,7 million dollars) for preliminary 
research, 

Fujitsu, Hitachi, NEC, and five 
other Japanese companies are 
already taking part in the project. 
Several European computer mak- 
ers have also shown interest. 
Thus, the 10-year project is on its 
way to become the world's largest 
international research effort in 
computer history. 

New GE GaAs FET's 
improve power htandling 

Genera! Electric Research and 
Development scientists have de- 
veloped a novel high- volt age pow- 
er field-effect transistor (FET) with 
switching speeds of less than five 
billionths of a second, and with re- 
sistance about one-tenth that of 
comparable silicon devices. The 
new FET's can block up to 150 
volts— the best previous gallium 
arsenide FET's would not go l3e- 
yond 85 volts. 

Breaking with conventional hori- 
zontal layout [with the source, gate 
and drain closely aligned on the 
top of the chip), the new FET's 
have a large source contact on the 
top and a large drain contact on the 
bottom of the chip, with the fine 
gate regions running through the 
center. 

By avoiding the close arrange- 
ment of tiny details on the surface 
of the wafer, the GE layout in- 
creases current-handling capabil- 




GE'S NOVEL VERTICAL-CHANNEL 
gallium arsenide field-effect transis- 
tor that blocks up to 150 volts and 
switches in less than 5 billionths of a 
second. This photornicrograph 
shows its unusual construction. 
Most gallium-arsenide devices are 
horizontal, with the fine lines that 
form the source, gate, and drain 
closely aligned at the top of the chip. 
The GE design places a large source 
contact on top ofthectiip and a large 
drain contact on the bottom, with fine 
gate regions running through the 
center, 

Ity and reduces the possibility that 
a crystalline defect In the material 
can result in lines that touch, caus- 
ing the devices to short out. That 
buried-gate design yields high 
quality and few defective chips. 



Larger-than-life video 
shown at Las Vegas 

General Electric demonstrated a 
consumer-oriented system that 
projects bright, clear, color video 
Images up to 25 feet wide at the 
Consumer Electronics Show at 
Las Vegas last January, 

The Tataria Technology uses a 
single-gun, single-optical-path 
system and can accept video sig- 
nals from off-the-air tuners, live TV 
cameras, tapes and discs, and 
computer terminals with standard 
video output. The system is 
already in use for industrial ap- 
plications such as background dis- 
play on TV weather broadcasts, 
magnification of minute details for 
display in large lecture halls, and 
large-screen CCTV broadcasts. 
(amtuwed on paf>e 8) 



sttfie 



l\|eW 



^^"jci^ ^^rk((r^ 



•^pff 



M 



Si 



M^*"^ 



Full 



Fonc** 



3'A 



pig"* 



Hain 



He'*' 



pMl^ 



.o»<"o,*r 



, ftta^e ^*'^ _^qo v*^ %o Ik ^^'" 



rt\oa* 






*'^"^'' ^^^^^3^^^^^ 






\n^ 






-Wd^ 






^^ViO\c8 




rt^a-^" 



6U»^* 






j^ec^ 



05 



\>N0-^ 









IROLE 23 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



WHAFS NEWS 



(continued fvom page 6) 



Sharp supplies "office 
in an attache case" 

With three compact new pieces 
of equipment. Sharp claims: "To- 
day's businessman can carry most 
of his office needs right in his 
attache case and still have room 
left for lunch." 

The new EL-6200 Planning Cal- 
culator (SYie X 'Vis X 3ya inches) 
acts as an ever-present secretary. 
It reminds him of aii appointments, 
including business meetings and 
lunch dates, who and when to call. 
and the phone numbers. An in- 
teresting feature is the use of sym- 
bols in the display — a dinner date 
might be indicated by a knife and 
forl(, for example. When it's not be- 
ing used as a reminder of specific 
appointments, it serves as a stan- 
dard clock and calendar. 

The Ei.-7?DDMemowriter (7'%2 
X 1 Vte, X 3% inches) provides a 
miniature typewriter keyboard, a 
complete display, and a printer that 
makes hard copy on paper. (The 
memo may be written on the dis- 
play and then immediately erased, 
or by pushing a print button, 
turned into hard copy. The 
Memowriter has a memory of up to 
40 words.) 

The 7050 Graph Generator 
(lOViG X 131/32 X 5% inches) is 
designed for the sales engineer in 
the field. It generates a number of 
line or bar charts and ribbon or cir- 
cle graphs— in four colors, com- 



plete with shading. It can make one 
drawing on top of another to com- 
pare the effects of different inputs, 
or enlarge or reduce any segment 
ofachart.{Botheffectscanbevery 
useful in competitive sales situa- 
tions,) 

Three-armed robot makes 
prInted'Circuit boards 

A new high-precision, 
microprocessor-controlled robot 
for use in printed-circuit man- 
ufacture is claimed to be the first 
robot on the market able to place 
non-standard parts automatically 
at high speed. Called the Sembler 
model CAR-WOO, it is made by 
Control Automation. Inc. of Prince- 
ton, NJ. 

The Sembler is available with 
one, two, or three arms, and is pre- 
cise to 0.001 inch. Each arm is 
capable ot coordinated motion in 
X, Y. or 2 axes, plus wrist rotation 
(theta axis). The work envelope is 
56 Inches long, 20 inches deep, 
and 20 inches high. The robot wrist 
can rotate up to 1 80 degrees. Load 
capacity is 10 pounds. 

The robot picks up the appropri- 
ate part (transformer, relay, IC, 
etc.) and places it precisely in the 
desired positon on the printed- 
circuit board. Its precision allows it 
to handle odd-shaped com- 
ponents. 

With appropriate procedures. 





MODEL CAR-WOO SEMBLER MICROPROCESSOR-CONTROLLED ROBOT. 



SHARP MEMOWRITER, PLANNER, AND GRAPH GENERATOR (clockwise 
from upper left) can indeed fit in an attache case, with room for some extra 
rremo paper. 



the Sembler can be controlled by 
any computer, in any language. 
The standard system includes an 
external computer (SC 1000) that 
the user programs in BASIC. That 
makes the robot literally plug- 
compatible with other assembly 
components. 

All of the robot's motions are 
actuated by DC servo motors 
through lead screws with zero 
backlash. That eliminates belts 
and pulleys and results in a re- 
latively maintenance-free robot. 

The robot's chief application is 
assembling printed-circuit boards. 
Other applications include material 
handling and asembling computer 
peripherals (keyboards, etc.) and 
small electronic and automotive 
subassemblies. 



Computer tracks down 
hit-and-run drivers 

Tokyo police are now using a 
computer to catch drivers who 



leave the scene of an accident. In 
1 983 over 93 percent of the drivers 
in over 1 ,000 hit-and-run accidents 
in the metropolitan area were 
apprehended, and the police be- 
lieve it possible to raise the figure 
to nearly 100 percent. 

The computer analyzes paint 
particles left at the scene of the 
accident. A bit of paint as small as 
0.2 mm (smaller than a pencil 
point} is all that the computer re- 
quires. The computer compares 
the paint with data on more than 
10,000 finishes in its memory. It 
then tells the make, model, and 
year of all cars on which the finish 
was used. That information re- 
duces tremendously the number of 
cars that might have been in- 
volved. 

The work is done in five minutes, 
compared to the half day required 
for visual checking. Further, the 
older method requires a particle of 
2 mm — ten times the size of the 
computer sample. R-E 



TEK 



TM 500 MODULAR 
TEST INSTRUMENTS 



Make your choice 

from the world's most accepted 

modular test instruments! 






TM 500 means reliable, proven 
performance at an affordable 
price! Nothing else offers this kind 
of capability and convenience: 
over 35 compact piug-in modules 
spanning the total test and mea- 
surement instrument array. Com- 
patible with each other and with 
TM 5000 Programmable Instru- 
ments. All of which configure easily 
in a variety of mainframes. TM 500 
lets you create your own compact 
personalized instrument setup: 
manual, programmable or hybrid. 

A TM 500 mainframe and 
plug-ins take less space than 
monolithic instruments. And 
less time to set up. The main- 
frame's rear panel interface con- 
nections reduce cable clutter and 
simplify operation. What's more, 
you can easily interface plug-ins 
with devices external to the 
mainframe. 



Hundreds of customized sys- 
tems are possible. The TM 500 

family itself includes DM Ms, Coun- 
ters, Pulse Generators, Function 
Generators, Amplifiers, Oscillators, 
Power Supplies, Oscilloscopes, 
Calibration Instruments, even blank 
plug-in kits to build you own. Plus a 
choice of eight mainframes to 
house plug-ins: bench, rackmount 
and portable versions. 

All modules are interchangeable 
among mainframe compartments, 
so you can set up a system for one 
test, then reconfigure for a com- 
pletely different application. 



Match your own requirements 
with TM 500! Get high perform- 
ance for testing sophisticated 
equipment, without having to buy 
more capability than you need, 
There are several performance 
level choices within each instru- 
ment type for maximum cost- 
effectiveness. 

Our TM 500 Selection Guide 
covers the entire line. Get your 
copy plus a complete price 
list, from your local Tektronix 
Sales Engineer. Or by calling 
1-800-547-1512. (In Oregon, call 
1-800-452-1877.) Or contact 
Tektronix, Inc., PO. 1700, 
Beaverton, OR 97075. 



The Answer 
By Any 
Measure 




CopyTight©19e3. Tektronix, I nc Alt nghtsiEServed T7A-31 



EDITORIAL 



Becoming An Author 



Every year or two, I write an editorial devoted to our readers who 
yearn to become authors and write for Radio-Electronics. Based on 
the number of inquiries I've received on this subject lately, I've de- 
cided to repeat an editorial that was published almost two years ago: 

Wherever I go, the most often asked question is: "How do I go 
about writing an article for Radio-Electronics?" I do not dismiss that 
question lightly. Our readers represent a vast untapped reservoir of 
knowledge. Each and every one of you has developed a special ex- 
pertise in at least one particular area. Many of you have unique 
ideas and knowledge that is not widely known. The drive to acquire 
knowledge and share knowledge and ideas with others is immense. 
In fact, that is the main function of Radio-Electronics. It is a vehicle 
for the exchange of knowledge and ideas. For those reasons we en- 
courage our readers to write articles. 

What do you get out of writing an article? Aside from the extra in- 
come and recognition of having your name in print, there's the satis- 
faction of sharing your knowledge with others. In fact, you have ad- 
vanced the knowledge of the members of this industry and have 
helped people just like yourself. Indeed, it is a rewarding and satisfy- 
ing achievement. 

Submitting an article is not difficult. It is simply a matter of sending 
it to my attention. The best first step, however, is to send me an out- 
line of the article to see if we're interested in the subject. If we are, 
we'll tell you to go ahead and perhaps even make a few suggestions 
regarding your outline. 

There are far too many steps involved in writing an article for us to 
cover here. However, we do have an Author's Guide that will answer 
many of your questions, if we've managed to stir your curiosity, then 
send a self-addressed stamped envelope to Author's Guide, Radio- 
Electronics, 200 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10003, and 
we'll send you one. 

Now what's your excuse for not writing an article? 




ART KLEIMAN 

Editor 



ElcetroniGS 



Hugo Gernsback (1884-1967) founder 

M. Harvey Gernsback, editor-Jn-chie1 

Larry Steckler, GET, publisher 

Arthur Kleiman, editor 

Josef Bernard, K2HUF, technical editor 

Carl Laron, WS2SLR, associate editor 

Brian C. Fenton, assistant editor 

Jack Darr, CET, service editor 

Robert F. Scott, semiconductor editor 

Herb Friedman, communications editor 

Gary H. Arlen, contributing editor 

David Lachenbruch, contributing editor 

Earl "Doc" Savage, K4SDS. hobby editor 

Danny Goodman, contributing editor 

Dan Rosenbloom, production manager 

Robert A. W. Lowndes, production 
associate 

Francine Tyler, production assistant 

Joan Roman, circulation director 

Arlirie R. Fishman, 
adveflising coordinator 

Cover ptoto by Robert Lawis 

Radio-Electronics is indexed in Applied Sci- 
ence S Teclinology Index and Readers 
Guide to Periodical Literature. 



Gornsback Publications. Inc. 
200 Park Ave. S.. New York, NY 10003 
President: M. Harvey Gernsback 
Vice President: Larry Steckler 

ADVERTISING SALES 212-777-6400 

Larry Sleekier 
Publisher 

EAST SOUTHEAST 

Stanley Levitan 
Had 10- Electronics 
200 Park Ave. South 
New York, NY 10003 
21 2-777-S400 

Ml D W E ST. Texas ' Ar ka nsas'Okla. 

Ralph Bergen 

The Ralph Bergen Co., Inc. 

540 Frontage Road— Suite 325 

Northtleld, Illinois 60093 

312-446-1444 

PACIFIC COAST 
Mountain States 

Marvin Green 
Radio-Eleclronics 
413 So. La Brea Ave. 
Los Angetes, Ca 90036 
213-938-0166-7 



J 



m: 




10 



inTRODUCins tne uu 
afforcsaDie ceacninq 



tne uuarici's first, 



HERO^ the 

most soptiisticated 
microprocessor- 
confrolied device 
since ttie 
microcomputer. 

HEROItsacomptetely ' 
self-contained, electro- 
mechanical robot capa- 
ble of interacting witti 
its environment. Con- 
trolled by an on-board, 
programmable com- 
puter, it has electronic 
sensors to detect light, sound, mo 
tion and obstruction in its path. 

Capable of seven axes of mo 






tion, the robot can be programmed 
to pick up small objects with its arm. 
It will also speak in complete sen- 
tences, using its voice synthesizer 
Remarkable though the robot is, 
- its companion Robo- 
tics Education Course 
is an even more signifi- 
cant "first." It provides 
a thorough under- 
standing of robot tech- 
nologies, including 
robotics programming. 
Course features self-test 
unit reviews, experi- 
_ ments and final exam. 

Designed to be used with 
HER0 1, this 1200 page course is the 
most complete introduction to 
robotics available today. 





Heathkit/Zenith 
national Syst< 



HER0 1 is a computer on wheels. 

HER0 1 uses a 6808 microprocessor 
that controls 13 functions and sense 
boards. Its on-board processor 
can take it through complex ma- 
neuvers. The programming proc- 
ess is straightforward with provision 
for step-by-step debugging, en- 
hancement and other corrections. 

HER01 senses include: sound de- 
tection (frequency range 200- 
5000 Hz); light detection; ultrasonic 
ranging; ultrasonic motion detec- 
tion; speech synthesis; and real 
time, four year calendar clock. 

A completely mobile platform 
robot, HEROI's motion abilities per- 
mit head rotation and arm rotation 
of 350, shoulder rotation of 150° 
arm extension of 5 inches, wrist 
pivot of 180 and wrist rotation of 
350. Gripper will open to a max- 
imum of 3V2 inches and rotate 90 
at extreme extension. Paylood ca- 
pacity of arm is 8 oz, at maximum 
extension and 16 oz. at normal. 

The remarkable HER0 1 robot is in 
production now. ready for you. Buy 
assembled or build it from a kit. Kit 
price is $1500 and the assembled 
robot is $2500, FOB Benton Harbor, 
or through your nearest Heothkit 
Electronic Center. 

For full information on HERO 1 
call SOO-253-0570 toll-free. (In 
Alaska, Hawaii and Michigan, call 
616-982-3411.) We'll give you the 
address of the nearest Heathktt 
Electronic Center and send you a 
booklet that gives details about 
the robot, the content of this 
course, and other information. 



Pleose send details on the HER0 1 robot 
and robotics course. 

Mail to: Heattt Company, Dept 02CH)28 
Benton Harbor, Ml 49022 



Hoolhkil/ZertthEducatiofiQlSvstemsisadivlsionolH&ath Company, 
Senior Harbot. Michigan 4TO22. RO-100A 



CIRCLE 17 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



SATELLITE/TELETEXT NEWS 



GARY ARLEN 

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 



LOW-FLYING 

"SPACE 

MIRROR" COULD 

SUPPLEMENT 

SATELLITES 



"Space Mirrors," which could bounce TV, audio, and data communications from orbiting 
positions about 100 miles high, are being developed by a University-of-Oregon professor in 
cooperation with Stanford Research Institute. The reflectors, two to five meters in diameter, 
would be made of ultra-fine wire and held stationary above Earth by the pressure of electronic 
radiation. Although the space mirrors would be passive reflectors, they could be adapted to 
transmit signals. The big attraction is that they could cost as little as $10 million — less than 
20% of the price of a conventional communications satellite — and there would be lower 
launch costs. 

Prof . Paul Csonka, who developed the space-mirror concept, foresees use of the low-flying 
dishes as particularly attractive in parts of the world which don't have the need or finances for 
full-scale satellite services. The reflective dishes could bounce signals between points up to 
1000 miles apart— which is far less than the footprint covered by today's geostationary 
orbiting satellites. The space-mirror study was underwritten by equipment-maker EMCEE, 
which holds the patent rights to it. Further research, expected to continue through early 1 984, 
is now under way to iron out some technical problems with the orbiting reflector. 



SATELLITE TV 

CORP. OKAYED 

FOR DBS; 1986 

TARGET DATE 
REMAINS 



Satellite Television Corp. has received FCC approval to begin its first phase of construction 
for a national direct-broadcast satellite system. The FCC action gives STC a slight head start 
on the other eight companies which have received preliminary FCC approval to begin 
developing DBS sen/ices. If ail goes according to plan, STC could put up its first DBS bird by 
early 1 986, ready to serve viewers In the eastern time zone. The FCC was expected to begin 
action on the other DBS applications within a few weeks after okaying STC's plan. The DBS 
systems operate in the i2/14-GHz band. 

The FCC authorization doesn't include launch go-ahead, frequency allocations or orbital 
slots for STC's direct broadcast birds. Those matters will be addressed after the June 1 983 
western hemisphere Regional Administrative Radio Conference, which will sort out DBS 
assignments for North and South American nations, 

STC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Comsat, has already begun to make plans for its DBS 
service, which the company predicts will cost $680 million to build. By the end of the first year 
of operation, about 650,000 subscribers should be buying the service (for about $20 per 
month) which will offer three channels of pay-TV, education, and other programming. 

In an unrelated development, Oak Industries has delayed its DBS plans. The company had 
hoped to get an early start on DBS sometime in 1 984, using a Canadian satellite until its own 
bird could be launched in 1 986. But further tests showed that the Canadian satellite wouldn't 
be strong enough to cover Oak's target audience, even using a higher-powered transmitter 
like those that are currently available on U.S. birds. Oak is still proceeding with its 1 986 DBS 
plans. 



PROMISING 

PREDICTIONS 

ABOUT 

SATELLITE USE, 

LOWER PRICES 



o 

z 
o 

EC 
h- 
O 
LU 
—J 
UJ 

o 

Q 

< 



Fearless forecasters continue to envision a bright future for satellite services, including lower 
prices (or many facilities. For example, SPACE (The Society for Private and Commercial 
Earth Stations) foresees another $1 ,000 drop in prices for a typical earth station this year; 
SPACE estimates that the average home-satellite user now spends about $4,500 to set up 
equipment, which itself is a dramatic drop from a year ago when the typical start-up costs ran 
as high as $7,000. In all, that means a sophisticated 4/6-GHz private receiving system will 
cost about $3,500 bythe end of 1983 — and, of course, many systems will be built for far less. 
Meanwhile, SPACE is also estimating that about 4000 new dishes are being installed each 
month, adding to the 60,000 or so units now in place. Moreoever, another 250,000 homes are 
seeing bird-fed programming via Satellite Master Antenna TV systems (SMATV) in apart- 
ments, condos and other multi-home dwelling units. 

If the rapid growth of current satellite-reception technology seems staggering, there's an 
even bigger explosion ahead when Direct Broadcast Satellites are in full swing. By 1990, 
more than 15 million rooftop DBS receivers will be installed, according to a report from 
International Resource Development. The DBS facilities will make the present backyard 
terminals all but obsolete, IRD says. They also predict that the business of building and 
installing the small DBS dishes will be almost totally controlled by large satellite-industry firms 
such as Hughes, Harris, Scientific-Atlanta, and RCA. B-E 



12 



The more 

logical way to look 

inside an IC 



LTC Logical Analysis Test Kits: 
everything you need for over 
90% of your digital testing. 

Everything you need is at your finger- 
tips. Circuit-powered. And easy to use. 
Ready to read logic activity at a glance, 
point-by-point or IC by IC. Or to inject digital 
signals for testing. 

Let the LEDs of our Probes, Pulsers and 
Logic Monitors light the way to answers for your 
troubleshooting, design and educational needs. 
The Logical Analysis Test Kit connes in two 
versions: our $270.00* High-Speed Kit, LTC-2, 
which captures pulses as narrow as 6 nsec, rep 
rates to 60 MHz; and our $240.00* Standard Kit, 
LTC-1 , which goes to 50 nsec, 1 MHz. Both 
include complete manuals, accessories and a 
compact, custom-molded case, Either way 
you've got a strong case for simplified 
digital testing. 

Smarter tools for 
testing and design. 



Our 23-oz. Logical Analysis Test Kits include 

Logic Probe, Digital Pulser, Logic Monitor, complete 
manuals and accessories, plus case. 




GLOBAL 
SPECIALTIES 

CORPORATION 

70 Fulton Terr , New Haven, CT 06509 [203J 624-3103, TWX 710-465-1227 
OTHER OFFICES: San Francisco (415) B48-0611, TWX 910-372-7992 
Europe: Phone Satfron-WaWen 0799-21682, TLX 817477 
Canada: Len Finkler Ltd., Downsview, Ontario 

Call toll-free for details 1 -800- 243- 6077 

"Suggested US. resale Available at selecied local disuibutois. Prices, specificaiions subject to ctiange wiltiout notice. 
O Copyright 1980 Global Specialties Corporation. 
See us It EDS, Booth #s 020, 22, 24 & 26. CIRCLE 26 ON FREE INFOFIMATtON CARD 



VIDEOGAMES 



A tale of two synthesizers 

DANNY GOODMAN, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 



MATTEL AND ODYSSEY HAVE !N- 

troduced us to a new technology that will 
add new excitement to home videogames: 
elect[x>nic speech synthesis. Both voice 
boxes are complementary add-ons to their 
respective consoles. They are attached to 
the game system through the cartridge 
slot, and game cartridges, in turn, plug 
into the voice add-ons. Both synthesizers 
use the same high quality speech tech- 
nique from Texas Instruments, called 
Linear Predictive Coding (LPC). LPC al- 
lows different voices and accents to be 
stored digitally in ROM (fiead-Only 
Memory) IC's that are packed inside the 
game cartridges. 

Despite the similarities, the two com- 
panies have entirely different philosoph- 
ies on how to approach videogames using 
voice. That diversity is not so much in 
hardware (although Iiiiellivoice plays 
through the TV speaker and the Odyssey 2 
voice module, shown in Fig. 1, has its 
own built-in speaker) but in the specially 
coded software cartridges that make the 
modules move their electronic lips. 

Odyssey's voice cartridges are initially 
aimed at educational applications, 
although one popular action cartridge, 
UFO, is reportedly being re-designed to 
incorporate voice. One of the educational 



cartridges. Type and Tell, lets the "play- 
er" type in any word, name, or jutnble of 
letters, and the synthesizer attempts to 
speak the word — expletives not deleted. 

But most of the Odyssey 2 voice car- 
tridges for action games will be compat- 
ible with the same console without the 
voice module. That is, the cartridge will 
be playable without the module. That 
way, Odyssey believes, those without 
The Voice will still have the opportunity 
to play all the cartridges. 

Mattel, on the other hand, seems to 
take the position that voice should be an 
integral part of the game play. In its voice 
cartridge B-/7, for example, you're busy 
watching for ground targets below the 
plane when the plane's co-pilot alerts you 
that there are bandits at 3 o'clock. With 
that verbal alert, you know ht>w to change 
your screen view to get the bandits in your 
gunsight. Some of the voices on that car- 
tridge, however, are purely for decora- 
tion, like when the bombardier shouts 
"Bombs away!" 

My initial reaction is that the Mattel 
approach will appeal to more Imellivision 
owners than the Odyssey idea will attract 
Odyssey 2 owners. While it's "neat" to 
have a talking game, there is more in- 
centive to go the voice route if the voice is 




integrated into the game play, instead of 
being put on only for extra trimming. One 
driving force behind all videogame de- 
velopment is the player's demand for 
more — more detailed graphics, greater 
strategic realism, and more challenges. If 
an electronic voice adds to those di- 
mensions of the game, then there is a real 
incentive to invest in the voice add-on. 
Atari is forecasting a speech add-on for 
the 5200 for 1983. I hope the software 
designers are doing more than just adding 
a Howard Cose 11 voice coming from the 
press box of a football game. 



Fox Video Game's 

Worm War I 

for Atari 2600 




CIRCLE 101 ON FHEE INFORMATION CARD 



FIG. 1 



Fox Video Games Worm War 1 














SOUND LX^XX^J 








£jtS£l 1 1 1 1 1 1 








OF LEARNING MBBBBB^^ 










.,.- ..-1 1 r 1 Ti 1 










lilahUlsUlyls 


9 


lo! 


^y<i^^ 



You might expect games coming from 
Twentieth Century Fox to bear titles 
licensed from Fox's motion pictures. Not 
just yet, they tell me. In the meantime. 
Fox Video Games has jumped into the 
scene with four Atari VCS-compatible 
games designed by a respected 
personal -computer-software developer, 
Sirius Software. Worm Wor / is an 
Icoiiiiiiiied on page 21) 



14 



■iw-ffcr^ 




> 

-< 

CO 
CO 
CO 



CIRCLE 2S ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



15 



The future belongs to the creative electronics technician. 

NEWHWMNM 



GNnCHHO 



•i 




Be prepared to grow with the world's biggest 

growth industry. Enroll now in this exciting 

career program from the leader in 

electronics training. 



o 

z 
o 
cc 



m 

_i 

I 

o 

< 
16 



There are a lot of good jobi) out 
there in electronics. But the best jobs go to 
the people who can think and work crea- 
tively. Those who can conceive and desip 
circuits and equipment . . , those who can 
initiate ideas and carr>' them through ■ ■ ■ 
those who can turn theoretical concepts 
into reality. These are the people com- 
manding up to $18,000 as starting 
salaries, earning $30,000 or more with 
experience and ability. And NRl can help 
you join their company 

The First Complete 
Program of Its Kind 

Now, for the first time in the history 
of home study, NRl offers you a new and 
exciting course in Electronic Design 
Tfechnology. A course that starts witli tiie 
fundamentals and builds from there to 



prepare you for an electronic career where 
the growth is. You're trained for exciting 
jobs in the creation of communications 
equipment, computers, consumer prod- 
ucts, anything that needs electronic 
circuits. 

Only NRl gives you such complete 
and concentrated training in the design 
of electronic circuits. And you learn at 
home in your spare time, widiout quitting 
your job or wasting time, travel, and gas 
going to ni^t school. You learn widi NRl- 
developed training methods that combine 
knowledge with practical experience. 

NRl Circpit Designer Gives 
Hands-On Experience 

You learn by doing. No ivory-tower, 
strictly theoretical course here. You actu- 
ally design and build modern electronic 



circuits, run tests, and verify specs. You 
learn how various systems interact, design 
your own circuits to perform specific tasks, 



5 '/: Digit Liquid 

Crystal Display 




2000-Hour Bat- 
tery Operation 



4 Functions, 
13 Ranges 



Sliding Range 

and Function 

Switches 



.EIKTRONK 
lOGY TRAINING 



Multiple Power 
Supplies 



Variable Signal 
Generator 



Logic 
Switches 




LED Logic 
indicators 



Solderiess 
Breadboard 
Connector 



leam to look for better ways and new ideas. 
The NRI Circuit Designer is a totally 
unique instrument with full breadboard- 
ing capability, built-in multiple power 
supplies and a multi-function signal 
generator for circuit testing. Fast, simple 
connections let you build up prototype 
circuits, immediately check them out for 
function or faults. It handles both linear 
and digital integrated circuits as well as 
discrete components such as transistors 
and diodes. Six practical lab units carry 
you througli both the theoretical and prac- 
tical world of electronic circuit design. 

Professional Working 
Instruments 

Your course also includes the profes- 
sional multimeter with 3V2-dlgit liquid 
crystal di^lay to give you fast, accurate 
readings of voltage, current, and resis- 
tance. Slide switches let you select range 
and fonction quickly and easily You also 



get the famous Tfexas 
Instruments TI-30 
engineering cal- 
culator to speed and 
simplify circuit analysis 
and design. It's a true 
engineering instru- 
ment that includes 
trigonometric 
functions as well 
as square root, 
logarithms, and 8- 
memory Ibgether 
with your Circuit De- 
signer, they work to 
give you a sound basis of 
practical experience. 

NRI Fast-ltack 
Training 

Although the NRI Elec- 
tronic Design technology program carries 
you throu^ advanced electronics, the 
unique NRI lesson concept simplifies 
and speeds learning. Especially written 
for individual instruction, each lesson 
covers its subject Mly and thoroughly But 
extraneous material is eliminated, lan- 
guage is clear and to the point, organi- 
zation is logical and effective. 

You'll start with subjects like Fun- 
damentals of Electronic Circuits, pro^^ss 
rapidly through Circuit Theory to Solid- 
State Electronics and on to Digital Elec- 
tronics, Computers, and Microprocessors. 
Hand in hand with your theory will be 
practical Design Lab experiments, circuit 
demonstrations, and test/measurement 
procedures that make it all come to life. 

No Experience Necessary 

You need absolutely no electronic 
experience to be successful with this mod- 
em course. If you're a high school 
graduate with some algebra, you should 
handle it without any trouble. We even 
include, at no extra charge, the fJRI Math 



Refresher Module, deigned to help you 
brush up on your math and teach you any 
new concepts you may need from basic 
algebra through phasors and dicuit 
analysis. 

Free Catalog, 
No Salesman \m] CaU 

There's so much to tell you about 
this exciting new course for the electronic 
80's, we can't do it ail bsie. Send the 



Digit LED 



Trig and Log 
Functions 



Battery 
or AC 




T- , TT, K, 

and more 



Memory 

Registers 



posti^e-paid card for our free, 100-page 
catalog with all the facts about this and 
other NRI electronics courses. We'll rush it 
right to you without obligation. Look it 
over and discover for yourself why only 
NRI can prepare you so well for your 
future. If card has been removed, please 
write to us. 



NRI SCH00I5 

McGraw-Hill Continuing 

Education Center 
3939 Wisconsin Ave. 
Washington, DC. 20016 



We'll give you tomorrow. 




5 

CO 

19 




Workaholics. 



Beckman DMMs 
stay on the job when 
others call it quits. 
They're a hard-nosed 
breed of 3'!4 digit hand- 
held multimeters yoo can 
always count on for out- 
standing performance. 

Staying power 

Beckman DMMs 
work up to 2000 hours 
on a common 9V battery. 
That's ten times longer 
than other DMMs. And 
to prevent burnout on 
the job, Beckman DMMs can withstand 1500 Vdc loads 
and 6kV transients. Current ranges are protected with a 
2A/250V fuse, and resistance ranges are protected up 
to 500 Vdc. 

Easy to worfc with 

No matter how hard they work, they're never hard to 
work with. Their single rotary switch makes function and 
range selection simple and sure. For your added conve- 
nience, most Beckman DMMs have built-in 10-Amp capa- 
bility and hista-ohms* continuity indication. That means 
you never have to carry an accessory shunt or wait for a 
continuity check. 



SELECTION CHART 



I. 


SWetAL reATURES 


BASIC 

DC 
ACCU- 
flACY 


INSTA. 
OHMS* 


10 AMPS 


SUQ-J 

aESTEq 

RETAIU 

pflicil 

(U.S.)| 


Tech 300 


Basic SIX functions 


0.5% 






$120 


Tech 310 


Added features 


0.25% 


t^ 


P* 


145 


Tech 3I0UL 


UL-listed 


0.25% 


u* 


*> 


155 


Tech 320B 


Audible continuity beeper 


0.1% 


1^ 


V* 


189 


Tech 330 


High accuracy & true RMS 
(AC & DC) 


0.1% 


n^ 


%^ 


219 


HD-100 


Heavy duty (drop-proof, 
contamination-proof) 


0.25% 


l^ 




169 


HD-UO 


Heavy duty, plus 10 Amps 


0,25% 


V 


C 


189 



And to make sure 
that the job is done 
right the first time, 
Beckman DMMs have 
superior RF shield- 
ing, and an impressive 
22 Meg-ohm input 
impedance that re- 
duces circuit loading 
to ensure accurate 
readings. 

No matter how 
much the job de- 
mands, you can count 
on Beckman DMMs 
to see you through. 
There's a Beckman DMM just right for every application. 
Use the selection chart to find the model best for you. 

For a closer look at the workaholics, see your 
local Beckman distributor today. To locate the one nearest 
you, call or write Beckman Instruments, Inc., 
Instrumentation Operations, 210 S. Ranger Street, Brea, 
CA 92621. (714) 993-8803. 



BECKMAN 



CIRCLE 41 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



VIDEOGAMES 



continued from page 14 



unusual creation that pits a conventional 
tank against a horde of not-so- 
conventional giant worms that wiggle 
back and forth across the screen. The 
worms, plus other wall-like obstacles on 
higher levels, scroll from top to bottom, 
giving you the illusion of tank motion 
down a wide avenue. You control 
left-right movement of the tank and the 
scrolling speed. 

The object is to clear off each 
successive wave of wriggly worms. If one 
scrolls off the bottom, it ' 'wraps around' ' 
and re-appears at the top for another 
chance. Each wave materializes on the 
screen, along with an occasional gas 
station. 

Gas station? Yes, your tank's fuel 
supply is limited, so you've got to pass 
though a station (more like a garage door) 
as quickly and as squarely in the center as 
possible to pick up the most fuel . As you 
soon learn, it's not so easy to hit a moving 
worm in the right spot on purpose, but it's 
all too easy to blast away a garage by 
accident. 

The worm graphics are not greatly 
detailed, but the worms are unique in their 
movement. To some players, a fresh 
wave of worms will look like an 
oscilloscope pattern run amok. The sound 
consists of blaring barrages similar to the 
Yar's Revenge sequence after hitting the 
elusive Qotile. 

Worm War I may not rank among the 
all-time great VCS cartridges, and 
inexperienced players may find the 
difficulty progression rather fast, but the 
original scenario and game play make it a 
worthy addition to larger libraries. 

Parker Brothers' Frogger 
Jumps to the Atari 2600 

Frogger was one of those non- 
combatant arcade games that helped draw 
quarters from the female audience once 
Pac-Man had whetted their appetites. 
The game's scenario was cute and simple: 
get the frog across a busy highway and a 
river in 30 seconds. Controlling the frog 
meant simply moving him forward, 
backward, left or right — ^just like a maze 
game. In spite of its simple scenario, and 
ease in picking up how the game works, 
the game advances rapidly into harrowing 
experiences for that homebound frog. 

There is a lot going on on a Frogger 




CIRCLE 102 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



^m 


Parker Brothers Frogger 






GRAPHICS 


1 1 1 ) 1 1 1 [ 1 


J 


SOUND 


^^^^M 






EASS 
OF LeARNING 


■■■■■■■■■■ 


1 


CHALtENGE 


II 






1 1 1 [ 1 1 i 1 








^ 


I]2j3|*|5|6|7|8|9jl0 


^^p^^'^^^^^ 









screen, especially in the river. That 
includes things like moving logs, turtles 
that dive (disappear) into the water, 
alligators, snakes, lady frogs, and flies 
(the last two account for bonus points). 
When Parker Bros, announced it had 
purchased the rights to Frogger from 
Sega/Gremlin, I had some doubts as to 
how much of the original could be 
convincingly transferred to an Atari VCS 
cartridge, given that system's limited 
memory and graphics-addressing 
capabilities. However, I was pleasantly 
surprised when I finally saw Parker's 
rendition. With the exception of one 
hazard (the otters), Parker's Frogger 



manages to capture most of the subtleties 
of the original graphics. More 
importantly, the game play is at least as 
challenging as the arcade version, with 
the difficulty increasing at a brisk but not 
frustrating pace. 

One advantage of the home game over 
the arcade version is the number of game 
levels available. The cartridge contains 6 
variations, three each for one and two 
players, called "easiest" (not that easy), 
''more difficult," and "speedy." In 
"speedy," frogger continues to jump in 
one direction as long as you push the 
joystick that way. In other games, it's one 
push of the joystick per jump. VCS 
difficulty-switches also give you the 
option of letting the frog scroll around the 
screen on turtles or logs, instead of biting 
the algae when it reaches the screen edge. 
That's highly recommended for novice 
players. 

Scoring is one- tenth that of the arcade 
version (e.g., 100 points for getting al! 
five frogs home vs. 1000 at the arcade). 
Extra frogs are earned- for every 1000 
points, up to a maximum of four reserve 
frogs at any time. That may sound more 
generous than the arcade game (only one 
extra Frogger at 2,000 equivalent 
points), but it indicates the greater 
challenge that the Parker Frogger 
cartridge offers. 

Players get a brief Frogger musical 
interiude between levels and the theme 
music at the game's outset. If you're 
intent on replaying the game, that intro 
music seems to take forever, but unlike 
Parker's Empire Strikes Back, you've got 
to wait for the music to stop before 
Frogger can start. 

Even if you've never played the arcade 
original, you'll enjoy Frogger, as will the 
young and novice game players in your 
home, R-E 




"Would vou like to hear mv secretary in .stero?" 



s. 
> 

< 



21 



LETTERS 



Address your comments to: Letters, Radio-Electronics, 
200 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10003 



DMWI ADD-ON 

In reference to the "DMM Add-On" ("New 
Ideas," October 1982 issue). I must admit 
that, for me, the article does not compute. 
There was no rationale given for the "divide 
4000 by tfie meter reading." 

By my logic, 1 would consider the simplified 
circuit to be as you see it in Fig. i . 

Consider Rx to be 100 megs; then R totai 
= 100 + 0.5025 = 100. 5025 megs. Totai 
current = 



8 



100,502,500 



0.0000000796 amperes. 

The DfvlM shoiild read the voltage drop 
across 0.5025 megs. E= IR = 
0.0000000796 x 502,500 = 0.039999005 
volts; that rounds out to 0.04 volts (meter 
reading). 




According to the article, 



4000 
Rx = ^^^^^ = 100,000 

0.04 



That is not 1 00 megohms! 

1 00 megohms can be derived by first de- 
termining the voltage drop across Rx = 8V - 
0.040V = 7,96V, Then 



i 0.0000000796 



100,000,000 



or 100 megohms. Or the formula could be 
used: 



Rx 



Enx 0.5025 megs 
Edmm 1 



JOSEPH S. RI2K 
Jacksonville, FL 

In the 200-mitlivolt range, the meter reading is 
40— not 0.04. To obtain the correct resist- 
ance in megohms, divide 4000 ijy the actual 
meter reading — not the voltage value. — 
Editor. 

AGREEMENT 

I agree with Mr. Joseph W, Miller's sugges- 
tion in the "Letters" section of the January 



FIRST QUALITY COMPONENTS - NOT MAIL ORDER "SECONDS" 




ARIES ZERO 
INSERTION 
FORGE 
SOCKETS - 



earn actuated, Irue zero 
insertion - Tin plaled solder 
■all pins - capabFe oi being 
plugged into dip sockets. 
including wife wrap. 



Stock N4. 4) 
No, Ptni 

1105? -40 



1-S 10*9 SO 

4.9B U-Hi 53-S& 

S,1& 4.M i.Hi 

a.fll 5.33 5.3S 

3,o:f 10. » 9.45 



UNJTRACK' d.u>»l* **o inl-C Prtc* 

0>i^r ? will* ffi h«3ilrD<n 3323S 14 S Ht 

EiffiKxa^"* mil !S a 

juii po«<iiCx:wi*f VI - 22^7 18 .S^ 

hf m i« £»i>«>itd fCHK edp 2222e ^0 .29 

and ballet cH (C infl 




DIGITAL MULTIMETER 
SiJigle mraryawilch op*<il 
■ion Large e^^ylO^^^d £ 
S-'^digiMiinioy SiDOhauj^ 
opvratlfHiilewilh idnQt^l)^ 
tUlieiy 5f*rn funcltOfii— 
IOCVdIH DCArlpS Ohms 
AT, Vo'lt AC *TiEMi diods 
and f^esi&IOr Junenon.Aud- 
iWt Ccnlinuilv Checkh 



WILD ROVER 

Touch iwi'icti capsule 
Op«raiingi Tiotiar^ n OOb Vfithoijl the 
use o' 3 leveivij a^m txtntm^\y l^si on 
and orr with t&w no^ie hlornjiiy open - 
ratBd 1 1 S VAC. I 6 ampSO miNiohm >^^- 
iiiiance - >G1 a radius by 1 SQ lh>Dk 
Stock NO- 1-9 10 a Up 

ISPSa SI. 42 S1.2S 



eOMO ROSIN CORE SOLDER 

Sl«Ch Lflngin W»'gM 



AOOTA OS? 

WOtT 0*1 

50o;q 03? 




Tl WIRE 

WRAP 

SOCKETS 

Tin ptated 
phosphor bronze 
contact - 3 wrap 
SlocK ^ __ 

hlQ. NoPlni ^"3S 

11301 fi S.40 

14 



1302 

ii3oa 

11304 
11 305 
1 1306 
113C7 

1 i;3dq 



59 
64 
,73 
99 

i.ia 

1.S2 
205 




SeniJfi.T rri.'.jCjl.TitK)- 
over 1 10D pans 



Tl LOW PROFILE 
SOCKETS 

Tin plated 
copper alloy 
ess conlaci pfns 
with gas tighl seal 

SiDCh 

NO. NoPi„, 1-24 25-99 
tiaoi 




>lSd£ 

11203 

11207 
1130fi 
11203 



$. 1 S.09 
.14 .13 
.16 
.18 
-SO 
.22 
.24 
.28 
.40 



.IS 
.17 
.18 
.20 
.22 
.26 
.37 



100 

999 
S.OB 
.12 
.14 
.15 
.16 
.IS 
.20 
.25 
.33 



in 

O 

z 
o 

CL 

\- 
O 

LU 



o 

Q 
< 

22 




ELPAC POWER SUPPLIES - DC/DC CONVERTERS 



Stock No. 13801 
-"Floppy Disc" 
Power Supply Foi 
Winchester Dnves 

$1 09?° 

13801-1 DataSheel 
lor 13801 ... .2S 



SINTEC ELPAC Ittput Oulpui □ulpul 

Stock N9. Ho. Waltjga VolE^v Cumnl 

300 HW Tit.* 4V0C] CWDC^ [HA] 

13329 Ca3BOl 3.0-7.0 l^zO.G 0-33 

Cfi3AT1 3.0-T.O -13±0.e 0-2S 

CB3a02 3.0-7.0 13±0.7 O-ZO 

CBJaU 30-7,5 -1S10.7 frap 

CB3804 3.0-7.0 ^«30.7 0-10 

OB3«i4 3.0-7.0 -ma.t 0-10 




CL3B01 d. 0-7.0 121-O.e 

CUBll <.0-7.0 -ia-tD.6 

CU3A02 4.0-r.O >3±0.T 

CU&13 J.O7.0 -15±0.7 

CUaO*J.OT.O 31 tl,* 

CL30H * O-T.O -33^1,4 

DATA SHEET FOR PC^OC COflVEnTCRS 55 



In 1iich*P Pne« 

.ASjT.S 1^3.09 3 7.03 

.48k.S1a3.05 T.0S 

.48K.51^3.05 T.85 

.4«K.5ir3.DS r.as 

.40K.5U3.05 T.aH 

.44K.3 1x3.03 7. as 

.osixi.sxi.ma^.as 

.»$li1.ai1.7? 34.33 

.0S1ir1.ant.T7 2A.BS 

.051 <1 ,3X1.77 3<,8S 

051 K1 .3*1 -77 7*.K 

.OKI Rl. ail. 77 34.35 



Special of the Month! 



PROFESSIONAL PRINTED 
CIRCUIT DESIGN :^:=^=^ 
KITS , , , . -- - . 

Evefything you 
need to get started 
crealing Instant ^^^itw 
PC boards.-. no. 

the convenient, \l^% iCSarSbLH 
economical way. I264i s-idd 
1 ?ft42 




Deicrjpjlon 



MOOUTEC 




ELPAC POWER SUPPLIES - SOLV SERIES FULLY REGULATED 




EL^J£ 
hnMa. 
SOLVl»') 
WLWiS'lS 
SOLViHJ 
KJLWIS'J^ 

SW.VSIM3 
SOLVSOIS 
tXH-fXyiA 



9- VI ■t-T /■■a' 31^14 



Oyp-* 

OVfJ 
OV^j4 



S9 95 



OK MACHINE AND TOOL ■ 




IC INSERTION/ 

EXTRACTION KIT 



t*«3i -nit and MHciiidr grou«D 



y 




PIN FORMING TOOL 
puis IC'son Iheir 
true row lo row 

spacing. One side is 

for 300 centers, Flip (ooi over fordevices 
on 600 centers Put device in too) and 
sque^re ^y Stock No. 1 0200 S1 4. 95 

ONE TOOL O^ES (ANTLSTATIC MODEL, 



8 thru 40 PINS: 



Stock No. 11059 S12.95 



SOCKET wnAPia ;™ ;-- 

OiP«iXk3;iir^«iIE^m<pa'wn 13K7 lAfHn 

^^ir.^u.iplwrtholin^p-iifle*- 13J1B Kimn 

?w»» 5i*e<^<e *«i4H b«»Pf*>wp 132^ ??-p.>i 

*ripp.«q to w»iMJ-| *r* AIM 13300 7* Ph" 

*r,1fu*ilP*rmo'tiC*l^.lCpa1 igaOl M p*i 

•Mlint*! lL«t'**l *l{ SiwipiT^'* 13107 40 [Ml 

f|^\M ttitw iVidWipii^ lua^Alr I3S&1 9&pi" 

•1 .fl2 per pack 




10 EXTRACTOR 

One-piece, spring sleel con- 
slrucl ion. Wl 1 1 extract a 1 1 LS I, M SI 
and SSL devices wilh S to 24 

oi"'- StocHNo. *o 10 




iDi 



Miniclamp AC VoH-AmmetAr 
allows Singling one conductor out oi 
many without disarrange rri en) 

SEoch Mo AC A(n|}ftr«& Pncfr 

^ 13710 D-25A S39 50 

11731 D-SOA :}9 SO 

13T3J OIOOA 39 SO 

ACCESSORY LINE SPLrTTER 
alcows last readtngis of AC power con- 

^rrpiton of plug in eqyiprreni with- 
out separation of leads ^ 

Stock No. 13737 $9. ^ 

POCKET SIZED 
BATTER V TESTER 
fof all lypes of small batleneslrom 
h135vlod5v ^^ - Q- 

Stock No, 13/33 ^ I <J.^ 
VOLT-I-CATOR 

auiomotive diagnostic metef plugs 
mio lighter sockel and indicates bal- 
tery condition and charging rales 

Slock No, 13736 $1 5.^^ 
AC VOLTAGE TESTER 
plugs into any 1 lOv service recepl- 
acle Ho check line voltaae over 50- 
150 VAC ^. - g 

Stock No, 13735 ^1 t|,*'^ 
VOM-MULTITESTER 

versatile VoU'Ofim-Milliamrneler in 
small package -t^j -^ qc 

Slock hlo. 13729 $1 3» 



Drawer Q Milford 
CO. NJ 08848-9990 



TOLL 800-526-5960 

FREE in NJ (201) 996-4093 



CIRCLE 82 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Use the POW^R within your reach! 



A new and unique magazine for the worid's 
most popular personal computer 




onty'S29.95 

Sal's $6,00! 

Plus receive 

tree 

software 

cassettel 



Now that you've got a TIM EX SINCLAIR 
computer make sure you get the new 
magazine that helps you to get the most 
out of It . . . TIMEX SINCLAIR USER! And 
take advantage of our special bonus of a 
free software cassette ($15.00 retail 
value) with each subscription. 
TIMEX SINCLAIR USER Is published 
monthly, it keeps you totally up-to-date. 
It helps you make full use of the power 
of your computer. 




TIMEX SINCLAIR 1000; the price and 
technology breakthrough that finally 
made computers affordable. 
TIMEX SINCLAIR USER: the magazine 
that helps you use the power of this 
revolutionary computer. 



spectrum of user interests. Education. . 
Business applications. Home manage- 
ment. Games and family entertainment. 
And TIMEX SINCLAIR USER does it in a 
easy-to-understand style that's 
authoritative yet friendly. 
Each Issue Is packed with articles and 
Information that help owners make use 
of the power of their computer. News 
about software releases. Reviews. Hard- 
ware developments. Reader question 
and answer column. Eight pages of pro- 
gram listings In every issue. New and 
unique user applications. How to pro- 
gram. Interviews. Special money saving 
offers to readers. 

In fact, all the latest ideas and informa- 
tion to ensure that new owners and ex- 
pert users never tire of their computer. 



FREE BONUS WITH YOUR 
SUBSCRIPTION 






i ■,-:- / VI- 3. 




"PacHrabbit" 

Retail value 

$15.00 



A good reason to order now! Receive a 
software program cassette of an ex- 
citing, new arcade game! "Packrabbit" 
is a regular $15.00 retail value. Free with 
subscriptions for a limited time only. 



For an 1/ age 
or experience 

Remember the TS1000 was designed 
precisely for you. Whatever your age and 
experience in computers, TIMEX 
SINCLAIR USER can help you use the 
power of your computer. 



SUBSCRIBE NOW and take advantage 
of our special offer. Only $29.95 for 12 
monthly Issues postage paid. This 
represents a $6.00 saving over regular 
newstand prices. And remember, you 
receive a FREE BONUS with every 
subscription, a "Packrabbit" software 
cassette ($15.00 retail value). 



To order call TOLL FREE 

800-543-3000 

Ask for Operator 243. In Canada call 
(513) 72a-4300 and ask for Operator 243. 
These numbers are for orders only. Have 
your VISA, or Mastercard card ready. 



Malt to TIMEX SINCLAIR USER, 49 La Salle Avenue, Buffalo, New York, 14214 



Name 



Address 
Clty^ 



. State 



.Zip. 




( ) Check 



( ) Money order. Or charge to 



( ) Visa ( ) Mastercard 



Number 



Expiry 

Signature. 



( ) Yes, I want to suttscrltie to TIMEX 
SINCLAIR USER at the special rate of $29.^ 
for 12 Issues delivered to my door. In addition I 
understand I will receive the FREE software 
cassette with my first Issue. 

RES 



1983 Radto-Electronics that you ease off 
computer articles. 

I am not a subscriber, but the newsstand 
saves me a copy every month, and I have a 
Radio-Etectronics file of several years' 
standing. I am a "hobbyist," retired (age 74), 
and have been in electronics and radio since 
1923. 

I have just refused to renew my subscrip- 
tion to another electronics magazine be- 
cause they devote too much space to com- 
puters. There is not a single magazine (to my 
knowledge) that is for the hobbyist; all have 
gone to computers. There are still a lot of us, 
believe it or not, who are not interested in 
computers, per se. 
GERALD HASSELL 
Brookhaven. NY 

FASTER THAN LIGHT 

In your January 1983 issue. Dr. Harold W. 
Milnes presents three experiments. He in- 
terprets the first two (and particularly the 
second) as "leading to one conclusion: An 
electrical signal in a conductor, under suit- 
able conditions of very low L and C values, 
can be made to pass through that conductor 
at a velocity considerably greater than that of 
light." He estimates it to be "greater than one 
hundred times the speed of light," 

The problem with the experimental setup is 
that the wire is not a straight wire. In both 
experiments, the wire forms loops (a multi- 
tude of loops in the first experiement. and one 
in the second). Those loops allow for in- 
ductive magnetic coupling — or rather mag- 
netic short-circuiting — of early parts of the 
wire with late parts of the wire. 



0-0 efe'' 




•LA^£g( 
Lft-ftR, 3 


A. 


■LASEI14 J 


m . 


^ 



FIG. 2 

Although the wire length is 400 meters, the 
magnetic length is only of the order of one 
meter or less (depending on the connecting 
wires). That can be seen in Figs. 2-a and 2-b 
below, which correspond respectively to the 
experiments. The magnetic lines show how 
the mutual magnetic inductive coupling 
occurs, and how a magnetic short-circuiting 
of the ends of the wire ensues. (Another way 
to examine that short-circuiting consists of 



considenng the stepwise EMF induced in one 
end of the wire by the stepwise magnetic field 
of the stepwise current in the other end.) Us- 
ing coaxial cable would remove the 
electromagnetic coupling of the early and late 
pails of the wire. 
DR. MICHEL G, BOUGON 
The Pennsylvania State University, 
University Parii, PA 

MICROPROCESSOR-BASED 

DEVICES 

I have read the January issue of Radlo- 
Electronlcs, and find it to be superb, as 
usual. I am always very interested in con- 
struction articles, and have been hoping to 
see some on how to design microprocessor- 
based devices. Your article, "How To In- 
terface Microprocessors" w/as fine — but too 
short! I would very much like to see that article 
expanded into a multipart series, so that 
those of us who are not thoroughly familiar 
with micros can be enlightened as to the 
hardware aspects of those devices. 

I am certainly not suggesting that Radio- 
Electronics become a computer magazine. 
Heaven forbid! I do, however think that a 
regular monthly series of construction articles 
based on the more common microprocessors 
would prove to be extremely valuable to your 
readers. After all, it is getting to the point 
where anyone working in the area of digital 
electronics must "know" micros, I have found 
the micro to be such a useful device that it 
would be a real loss not to continue to provide 
your readers with applications information. 
DANIEL R. TAYLOR 
Orlando, FL 



CO 
O 



O 



o 

UJ 



Q 

Q 

24 




One source 

for thousands 

of VCR parts. 



RCA VCR parts are available from more than 600 
authorized RCA parts distributors. See your local 
RCA distributor for RCA's new VCR parts kits — 
they're easy to use and reuse. Each package 
has a handy slide top — and features detailed 
cross-references to other manufacturers' 
model numbers and stock numbers. 

One more thing. Kit prices are lower than 
the totai cost of the individual parts. So see 
your RCA distributor today. Also ask for a 
copy of the VCR Parts Cross Reference of 
more than 6000 VCR parts {Form 
1 F6627) and VCR Tool Catalog (Form 
1F6857). Or write: RCA Distributor and 
Special Products Division, 2000 Clements 
Bridge Road, Depttord, NJ 08096. 



Service more than 95 RCA and otKer brand 
models with these VCR Parts Kits: 

199094 Belt Kit, 199095 Beit Kit . 199096 Lamp Kit , 199097 Fuse Kit 



RCil 



VCR 
Parts 



"I built this 16-bit computer and 
saved money. Learned a lot, too," 



Save now by building the Heathkit H-100 
yourself. Save later because your computer 
investment won't become obsolete for 
many years to come. 

Save by building it yourself. You can save hundreds of 
dollars over assembled prices wfien you choose the new 
H-100 16-Bit/8-Bit Computer Kit money you can use 
to buy the peripherals and software of your choice. 



H-100 SERIES COMPUTER SPECIFICATIONS: 



USER MEMORY: 
128K-768K bytes 

MICROPROCESSORS: 
16-bit: 808S 
8-bit: 8085 

DISK STORAGE: 
Built-in standard 
5.25 disk drive, 
320K bytes/disk 

KEYBOARD: 
Typewriter-style, 
108 keys, 13 
function keys, 
18-key numeric pad 

GRAPHICS: 

Always in graphics mode. 

640h(225v resolution; 

up to eight colors 

arc available 

COMMUNICATIONS: 

Two RS-232C Serial 
Interface Ports and 
one parallel port 

12aKby1es standard. 
Optional. 



DIAGNOSTICS: 
Memory self -test 
on power-up 

AVAILABLE SOFTWARE: 

Z-DOS (MS-DOS) 

CP/M-85 

Z-BASIC Language 

Microsoft BASIC 

Multlplan 

SuperCalc 

WordStar 

MailMcrge , 

Data Base 

Manager 

Most 

standard ,* 

8-bit CP;M 

Software 



The H-100 is easy to build - the step-by-step Heathkit 
manual shows you how. And every step of the way, you 
have our pledge - "We won't let you fail." Help is as close 
as your phone, or the nearest Heathkit Electronic Center,'^ 

And what better way to learn state-of-the-art computing 
techniques than to build the world's only 16-bit/8-bit 
computer kit? To run todays higher-speed, higher-per- 
formance 16-bit software, you need an H-100. It makes a 
big difference by processing more data faster. 
Dual microprocessors for power and compatibility. The 
H-100 handles both high-performance 16-bit software 
and most current Heath Zenith 8- bit software. 
Want room to grow? The H-100s standard 128K byte 
Random Access Memory complement can be expanded 
to 768 K bytes compared to a 64 K standard for many 
desktop computers. 

And the industry-standard S-100 card slots support 
memory expansion and additional peripheral devices, 
increasing future upgradability of the H-100. 

High-capacity dtsk storage. too.The H-100's 5.25Tloppy 
disk drive can store 320K bytes on a single disk. The 
computer also supports an optional second 5.25" and 
external 8" floppy disk drives. And an optional internal 
Winchester disk drive will be available soon. 
For more information, circle the reader service number 
below. Better yet, visit your Heathkit Electronic Center for 
a demonstration! 



The H-100 gives me the most 
for my computer dollar! 




Heathkit 



Hesthtiit Electronic Centers »« units ot V«ftii>|j|ji0(lligy Electronics Corpotation. 

Heath Company and Veri technology ElcelroiiICBC6n)Or!i"°n3re subsidtafies ot Zenith Hadio Corporation 



EQUIPMENT REPORTS 



Model 8060 A Dl 




Fluke 8060A 1 


OVEKAU. 
PRICE 


^ 


■""P 


-1 








n 


EASE 


n 


















OF USE 


V .-^ 








* 


sc. 


INSTRUCTION 


■■■■■ 










1 


MANUAL 




-r 






r 


/vALUi 












■ 


1|2[3U[5|6|7 


8 


91(4 


-^^^-^1 



CIRCLE tOS ON FnEE,i 



ION CARD, 



LONG A MANUFACTURER OF SMAl-L, 

high-quality, and useful digital multimet- 



ers, The John Fluke Co. (PO Box C9090, 
Everett, WA 98206) has outdone itself 



with its lalest DMM, the model &06Q. 
Actually, rather than a DMM, we think 
this instrument should be called a 
DMPM, or a Digital Multi-Z'urpose 
Afeter, as it not only features the "stan- 
dard" DMM functions, but also a few 
more that are definitely not standard. In 
fact, it will do so many things that we're 
going to concentrate on some of the more 
unusual ones. 

Briefly, the unit is a hand-held, 
microprocessor-based, 4'/t digit DMM, 
with a nice big LCD display. AC readings 
are true RMS up to a frequency limit of 
100 kHz. Voltages, either AC or DC, can 
be displayed in dBm referenced to 600 
ohms, or in relative dB. A relative refer- 
ence (or offset) feature works with all of 
the meter's functions. When that feature 
is used, a reading is stored as a zero refer- 



SANYO 

STK-435 

$410 




SANYO 

STK-437 
$C50 




SEMICONDUCTORS 



2ENER DIODE KIT 

ZDK-23 

Most popular zener diodes in kit of 23 
Plastic Cabinet 



SANYO 



TOSHIBA 



11 



95 




2SC1308K 
$-199 



1 



2SC1172B 

$-199 



i 



Bin 

WW 

BKU 
B321 

e»r 
bar 
iu» 

BJil 

B»; 



BUS 



C3K ^0 

CU] <« 

CMT* a 

C3HA V 

C4Si U 

C^H 1 H 

C*K M 

C4M At, 

an 1 » 

cat 1« 

CHS HI 

CKf I n 

CAW I » 

do i« 

cm n 

ctn ^* 

cm n 

c?»* «« 

Cnr KM 



cm 
an 

CUDM 
CUfl 

Ci» 

CS40 
ZtkfA. 
C*H 

ClOlf 
CI02S 
Ct034 

CSCHT 

Clt14 



am 



i:i?i?A 


M 


i^iM 


» 


CHr^ 


3 51 


KAl13t 


<x 


STKcon 


?H 


T47IHAP 


nr 


cuu 


l» 


Ciii'J 


•■ 


D^n 


» 


MhMfrt 




STKWO 


&■/ 


fAJTjK* 




C1J*5 




C7M1 


» 


DS« 


W 


HAIlUiW 


i» 


£TPL«« 


TitW 


fAniOP 


!03 


C1I»* 




C30» 


1H 


OH* 




NAItH 


i» 


STMU 


JIO 


IC*(IB1P 


il 


C1JM 


i» 


c»t* 


•if 


OWi 


iii 


nAnar 


i2t 


STWii 


3HI 


TCM4V 


S« 


Cl??l 


« 


M1M 


»? 


HHA 


1 I.|> 














CTX4 


*» 


SSONt 


H 


l»H^ 


1 M 




?t 


STKtHth 


?« 




JiJ 


CtTOT 




DPT 


B 


OKU 




MA>3qj 


»> 


STRIXJ 


IH 


iJri.C«it 


4fir 






DW 








HAtX*W 


:ot 


5TM71 


ITS 


UMJCWfl 


*BT 


Cillfr 


340 










W*i3i» 


J^S 


5TK0» 


JK 


UWiMW 


*fl7 






onr 


?Si 


Otti 


** 






STKi30 


110 




4CIF 


CiJX 


a 


01 H 


l»ft 






H*I3JSA 


1*4 


STKi33 


4« 


yPC4iC 


3 1* 














Mftii*?* 


1«4 


ST»l*15 


^HJ 


LIPC15TA 


!H 


CllM 


J3 










Hil»1 


}« 


STUiJ? 


s» 


UPC*WC 


;i5 


CiSftA 


A 


D?«A 


iO 


tSkaj, 


« 


HA13e4W 


i« 


StKlA 


b» 


ypcwsH 


*i 
















irt 


STKrtS 


ffii 


UPC4I1C 


?44 






M3* 








MAI 37? 


JB3 


STKISOJ 


?» 


uPGifsc: 


«10 


CltOlA 


371 










HA13H 


JH 


5TK503 


?w 


UP«Ti*i 


3 IB 


CtflJA 


<fff 


Ml 3 


*s 


AM}4 7 


7m 


LA1X5 


r» 


TAJ»SP 


1 H 


UPC^TFH 


JJ 


cmv 


U 


oin 






7n 


lAsaJB 


MO 


TAFoew 


?0 


yPCiwM 


4J 














LAJlASP 


>H 


T^KHiKP 


H 


UKICOIM 


}« 


CibilA 


K 










l*4iM 


tM 


T*TOB 


5* 


UPCIOOfC 


3M 


C1H<JL 


IlXi 


Disr 




AH3M 


1 >ai 


LA**30 


«» 


TA^HP 


3» 


ifl^;30i«: 


?" 






D5» 


fl* 




w 




IM 


lAnMAP 


JM 


WPCIOJQH 


3M 






&MI 






1« 


M11&14B1. 


lU 


lAmPV 


3M 


upciayifl 


<« 


Ciir» 


■n 










UB^ns 


IV 


T*;t!OP 


» 


UPClOSC 


H 


ono 


■7 


0*W 


301 


*Nriw 


J 31 


«B3?t: 


111 


t Air IMP 


S? 


ypci«;*i 


n 


dtn 


11 


tH» 




BAtllA 


lU 


MB3W 


Jf* 


iA7jqiP 


sai 


yKiiiwH 


?o 












t?J 


MuraA 


Its 


TA^MIP 


2» 


UPCl 'iit* 


iH 


CiHSi 


» 










HBtm 


■ Pt 


TA1!0*P 


135 


UPC1>»>4 


>« 


C1«HI 


3» 




1i 
1* 


BAIJIO 
HAIPJhN 




^IPfA 

ntajA 


• 14 


T4TKI&AP 

T*F7HP 


1 ?0 

1*1 


UFCiitm 


i» 


C1«1 


1 u 



IIPCMUH ]tl 

UPC11I6M 14# 

Lj4>C»U 1 O 

U*C1*»i I T* 

UPMSJ- II W 

l/POSH 4U 

UKHBIC ^17 

IMOOES 

GMJF H 

S^tUQIl »» 



1fr1» 
iJflW 
\2,■^<A 
IM« 
IMCO 

i&'m 

3i3^iCO 



lN4<U4 

IWW6 
iruCo:' 

■ILICOHE 

HECTIFLEn 

Si l« 1IW10I> 



ELECTRONICS 

770 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY 10025 

»- Also ask for Free 100 Page Catalog ■< 

r J. ' I 



Send Purchase Order, Check or Money Order 

or Call Toll Free 800-223-0826 

in NY STATE (212) 865-5580 
Alt ORDERS SHIPPED UPS/COD F.O.8., N.Y.C. 

MASTER CARD • VISA 



^X: 



3C 



^SX 



nnri f ■;■> rvu pbfc lucneuftTtnw r:ARr^ 



Gillaspie Continues Industry Leadership . . 

WITH A 6- FOOT ANTENNA SYSTEM THAT WORKS! 

- AND MAKES SATELLITE TV AFFORDABLE NOW! 



on't be Fooled by the Low Price. 

he Gillaspie is not a toy or kit you have to 
isemble. It is a complete system which includes 
le same 6- foot "dish" antenna which was the 
snsation of the recent Satellite TV Trade Show 
I Atlanta. Of some 150 antennas demonstrated, 
om 8-foot to 20-foot diameter, Gillaspie's was 
le onty 6-foot Sophisticated t.v. engineers 
pproached this easily installed antenna, suit- 
hie for nearly any home, in utter disbelief, hut 
leir skepticism vanished when they viewed the 
tudio-monitor quality pictures it delivered 
'hen coupled to the Gillaspie 7 600 A receiver 
aat is the heart of your GULaspie Satellite TV 
larth Station. 

lere are just some of the advantages you'll enjoy 
nth Gillaspie's new 6-foot antenna: 



/ 



/ 






v/ 



An aesthetically pleasing appearance in 

your yard or on your roof. 

Easy mounting where larger dishes can not 

go, such as rooftops, apartments, condos 

and even R.V.'s! 

CompEes with more local zoning ordinances. 

Greater safety, even in had weather. 

Easily moved when you do. 

Commercial- grade spun aluminum . . . just 

like the professional antennas used by 

cable systems and t.v. stations. 

Will not rust, warp or lose accuracy. 



7S00A 

3700 lo <20O MHj 

* FuL! frequency luiubic 
Budio tor »1l nubciriienu S 

* SicnpHHvd dwrnwl tunmt 

* Built-in video moduktor 

* Improved vid*o p*rfor- 
QijincD cl«uilry 

* Auusmocjc frvqurncy 

Ifvd! mvlvr 

* Mj*e\ivt bU wood cjibinet 

* Oprinitivc GL]la«pii> 
quality contrt>l 



6 Foot AnlcnnH 

* ZHiffK gam 

* Dinct broadrasl appti£Jiiion 

* Eau of infltaUdliun 

* Ctkuplftc odxtol ccvmce 

* Prtci*ion ipun aluminum 
refleclor 

* Hot dipped EBlvsmKcd 

* Hot dipped f£Alvttnii«d or 
itflinksA steel lurdvpre 



Perhaps Only a Receiver as Good as the 
Gillaspie can deliver good video from a 6-foot 
antenna, but deliver it does, and we guarantee it 
with our money-back- if-not-aatiafied warranty*. 
The Gillaspie 7 600 A receiver has been proven 
the standard of the industry with over 8.000 
units in use by t,v. stations, cable systems, indus- 
trial users, and individuals throughout the 
world. 




The Model 7600 A Satellite Receiver is the 

new look from Gillaspie, state of the art technol- 
ogy, distinctively styled, successful integration 
of the most sought after high performance 
characteristics and ease of operation capa- 




bilities. Attractively packaged, affonJably priced, 
experience the difference performance makes! 
The Model 7600A introduces more high perfor- 
mance characteristics to its price range than ever 
before, like uni- board construction for maximum 
reliabihty and easier service, fuD frequency tun- 
able audio for cleaner erisper sound with less dis- 
tortion, a new temperature compensated oscillator 
to eliminate drift, advanced circuit design for 
improved video sensitivity, and more. 



Cittaspie & Assoinates 

369 Sao Aleso Avenue, Sunn>i,'ate, CA 940»6 

Distributed by: 



Multi- Vision 
Oakridge, TN 
(800> 351-3000 

North American 

Satellite 

Fresno, CA 

(209) 431-4936 



Nevada Satellite 
Las Vegas, NV 
(702) 452-5509 

Satellite 

Communications Corp. 

Silverlake, KS 

(913) 582-5819 



On the 7600A All Channel Selections are 
controlled from the comfort of your easy- chair by 
the convenient optional remote control unit. Ask 
your dealer about handy satellite program 
guides, published weekly and monthly. Pro- 
visions have been made for sharing of an antenna 
among neighbors tor even further savings! 
Sounds Too Good to Be True: Is It Legal? 
Perfectly, as long as you don't charge admission 
and open a theatre in your home. The Federal 
Communications Commission has specifically 
de-regulated satellite tv. reception by private 
individuals for personal enjoyment. 
The Gillaspie Model 5800 Portable is a com- 
pletely self contained high performance satellite 
receiver, t.v. set, signal 
meter, signal scanner, with 
recbaj^eable batteiy pack 
and charter aU in one 
small portable unit! It is 
Ught weight, fits under 
an airplane seat and is 
perfect for site surveys, 
R,V.'s, anterma alignment 
and system trouble shoot- 
ing. 

■ ^ ^. ^ ^ ^ ^.aa.^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ iH ^ ^ri 

How Do I Get One? 

Giiliispie satellite t.v. systems are «old bj franchiaed dealers 
throughout the U.S. and Cflnada. Most accept maior credit cords 
and many can help ycHj arrange long range finanqing. For the name 
of your nearest dealer and free descriptive brochures, jui^t phone or 
mail in this handy coupon. 

(408) 730-2500 ask for Lydia Gillaspie 

Yes! I would tike to receive more information. 

Name 





Address. 



Telephone- 



nConsumer 



DDealer 



(GlUaapie #7600 A System, iticLu ding receiver, low-noise amplifier and 6 foot diameter antenna sold as a unit. May be installed by customer or by dealer at slight additional cost 
•GUlaspie systems are warranteed by the manufacturer to be free from defects for 90 days. See dealer for details of warranty and optional dealer installation.) 
Note: Satellite TV reception may vary in certain locales. Check with your nearest Gillaspie dealer 



^lEs^i e ttn r\%i tDcc lUcr^DUATiriM rAI3n 



ence and ail subsequent readings are dis- 
played as ± deviations from that reading. 
Resistance ranges are autoranging up 
to 300 megohms. Continuity tests can be 
made using either an audible or visual (on 
the display) indicator, A conductance 
range that is useful for measuring very 
high resistances (up to 10,000 megohms) 
is provided. While the reading is dis- 
played in nanosiemens, a handy chart for 
converting that reading to ohms is pro- 
vided. The 2000- and 20,000-ohm resist- 
ance ranges can be used for testing semi- 
conductor junctions. Those provide a 
constant current that is high enough to 
turn on a junction. That function is clearly 
noted on the front panel as a reminder. 



The range and standard-function 
switches are all located down one side of 
the meter for easy one-handed operation. 
The ON -OFF switch is also located on the 
side, but away from the rest and toward 
the top of the meter. The special-function 
switches are located in a row at the top of 
the front panel . Test leads plug into pro- 
tected jacks at the bottom. 

The meter performs a self-test pro- 
cedure every time it is turned on. During 
that procedure, the entire display is acti- 
vated, including all four digits (ones are 
displayed) as well as the function and 
low-battery annunciators. 

The meter can be used for a wide vari- 
ety of tests; let's take a look at some of 







g 

z 
o 

DC 

O 

Ui 

_t 

LU 

6 

Q 
< 

28 



When you're testing circuitry, you need the best troubleshooter around: 
The A P fest Clip. 

It's made with a narrow nose shape that allows for easy attachment on 
high density boards. Nailhead pins that keep probe hooks from sliding off 
ends. Open nose design that permits probe tip access to DIP leads. And a 
contact comb that fits between DIP leads, eliminating any possibility of 
shorts. All these little design differences odd up to the ultro-reJiable, safe, 
quick DIP troubleshooting you need. 

tou can buy A P Test Clips in 56 standard or connector-compatible models 
in 14 sizes. And every one Is made with highest quality engineering and In- 
dustrial grade materials for long life and reliability 

A P PRODUCTS made the first IC Test Clips... and they are still the best. 

Call TOLL FREE, 80O-321 -9668, for the name of the distributor nearest you. 
(In Ohio, call collect; (216) 354-21 Ol.) 



A P PRODUCTS INCORPORATED 

9450 Rneneedle Drive 

PO, Box 603, Dept, A 

MenWr, Ohio 44060 

[216] 354-2101 

TWX: aiD-425-S25D 

In Europe, contact A P PRODUCTS GmbH 
Baeumleswfeg 21 • D-7031 V\feil 1 • W. Germany 



them. You can find the bandwidth of any 
audio amplifier (as defined by its 3-d B 
points) using just the DMM and an audio 
generator. The generator need not be cali- 
brated that accurately, as the meter can be 
used to determine the generator's output 
fairly precisely. The first thing to do is to 
connect the generator to the amplifier's 
input (you can .set the input level to what- 
ever you want by reading it out on the 
meter), connect the meter to the amplif- 
ef s output, and set the meter to read AC 
voltage. Next, determine a zero-dB level. 
To do that, set the generator to 1 KHz 
(that is the frequency most commonly 
used as a standard), and push db and the 
REL (relative reference] buttons on the 
meter. Now, all readings will be refer- 
enced to that level and read out directly in 
dB, To make the test, start the generator at 
zero dB and slowly increase the frequen- 
cy until the meter reads - 3dB . That is the 
upper limit of the bandpass. To get the 
precise frequency, hit the hz button on the 
meter and log the reading. To find the 
lower bandpass limit, repeat the pro- 
cedure, except this time work downward 
from zero dB. 

The results of that test can be used to 
find the Q of frequency-sensitive filters 
(such as bandpass, high- or low-pass filt- 
ers, notch filters, etc.) as well as any other 
type of tuned audio -frequency circuit. To 
find the Q of such circuits, determine the 
circuit's pass band from the procedure 
above and divide the center frequency of 
that passband by the passband's band- 
width. 

The relative reference function can be 
used for very rapid signal tracing. For a 
3-stage amplifier, for instance, connect 
the DMM across the first-stage input and 
feed the signal froni an audio generator 
into that input. Set whatever level you 
want as dB and use the dB and relative 
reference functions on the meter to store 
that as a reference. Now, move the meter 
to the output of that stage to see what the 
gain is. Do the same for the remaining 
stages. That one test should be invaluable 
for checking things like the 3-4 stage 
direct-coupled video and audio amplifi- 
ers, as well as many other types. Any 
defective stage can be found easily and 
quickly "using that technique. 

The meter can also be used to quickly 
find the frequency response of any ampli- 
fier, record player, tape deck, or the like. 
Let's see how that is done for a tape deck 
as an example. First of all, set the DMM 
to read AC voltage on the 200-mV range 
and connect it to the output of the deck. 
Now, play a frequency-test tape on the 
deck and set the relative reference func- 
tion for some convenient value, say 1000 
Hz, or whatever other value you wish. 
Now play the whole tape through and log 
the response to each frequency. The fre- 
quency "cuts" on the tape should play 
long enough for you to get a reading. The 
frequency response of the main amplifier 
can also be checked; just connect the 



CIRCLE S6 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



meter across the output and be sure that 
the output is terminated into its rated load. 
Then, set the meter to a suitable range and 
play the frequency -test tape. Tests for 
stereo balance, head alignment, and 
many more things can be perfomied using 
that setup. 

The instruction manual is very elabo- 
rate. Each function is described, and 
you're told how to set it up, as well as 
what it will do. It describes quite a few of 
the specialized tests that can be done us- 
ing the meter, and a complete explanation 
of exactly how the instrument works is 
provided. Also provided are a parts list, 
schematics, a troubleshooting guide, and 
layout illustrations showing the location 
of all calibration adjustments, test points, 
etc. Finally, there's a list of the many 
accessory probes available for use with 
the DMM. Those include an RF probe 
that's used to extend the frequency range 
to 100 MHz, an HV probe, temperature 
probes, a clamp-on AC-current transfor- 
mer, a current shunt, and a high- 
frequency probe for frequencies up to 50t.' 
MHz. 

We've covered only a few of the things 
that the instrument can do and we're sure 
that you'll find quite a few more as you 
use it. The model S060A is an extremely 
versatile piece of test equipment, and one 
that should be well worth its suggested list 
price of $349.00. R-E 

I Sony TC-K555 Stereo 
i Cassette Deck 

CIRCLE ItW ON FREE INFORM ATION CARD 




IF YOU ARE AN AUDIO ENTHUSEAST LOOK- 

ing for a modestly priced, state-of-the-art 
stereo cassette deck, one unit you should 
consider is the TC~K555 from the Sony 
Corporation (Sony Drive, Park Ridge, NJ 
07656). 

That deck, which is priced at $420.00. 
is packed with many features that a few 
years ago were seen only on much more 
expensive units. 

Sony used a three-head design rather 
than using a two-head, sandwich design 



(where each head can affect the other 
magnetically). That head arrangement al- 
lows you to monitor your recording by 
listening to the signal that's actually on 
the tape, rather than the signal that's go- 
ing to be on the tape. The record and 
playback heads are independently sus- 
pended and are separated by an air space 
of about 1 ,2 mm so that crosstalk is nil; 
there is a minimum of magnetic- flux leak- 
age. The heads are mounted on one block, 
and each can be separately adjusted for 
precise azimuth alignment. The heads are 
made of both Sendust and Ferrite so that 
they can take advantage of metal tapes 
(which provide a wider dynamic range 
than do conventional tapes). 



To reduce wow and flutter, the TC- 
K555 uses two sets of capstans and pinch 
rollers that en.-iure uniform tape tension 
and stable tape-to-head contact. For the 
same reason, the capstans are driven by 
linear-torque motors. Wow and flutter of 
0.04 percent wrms indicates the success 
of those measures to attain stability in the 
tape- transport system. 

The TC-K555 boasts some other im- 
pressive specifications. Total harmonic 
distortion is 0.8 percent when using high- 
performance tapes. (Although, as noted, 
the fC555 will handle normal tapes, 
chances are that most audio enthusiasts 
will use high-performance tapes to get the 
best performance from the deck.) 




FOCUS ON VIDEO WITH SAMS 



SAMS 
BOOKS 



Sams library of video books 
clearly shows you everything 
you need to produce and enjoy 
your own video. Be your own 
producer with these boolcs from 
Sams: 

HOME VIDEO HANDBOOK 
(3rd Edition) covers the big home 
video picture and shows you 
how to use everything from 
VCRs and videodiscs to large- 
screen projection systems. Easy- 
to-read into from video industry 
expert Charles Bensinger, 
No. 22052, $13.95 

VIDEO PRODUCnON GUIDE 
takes you through the entire 
production process from script 
to distribution. Covers all details 
of in -studio and remote 
productions for video 
professionals and serious 
amateurs. Also makes an 
excellent textbook. Edited by 
Charles Bensinger. No. 22053, 
$28.95 

VIDEO GUIDE (3rd Edition), 
also by Charles Bensinger, is a 
fully-illustrated, hardware- 
oriented introduction to the 
use and operation of video 
equipment A classic reference 
guide to professional and 
amateur use of cameras, editing 
systems, ienses, accessories and 

HOWA RDWSAMSaC0..1NC,4 300 Wml 



more. No. 22051, $18.95 

SATELUTE TV HANDBOOK 
shows you how to build your 
own earth station, see 
blacked -out and unedited 
network TV shows, legally and 
privately cut your cable costs in 
naif, and much more. Written by 
Anthony T Easton, No. 22055, 
$16.95 (tentative) 

BASICS OF AUDIO AND 
VISUALSYSTEMS DESIGN 
provides valuable NAVA- 
sanctioned information for 
designers and installers of 
commercial, audience-oriented 
AV systems, and especially 
newcomers to this field of AV. 
Gives you a full background in 
fundamental system design 
concepts and procedures, 
updated with current 
technology. 1^0. 22038, $15.95 

Get you r act together with 
these Sams Books, and act now! 
To order call 800-428-3696 or 
3 1 7-298-5566 and reference 
AD278. 

Offer good i n USA only and 
expires 8/31/83Pricessubject 
to change without notice. In 
Canada, contact Lenbrook 
Industries, Ltd., Scarborough, 
Ontario. 

62 nd street, RO. Box 7092, ( nttianipolts, ( N 462 06 



CIRCLE e4 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



> 

< 



29 



For normal tapes, the signal-to-noise 
ratios are 56 dB with Dolby off, 63 dB 
with Dolby-B, and 69 dB with DoJby-C. 
For chromium -oxide tapes, the S/N ratio 
is 57 dB with Dolby off, 64 dB with 
Dolby-B, and 70 dB with Dolby-C. 
Ferro-chromium tapes display markedly 
better performance characteristics and the 
system is able to make use of them, with a 
S/N ratio of 61 dB with Dolby off, 68 dB 
with Dolby-B, and 74 dB with Dolby-C. 
In fact, FeCr tapes outperform metal 
tapes (in terms of the signal-to-noise 
ratio), whose figures are 60 dB with Dol- 
by off, 67 dB with Dolby-B, and 73 dB 
with Dolby-C. 

The frequency response figures of the 
TC-K555 are also impressive. With Dol- 
by off. the figures are: 20 to 18,000 Hz 
with normal tapes and chromium oxide 
tapes, and 20 to 19,000 Hz for ferro- 
chromium and metal tapes. However, 
there are other things besides the speci- 
fications that make the Sony TC-K555 an 
impressive stereo cassette deck. They are 
the many "human engineered" features 
that arc included. 

Features 

The tape counter, usually taken for 
granted on cassette decks, is one feature 
that deserves close examination. That's 
because it's not simply a counter that 
counts arbitrary units (which seem to be 
different on every cassette deck) to indi- 



cate elapsed "time." Instead, it's a real- 
time counter. It provides you with a 
meaningful way to index your taped 
selections, and it can even tell you how 
much time is left on a cassette that you're 
recording. Let's take a closer look at how 
that feature is used. 

One thing that you can use the counter 
for is simply to determine how much time 
is available on one side of a cassette. First 
you insert the tape and when you are at the 
beginning of it you press the counter 
RESET button. That, as you might expect, 
sets the counter to zero. Next, fast- 
forward the tape to the end and the coun- 
ter will show you the approximate avail- 
able recording time. Using a slightly dif- 
ferent procedure you can also use the 
counter to determine the time remaining 
on one side of a cassette. 

Perhaps the most useful way to use the 
counter is to monitor the remaining rec- 
ording time while you are recording. As 
before, you insert the tape, and fast- 
forward it to the end. Then you reset the 
counter and rewind the tape. The display 
will show how much titne is available. As 
you record, the digits will decrease to 
zero. (Actually they increase to zero — the 
counter display shows a minus sign to 
indicate that it is in that mode.) 

We should point out that the counter is 
not a digital clock. The time that it dis- 
plays is approximate, and it will vary 
depending on the type of tape that you 



use. For best accuracy, you should use a 
C-60 tape. (That is what the counter is 
calibrated for.) Even so, the real-time 
tape counter is a definite improvement 
over the standard arbitrary counter. It's an 
improvement over many other real-time 
counters, too. It will show the tape time 
continuously and does not need to be ad- 
justed when you change modes or tapes. 

There is yet another feature that makes 
the TC'KSSS easy to use: auto play and 
memory play/stop. If you have a tape that 
has to be rewound before you can listen to 
it, you no longer have to sit by the deck so 
you can press play after it finally re- 
winds. All you need to do is press rewind 
and PLAY at the same time. When the tape 
is completely rewound, it will play auto- 
matically. You can also use that feature 
along with the memory mode to start the 
tape (after rewinding) from any point on 
the tape. 

The dual-meter VU display also de- 
serves some attention. The display uses 
two rows of LED's to indicate the record- 
ing level . The saturation level (the highest 
recording-level setting that will not result 
in distortion) is also indicated on the 
meter. That saturation level is different 
for different types of tapes, and the TC- 
K5S5 takes that into account. A row of red 
LED's indicates the range where satura- 
tion occurs depending on which tape but- 
ton is pressed. (There is a choice of four, 
for normal, CrOj, FeCr, and metal 




TViee , /ree, JVcc . . . 



Hurry, hurry, step right up! 
It's RCA's Carnival of Awards. 
And what a lineup of acts. 
First, the headliners: RCA 
receiving tubes, very popular 
with TV technicians for their 
top performance and depend- 
ability. 

Plus, a stupendous car- 
nival of valuable awards. 
Shown here are just a few of 
the 21 great gifts waiting for 
you. To earn them, just pur- 
chase RCA receiving tubes 
in required quantities from 
your participating RCA dis- 
tributor. Each purchase helps 
qualify you for the award of 
your choice. See your partici- 
pating RCA distributor for 
details. And come one, come 
all to RCA's Carnival of 
Awards! 



i.^^^^^^^T^.^^^TV^^TV^^^^ 



30 



tapes.) You set the recording level by 
making sure that the meters deflect only 
to the lower edge of that line. 

Setting the proper level is made easy 
because when the monitor switch is set 
to SOURCE, the VU meters show the peak 
input levels, and display them for four 
seconds. (A higher input will be im- 
mediately indicated and held for four 
seconds.) 

The TC-K555 includes Dolby B and 
Dolby C noise-reduction systems. (Dolby 
C, a recent development, is more effec- 
tive than Dolby B. It begins to take effect 
at lower frequencies, and it reduces noise 
by 20 dB at 5 kHz as compared to 10 dB at 
5 kHz for Dolby B). 

Previously, we mentioned the satura- 
tion level of a tape (the level above which 
a recording will be distorted). At high 
frequencies, a tape will saturate more 
easily than at low frequencies. However, 
to reduce that problem, the Dolby C sys- 
tem includes a high-frequency anti- 
saturation network. That network reduces 
the level of high-frequency signals when 
you record. When you play back the rec- 
ording, the system boosts them back to 
their original level . 

Among the other features on the TC- 
K555 is an MPX (multiplex) filter. That 
filter is used for recording FM stereo 
broadcasts from stations that are 
equipped with Dolby noise-reduction 
systems. The filter suppresses the 1 9-kHz 



pilot signal and 38-kHz subcarrier (if they 
have not been adequately suppressed by 
the tuner). If the tuner does suppress those 
signals adequately, then you can record 
with the filter switched off. 

The TC-K555 also has the usual tape- 
selection and bias controls found on just 
about all component-stereo recorders. 
The bias is set by pressing one of the four 
TAPE buttons (for normal , chromium di- 
oxide, ferro-chromium, and metal tapes). 
When you are using normal tapes, you 
can also use the bias control to regulate 
the bias current by ± 20%. When bias is 
increased, it suppresses extremely high 
frequencies. High frequencies are 
boosted when bias is decreased. 

The deck includes a timer switch, so it 
can be used with an external timer to 
record or play back at a predetermined 
time. A headphone jack is also included. 
The headphone output has its own volume 
control. That's a nice bit of "human 
engineering." 

Yet another interesting function is the 
RECORD MUTING buttou. Pressing that 
button either inserts a blank space during 
a recording or eliminates unwanted mate- 
rial from a finished tape. It's an aid to 
editing. The TC-K555 has a fast-forward 
and rewind time of 90 seconds for a C-60 
cassette. 

The owner's manual for this cassette 
deck is good, and is aimed at the nontech- 
nical user. It features ample pictorial 



guides to help the user get started and 
explains some of the theory behind the 
various controls and features. However, 
it is very basic and will require the user to 
experiment for himself if he is to gain the 
fullest advantage from the recorder. R-E 




THE MUST fMPORTANT PART OF ANY 

radio setup — whether receiving or 
transmhting — is the antenna system. Of 
course it helps to have a good receiver or 



with your purchase of ^^A *S(§cBimx%Q ^Ubesf 




CG7170 

RAy-O-VAC "Magnum" 
& Function Light 
Value: S27.45 



CG7178 

Waring 

Ice Cream Parlor 

Value: S44.39 



CQ7169 
Sliil Cordlf- 
ScfSWdriver 

Value: S39 99 





.^^ 



CG7167 

American Tounster 
5 Inch Attache Case 
Value: S56.O0 





CG7163 
Cobra Cordless 
Extension Phone 
Value: SiB9 95 




CG7164 

Wittnauer "Saturn" 
Man's Quartz Watch 
Value: S175.0O 



CG7162 
Canon Palm-s 
Printing Calculator 
Value: S64 95 




CG716S 

Skil Double Insulated 
7Vj " Power Sa* 
Value: S65.99 



CG71B0 

London Fog 
lit an '3 Ramcoai] 
Value S150 00 



■■ 12 Jl Receiving 



Tuljes 



RCA Distributor and Special Products Division, Deptford, NJ 08O96 



> 

-< 

CO 

CD 

u 
31 



transmitter, but without a good antenna, 
excellent equipment can be useless. 

One trouble with tuned antennas is that 
their performance is good only at the nar- 
row frequency range for which the an- 
tenna was designed. While that problem 
is not as critical with a shortwave receiver 
as it is with a transmitter, it is a problem 
nevertheless. 

The solution to that problem, used by 
radio amateurs for many years, is a tuned 
matching circuit that presents the correct 
load impedance to the radio. Granted, an 
antenna matching circuit will not make 
your antenna better — it will only allow 
the radio to see a correct load — but it will 
allow the receiver to make the best use it 



can of the off-resonance antenna. While 
transmitting tuners have been around for 
years, there have been few matching de- 
vices for shortwave receivers until the 
introduction of the MFJ model 959 re- 
ceiver antenna tuner and preamp. 

The MFJ~959 is made by MFJ Enter- 
prises, Inc., (P.O. Box 494, Mississippi 
State, MS 39762} and is 9'/4 X 6 X 1V& 
inches and weighs about one pound. All 
the circuitry is contained in a 5 X 3 inch 
circuit-board. The tuner is powered by 9- 
to 1 8-volts DC that is supplied, through a 
subminiature jack on the back of the tun- 
er, from a wall transformer that is in- 
cluded widi the unit. 

The unit is designed to allow the max- 




o 

z 
o 

(T 

H 
O 
m 



a 
< 

EC 



32 



SPECIAL 
COMBINATION OFFER 



DIALER KIT 
INCLUDES: 

I advanced mtcroprocesMir 
I 3 integrated circuits 
I programmable keytioard 
I solid-state power supply 
I lwo-»ided printed circuit 

board 
I alt other necessary parts 

tor completion 




Foreign price cutting has forced this leading manufacturer to liquidate 
stacl< o< phone dialer kits and fully-assembled teleptiones. Diaiers 
operate witti any standard phone, store up to 11 pftone numtiers, call 
anyone attfie toucti ofa button. Phones are first quality, sold by l eading 
retail stores and catalogs throughout the U.S. Together, 
it's an unbeatable buy. PLEASE NOTE — Phone dialer is 
an intermediate kit requiring soldering wire connections. 
A great one- evening project. All parts and complete, clear 
instructions included. No electronic knowledge necessary. 

QUALITY PHONES FCC APPROVED 



Cordless Phone 
PLUS Auto Dialer Kit 

Retail Value $225 

N0UI0NLV»68.B8 

+■ S4.85 Shipping a Handling 



One Piece Phone 
PLUS Auto Dialer Kit 

Retail Value SI 25 

NOW ONLY 628M 

+ $3.85 Shipping & Handlmg 



IftllSF ACTION. 



TO ORDER: Send check or money order to 
The Saystar Company at our address below. Credit card 
holders can speed delivery by using our toll free number. 
Ud. residents add 5% tax. 




taction 0" '"^, saliBtieti 



GALL TOLL FREE (800) 838^170 



® 1983 The aayslar ( 



Monday Ihru Friday 9 a.fn. - S p.m. Eastern Time 

all olhet times 

(800)257-7850 

Md. residents call 

363-4304 Depl. 04D 



Baysiar 



110 Painters Milt Rd. Owings Mills, MD. 21117 



imum possible signal transfer by present- 
ing the proper match to the receiver. The 
tuner/preamp is broadband — designed to 
operate front 1 .8 to 30 MHz. It has three 
built-in functions. Not only will it act as a 
straight impedance-matching network (a 
variation of a T-network) but it will also 
act as a signal attenuator and as a pre- 
amplifier. Those functions are controlled 
by a four- position, .single-pole switch on 
the front of the tuner (the other position is 
or-Vbypass). Let's now look at the func- 
tions in greater detail. 

When the switch is in the tuner posi- 
tion, the signal is received at the antenna- 
input connector (either an SO-239 or 
RCA-type connector) and is then passed 
directly to the matching network which 
contains 10 inductances ranging from 
0.47 ;j,H to 47 fiH. The inductors are 
selected by a single-pole, lO-position ro- 
tary switch. Capacitance is then adiied by 
using two 320-pF variable tuning capaci- 
tors. One is on the receiver side of the 
circuit, while the other is on the antenna 
side (those are labeled receiver and At^i- 
TENNA on the front panel). Those controls 
are adjusted for maximum deflection on 
the receiver's signal meter or for max- 
imum noise from the receiver if it has no 
S-meter. 

When the function switch is in the 
TUNER -ATTENUATOR .Setting, an attenua- 
tion pad is placed in series with the an- 
tenna. That introduces enough resistance 
into the circuit to produce 20 dB of signal 
attenuation. That is especially useful if 
the receiver is being overloaded by near- 
by broadcast stations, amateur transmit- 
ters or CB radios. Indeed, that feature 
works well. It will null out almost all but 
the strongest signals. 

In the TUNER-AMP mode, a common- 
collector amplifier circuit is switched in 
series wth the antenna, and weak signals 
are easier to copy. That helps, especially 
if the sensitivity and selectivity of the 
receiver itself falls short. The circuit, 
built around a 2N3904 transistor, can pro- 
vide as much as 1 2 to 24 dB of gain to the 
receiver. It is that increase in gain which 
also helps, seemingly, to improve the 
sensitivity and selectivity of the radio. It 
works well enough to pull in barely- 
readable weak signals out of the noi.se and 
make them readable. However, one 
drawback is that that feature will also 
iticrease the noise level of the receiver. 
So, it is a trade-off, but in many cases a 
good one. 

One interesting and convenient feature 
of this tuner is the inclusion of the two 
types of antenna connectors. TTiat makes 
it easy to use antennas with either RCA- 
type or SO-239 connectors. There is a 
bypass setting for those times when you 
are using the antenna for the frequency 
range for which it was cut. There is also a 
provision for tying a second receiver into 
the circuit. That is convenient for the avid 
confiimed on page tOO 



The trouble with most delayed- 
sweep scopes is the delay — not the 
electronic kind, but the delivery delay. 
B&K-PRECISION has solved that prob- 
lem, so now you can have the delayed- 
sweep scope you need, when you need it. 

The new model 1530 delayed-sweep 
scope from Bi&K-PRECISlON is not only 
available at local distributors now, but it 
has all of the most frequently needed fea- 
tures. Thirty MHz response, 2m V division 
sensitivity and rectangularCRT assure that 
the 1530 will handle the requirements of 
most engineers involved in digital and mi- 
croprocessor circuit development. High- 
triggering sensitivity and very-flat fre- 
quency response also allow the 1530 to be 
useful well beyond its rated bandwidth. 

Five ranges of time -base del ay from InS 
to lOOmS highlight this new instrument. 
The delayed-sweep capability of the 1530 
is a major advantage in the evaluation of 
digital pulse trains and other complex 



waveforms. Complex signals can be 
expanded by as much as 1000 times for 
examination of signal components and 
troublesome "glitches." The absolute 
minimum magnification is 5 times at fre- 
quencies to 30MHz. The delayed-sweep 
feature is also useful in the measurement 
of rise and fall times of pulse signals. 

ModftI f535 



For highest display accuracy, the 1530 
offers a variable hold-off function. This 
ensures triggering at the first pulse of a 
multi-pulse signal, preventing improper 
waveform display. The 1530 can also dis- 
play two signals that are unrelated in 
frequency by alternately triggering on 
both the channel A and B signals. 

Other convenient features include a FIX 
mode to eliminate trigger level adjust- 
ments, differential input capabiUty, single 
sweep operation, selectable tiiggering 
filters and a built-in video sync separator. 

If you're looking for the kind of 
features and performance found in the 
1530, but without delayed-sweep capa- 
bility. B&K-PRECISION offers the 
35MHz model 1535. The 1535 is a high- 
performance instrument that doesn't 
sacrifice performance. 

For immediate delivery, contact your 
local B&K-PRECISION distributor or call 
toll-free 1-800-621-4627. 

DYNASCAN 

CORPORATION 

6460 W. Cortland Street ■ Chicago, IL 60635 ■ 312/889-9087 

InternatroiMi Sales, m60 w. coniand street. Chieaoo. iL 60635 USA: teleji J5-347S 

Canadian Sales. Atlas Electronics, Ontario 




Delayed s^veep without delay. 




^^ — *,anmer rebate. 

Direct foctoty S,««*^onMode;_|g; 



$50.00 on 



Waei«»52S^SSS 



purchase a 
1983 and 



CIRCLE 66 OMFREt 



along' 



CO 

o 
z 
o 
tr 
t~ 
o 



o 



tf you have put off 
learning more 
electronics for ai^ 
of these reasons, 
act now! 



D I don't have the time. 

n High school was hard for me and 
electronics sounds like it may be 
hard to learn. 

D I can't afford any more education. 

n I have a family now. 

D I'm here. You're there. I've never 
learned that way before. I'm not 
sure it will work for me. 



s Read the opposite page and see how you can get started today! 



34 



Be honest with yourself. Are 
the reasons really excuses? You 
already know enough about 
electronics to be interested in 
reading this magazine. So why 
not learn more? If you need 
encouragement, read on and 
see how excuses can be turned 
into results. 

You don't have the time. Be realistic. 
All you have in life is a period of time. 
Use it. Try to know more tomorrow 
than you do today. That's the proven 
way to success, CIE studies require just 
about 12 hours of your time a week, two 
hours a day. You probably do have the 
time. 

Electronics sounds like it may be hard 
to learn. You already know something 
about electronics or you wouldn't be 
reading this. Now, build on that. CIE 
Auto-Programmed * Lessons help you 
learn. Topics are presented in simple, 
logical sequence. All text is clear and 
concise for quick, easy understanding. 
You learn step by step, at your own 
pace. No classes to attend. Nobody 
pressures you. You can learn. 
You can't afford any more education. 
Actually, you can't afford NOT to 
gain the skills that can put you ahead of 
the others. You know what inflation is 
doing to you now. Education— learning 
a skill — is an inflation- fighter that can 
be yours. If you are not able to pay full 
tuition now, CIE will lend you funds on 
a monthly payment plan. 
You have a family now. All the more 
reason why you have the responsibility 
to advance yourself. For the sake of 
your family. Do you want them to have 
what you had or have more than you 
had? The choice is yours. Electronics is 
a rewarding career choice. CIE can help 
you to get started on that career. 
You're there. We're here. How does 
CIE help you learn? First, we want you 
to succeed. You may study at home, but 
you are not alone. When you have a 
question about a lesson, a postage 
stamp gets you your answer fast. You 
may find this even better than having a 
classroom teacher. CIE understands 
people need to learn at their own pace. 
When CIE receives your completed 
lesson before noon any day of the week, 
it will be graded and mailed back the 
same day with appropriate instructional 
help. Your satisfaction with your 
progress comes by return mail. That's 
how CIE helps you learn. 



NOW, IF YOU AGREE CIE 
TRAINING CAN WORK 
FOR YOU, HOW ELSE 
CAN CIE HELP YOU? 

Cleveland Institute of Electronics is the 
largest independent home study school 
in the world that specializes exclusively 
in electronics. Although "big" does not 
always mean "best" it is evidence that 
CIE is a strong, successful institution 
with the people and resources to help 
you succeed. 




Step'by-step learning includes 
"hands-on'' training. 

The kind of professional you want to be 
needs more than theory. That's why 
some of our courses include the 
Personal Training Laboratory, which 
helps you put lesson theory into actual 
practice. Other courses train you to use 
tools of the trade such as a 5 MHz 
triggered-sweep, solid-state oscilloscope 
you build yourself — and use to practice 
troubleshooting. Or a Digital Learning 
Laboratory to let you appiy the digital 
theory that's essential today for anyone 
who wants to keep pace with electronics 
in the eighties. 




Your FCC License can impress 

employers. 

For some electronics jobs, you must 
have your FCC License. For others, 
employers usually consider it a mark in 
your favor. Either way, your License is 
government-certified proof of your 
knowledge and skills. More than half 
of CIE's courses prepare you to pass 
this exam. Surveys show that some 
80% of CIE graduates who take the 
exam are successful. 



Find out morel 
Today. Now. 

There's a card with this ad. Fill it in 
and return. If some other ambitious 
person has already removed it, use the 
coupon. 

You'll get a copy of CIE's free 
school catalog, along with a complete 
package of personal home study 
information. 

For your convenience, we 'U try to 
arrange for a CIE representative to 
contact you to answer any questions 
you may have. 

If you are serious about a rewarding 
career, about learning electronics or 
building on your present skills, your 
best bet is to go with the electronics 
specialists — CIE. Mail the card or 
coupon today or write CIE (please 
mention the name and date of this 
magazine), 1776 East 17th Street, 
Cleveland, Ohio 44114. 

This could be the best decision 
you've made all year. 

Associate Degree 

Now, CIE offers an Associate in 
Applied Science Degree in Electronics 
Engineering Technology. In fact, all 
or most of every CIE Career Course 
is directly creditable towards the 
Associate Degree. 

"If you're going to learn 
electronics, you might as well 
learn it right:' 

John Cunningham ( ^'-J 

Senior Technical Director 



CIE 



Cleveland Institute 
of Eleetronies, Inc. 




177S Eaet 17th ScreeE, Cleveland. Ohio 4411-4 
Accrecfiiod Wtmber National Home Siudy Council 



n YES.. .1 want to iearn from the specialists in electronics — CIE. Send me my FREE 
CIE school catalog... including details about the Associate Degree program... plus my 
FREE package of home study information. 

Print Name . 



Address. 



-Apt.. 



City_ 
State. 
Age _ 



_Zip_ 



.Phone (area code). 



Check box for G.I. Bill bulletin on Educational Benefits: D Veteran 

MAIL TODAYI 



— , . s 

□ Active Duty "^ 

ID 

RE-60 K 



37 



NEW PRODUCTS 



For more details use the free 
information card inside the baGl< cover 



BOARD, model 4S/2P-ASM, is a four-serial/ 
two parallel port board. The four RS-232 se- 
rial input/output ports use four 8251 s. Tfie 
I/O ports use eigfit consecutive 8080 ports. 




CIRCLE 141 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Features Include fuH tiandshaking capability 
and four dip-switcfi-controlled baud-rate 
generators. 
Two 8-bit parallel I/O ports include four 



8-bit latches {74LS373's) and use four con- 
secutive 8080 ports. There are separate 
handshaking lines, outputs that will drive up 
to 30 mA, and inputs that present less than a 
.4-mA load. 

The board is S-100 compatible; all cables 
are included; it comes completeiy assembled 
and thoroughly tested, and there is a six- 
month, no-fault full warranty. 

The model 4S/2P-ASM is priced at 
$395.00.— Tar bell Electronics, 950 Dovlen 
Place, Suite B, Carson, CA 90746. 

RADAR DETECTOR, the Radar Intercept, 
model IN, has a slim, solid-state design that 
allows it to be mounted easily into the auto- 
mobile's visor. It is activated by lowering it 
into position; no complicated installation 
methods are needed. Using a swivel bracket, 
there will be no interference with the driver's 
vision. 
The Radar Intercept detects police- radar 




CIRCLE 142 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



units on X and K bands, and its circuitry 
searches and selects signals on both bands. 
There is a two-stage warning system. When 
weak signals from distant radar units are en- 
coufmued on page 44 



TRITON MARKETINQ Cprp. 
e79 RIMSIN AVIHUI 
BROOKLYN, N.Y. llSSft 



TOI 



Ws Accapt Mastercard and Vl«a 



1-800-SS1-9B38 
1-9 12-348-8000 



z 
o 

I- 

o 

m 



o 
o 
< 

(r 

38 



MICROWAVE TV 




DCV - 200 

• H«il lor uidbn 
8tflllBl Ar««i 

9 1.fi-7.T OHi 

• BuM In fkiA 0vR«h 

• AH Cafata A Hardwnr* 

:=r $129,05^ 



MDC - 23D 

% t Hlcr£>*fav« at«e«a 
% BulH lit A/flft«[taK 

^$149,96^ 





MDC 



23P 



• 3.T0 KfL It. PirfttDh 
% 2 hU«rawavit Abaaa 

• 3.1-1.4 QHi 

• B(dl^ A/t Bwlfeh 

• AlCftbl* t Hinlwt/* 

i=i$199.95 



WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF 
CABLE TV CONVERTERS & DECODERS 



SATELLITE TELEVISION SYSTEMS 




TRITON: 



A NEW APPROACH 

TO 
SATELLITE TV 



DON'T BUY LESa SYSTEM THAN YOU WANT. OR MORC , 
THAN VOU NtEO. OW PHOHI CA1.I. WILL INSURE THAT 
YOUR SATILLITt DOLLARS ARE WELL •PfHT. 

ALL Til/TOW SYSTEMS ARE EXPANDABLE. START WITH 
THE 'ADVEHTUER' AND YOU CAH ADD COMPONENTS AS 
YOUR NEEDS CHANQC. 



HO SYSTEM IS COMPLETE UNTIL YOU DECUE IT N. 

ADVENTURER; 10' tiberglass with pole polar mnunt, Avantek 12cPk LNA, Glllaspie 



7600A receiver, electronic scaler feed, 100' wine and InstructloiiB. 

STARGAZER: The "ADVENTUREK" plus East/West motor drive, 

STATESMAN: The "ADVENTURER" plua a programable motor drive. 

PERFORMER: The "STATESMAN" with a stereo processor for all stereo fonnats. 

EXECUTIVE: The ultimate system with wireless remote control. Featuring a 10' 
fiberglass reflector, pole polar mount, IR remote, auto polarization 
of Avantek 100 TC LNA, all stereo formats, prbgramatle motor drive. 

URBANA: A true roof mxtuntable system weighing only ISO pounds. With an 

Avantek 120 K LNA, Glllaspie 7600A receiver, scaler feed and 
rotator. East /West motor drive, 100' wire and instructions. 



« tiTs.oe 

2S1S.00 
SSIf.OO 

*iTa.a« 



CIRCLE S7 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



/IC-20 



COMPUTER AND SOFTWARE 



I real computer at the price of a toy) | 



134. 



00 



(vhen you buy 6 programs) 

ou gel ths Commodore VIC-20 computer (or only 
134,00 when you buy 6 tape programs on sale (or 
nly S59.0O. These S programs list (or SIOO.OO to 
132.00. You can choose one of three packs: B 
ames pack, 6 home finance pack, or 6 small 
usiness pack. The VIC-2a computer includes a full 
Ize 66 key typewriter professional keyboard, color 
ommand keys, upper/lowar case, full screen editor, 
6K level II microsoft basic, color, sound and 
tusic, real time, (loafing point decimal, easy to 
»ad self teaching Instruction book, connects to any 
V, Includes console case. 

33K COMMODORE VIG t1W.O0 
twith 3K tinws mon power 

'ou get the VIC-20 computer plus we expand the 
otal memory to 33,000 bytes to give you 2'A times 
nore programming power. 

41K COMMODORE WC tSMM 
I ttritti 4 llDMs mora po«mr 



40K COMMODORE VIC $2W.OO 
t«ith e UiDM mon powtr 



WK COMMODORE VIC 
PROFESSIONAL WORDPROCESSOR I2M. 

'ou get the powerful VIC-ZO computer with eitpan- 
fed memory - plus we add The Quick Brown Fox 
irofesslonai wordprocessor This combination 
lives you a 49K professional wordprocessor. (80 
column formatting and mailmerge $100 extra). 



TRACTION FRICTION PRINTER S299,00 

Jomstar FfT deluxe line printer, prints B%xt1 full 
ifze, single sheet, roll or fan fold paper, labels etc. 
10, 66. 80, 132 columns Impact dot matrix, bi- direc- 
ional, 80 CPS. 



MK MEMORY EXPANDER $79.00 

SIxslot — Switch selectable — Reset, button — Rib- 
bon cable. A must to get the most out ot your 
1/ IC-20 computer. 



VOICE SYNTHESIZER in.OO 

^akes your VIC-20 talk, VOTRAX based plus 
Mtures found only In $295 versions. 



SALE 



IC 



OMMODORE 



64 



(mor« power than Apple II at half the price) 



300. 



00 



FREE 

PROFESSIONAL 

SOFTWARE 



VIC20 ^?°u"t^^« 



TOP 10 ARCADE GAMES 

VIC2DTAPE PHOanAM SALEIt 
Ainh Nim« $«|« 

1. SllpVr Ptntrooptr ^FintUl^cl llt.K 

2. Exttrmtnjiiar-F'lijt I19.W 
|BeM«f IMn C*n|ip*dlt 

3- Cricti«l [Ge1l«f Ihun Froggir) 119.H 

4 SJiifhTijn [&*u«r thin Piciimanl tIS.'SQ 

5. Giiiclic CfOi»lir« lyou m tn* middJi) llS.fiS 

A Ann Mfiter Splillii (NucrHr Diuil«r) S19.H 

7 Bu{i ami (C^«*py) (I4ft5 

t BoJnbs Awir iGrMi) %MM 

9 3-OMJjt EtCtpt t14,M 

iO KrUf KoftQ |14.ft& 
BUY ANY FOUR - DEDUCT 10% MORE 

VIC-20 PROGRAMMING AIDSM 

4 InlrOducnOn lo bHiC pfOgrimming %i2.9i 

(minull *T\e tAptD 

* Aavtrtccfl basic proOrtmminQ' 32.H 
[mmull ind tAptah 

* Progir2iriim«fS ircitr«nc« mtnual 1S.Q9 
[20S pages — rou muit hivt Ihn') 

* PrograiTifncrs tlly ftttrAiTVC* CVd 3.99 

* VIC 20 Revtjitd 11.9a 
(24? c»a>gt3 ol VIC i«crtitl 

* (»2 Micriine Llingu*ot Aiitmbllf 34.M 

* tfiK Progrin^jTiirLg Ciri^g« 79.00 
[gives 4CX)% mort progrifnm»ng pD*ir — 

gtt tH 95 i6K Jdvaniur* gifna (tt*]\ 



Commodore 64 Computer 



PROFESSIONAL SOFTWARE 



(when you buy the Commodore-64 Computer for $595.00 ) 



You get the extra powerful Gommodore-64 computer 
(64,000 bytes RAM plus 20,000 bytes ROM). Full size 
66 key typewriter keyboard, 320 x 200 high resolu- 
tion graphics, text is 40 columns by 25 lines. 1000 
displayable characters, 8 moveable sprites, pro- 
grammable synthesizer (4 wave forms, full ASDfl|. In 
addition to these features we give you FREE PRO- 
FESSIONAL SOFTWARE VALUED OVER S300,00. 



Nain* 


Sat* 


word processing pack 


$69.00 


complete Data Bas« pack 




linciudes Mjilme'gei 


169.00 


Ei«cuan.c spreadsheet pack 




(like xsicalc) 


tea.oo 


Accouriiir^g pack 




^personal & tiusiness} 


HSOD 


(*rc)gramnr>efS Helper 


I^OO 


proQrarr^ming Reference guhd« 


t1B95 


Basic Tutoi 


119.95 


TyCir^O Tulor 


119% 



80 column BOARD 

ISO characters per line or. itie screen al one time. In. 
Icludes word processing pack [list £89.00), complete I 
I data base pack (lisl Sd9.00}. Electronic spreadsfieet | 
|pack(lisl«9 00|. *LLFO*lONLVtl7S. 



We ha»e over 300 Projrams (or 
Itie Commodore 64 Computer 

we LOVE OUR CUSTOMERS 



PROFESSIONAL WORDPROCEMINa 
PACKAQE 

This wordprocessor is specially designed tor the 
Commodore-64 utilising the latest techniques. 
Allows powerful text editing capabilities without 
long hours ot orientation or training. Complete cur- 
sor and insert^delete key controls are used. Block 
movement and/or duplication, line Insertion and/or 
deletion, automatic centering, margin settings, tab 
settings, copy, disk or tape handling, and all printer 
types. Up 10 99 continuous pages o( text can be 
output to the printer. List $89.00. 



COMPLETE DATABASE PACKAQE 

A user (riendly data base system that makes In- 
formation easy to find and store. You can add, 
change, delete, and search (or data. Print the in- 
formation on a printer in any format desired. When 
combined witfi the word processor pack you have a 
powerful merge program that allows custom 
documents and personalized mailing lists. List 
S89.00. 

COMPLETE ACCOUNTINQ PACKAQE 
(Horn* Of Small ButlnMt) 

This general ledger program is perfect for small 
business as well as home. It utilizes a double entry 
bookkeeping system. You only need enter one tran- 
saction and the computer will handle the other. All 
accounts are user defineable and will build for 1 
year, resulting in a (lie o( all trahsactions by ac- 
count number, month and year to date. Each month 
a current month's transactions can be viewed at any 
time (99 accounts 187 entries per month). With this 
accounting program you will be able to monitor 
youf financial growth as well as your expenses. List 
S59.00. 

COMMODORE-C4 PROGRAMMERS 
REFERENCE GUIDE 

This is the in-depth guide that goes into the heart 
of the 64. All aspects ol the basic and machine 
language are covered. (A must (or anyone wishing 
to program the Commodore-64). List S20.95. 



• LOWEST PRICES • 15 DAY FREE TRIAL • 90 DAY FREE REPLACEMENT WARRANTY 
• BEST SERVICE IN U.S.A. • ONE DAY EXPRESS MAIL • OVER 500 PROGRAMS • FREE CATALOGS 



Add $10.00 for shipping, handling and insurance. Illinois residents 
please add 6% tax. Add S20.00 for CANADA, PUERTO RICO, HAWAII 
orders, WE 00 NOT EXPORT TO OTHER COUNTRI ES. 
Enclose Cashiers Check, Money Order or Personal Check, Allow 14 days 
(or delivery, 2 to 7 days for phone orders, 1 day express malll Canada 
orders must be in U.S. dollars. 



El^llERPRIZES (^^ LOVE OUR customers) 

BOX 550, BARRINGTON, ILLINOIS 60010 
Phone 312/382-5244 to order 



CIRCLE 58 ON FREE INFORtMATION CARD 



PHILIPS 



S^ 



TRIPLETT 



LEADER 




Non-UiMar Syi 



\Qj^^^^^ 



15 MHz TRIGGERED 
SWEEP SCOPE 



MODEL 

1477 




■ Mode automatically shifts between 
CHOP and ALTERNATE 

■ Bright P31 t}lue phosphor 

■ Front-panel X-Y operation 

■ Differential input capability 

■ 19 calibrated sweeps— .SmSEC/citi 
to ,5SEC/cm 

■ Sweep to .1 /J S EC/cm with 5x; 
1.5SEC/cm with uncaiibrated vernier 



10 MHz SCOPES 




CALL FOR 
I OUR PRICES I 

Triggered and automatic sweep 

18 calibrated sweeps 

On 1476 mode automatically shifts 
between CHOP and ALTERNATE 

Bright P31 blue pttosphor 

Front panel X-Y operation using 
matched vertical amps 

Video sync separators 

Check most digital logic circuitry 

PfilCe DOES NOT INCLUDE PROBES 



■ffpfiECISION 



70 MHz. Dual Time 
BASE SCOPE 



MODEL 
1570 




1 mV/divlsion sensitivity to 70 MHz 

500 ^V/dlvlsion cascade sensitivity 

Four-input operation provides trig- 
ger view on 4 separate Inputs. 

Alternate time base operation 

Switching power supply delivers 
ttest efficiency and regulation at 
lowest weight 



^J^^^^^ 



100MHz Dual Time 
BASE SCOPE 




White quantities last 



\ 




MODEL \, 
1590 



■ ImV/'division sensitivity to 100MHz 

■ 500^ V/division cascade sensitivity 

■ 2ns/diviston sweep rate with 10 x magnifier 

■ Four-input operation provides trigger views or 
four separate inputs 

■ Seiectaljle IMH or 50O inputs 

■ Alternate timebasa operation 

■ 20MHz bandwidth limiter for best view of low 
frequency signals 

■ Lighted function pushbuttons employing 
electronic switching with non-volatile RAM 
memory 

■ Switching power supply delivers best efficiency 
and regulation at lowest weight 

■ Selectable frequencies for chop operation 
PRICE DOES NOT 

INCLUDE PROBES 



KEIl 



DIGITAL MULTIMETERS 




Model 128: Beeper DMM 
designed to meet the tough specifi- 
cations of a major computer 
manufacturer. See /hear display 
includes over/under arrow and 
on /off beeper. 

Model 131: 0.25% accuracy 
added to the easiest to use handheld 
DMM. Color-coded front panels for 
maximum clarity, minimum 
confusion. 

Model 128: n39.CW 
Model 130: '124.00 



Model 130: Keithley user 
research led to unique DMM 
designs. Easy to read LCDs, largest 
DMM displays on the market. 

Model 135: Rrst 4y2-digjt 

handheld DMM, ideal for 
analytical /bio-medical service. lOA 
range standard on all Keithley 
handhelds. 



Model 131: '139.00 
Model 135: ^235.00 





o^SS^Jg 



We don't just take 

orders, we ship them 

Advance Electronics 

endeavors to keep everytjiing 

we advertise in stock for 

immediate delivery. 



MM 



I Mastoreharga & Vita thlppw) within 3* iKHirt. 

I Bank chscfct or Mon«y Ordtra (Mppad wittiln 24 houw. 

I P«r»onAl clWGfca — plea»« ■Mow 3 wvehs for ch*ck to ciMr. 

I AH prIcH plui shipping charge*. Plsaaa call far appropriata 

chargaa, Um our toll ff«« numbtf. 
I N«w York St*t« raaklant* add appdopitats salM tax. 
I PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WrfHOUT NOTICE. 

QuintHlaa ara llmltad 



1 



'*f^pmvfsn}\ 



{g^HITACHI , I 



CSATA PRECISION 



VIZ 



HICKOK 



I Dorac I 



'^PRiCISIQN 



COLOR BAR GENERATORS 




MODEL 1250 



Professional studio quality generator. Ultra stable 
ideal for VTR wori<. 

■ Generates NTSC color bars with or 
without — IWQ signal 

■ Generates 5 step linear staircase; 
staircase with high or low chroma 

■ External video input — modulates rf 
or i-f carrier outputs 



^r^^l 



MODEL 
1210 

B G9nerHtfl« 10 Atabis pinemB Fn- 
cltidtng crOABhatchn 7x1i dot, 
9at«d rAknbow and puHty. 

■ Compad lor convenlwil field »ef- 
vic« bJU 



CALL FOR OUR PRICES 




INDUSTRIAL 

JRANStSTOR 

TESTER 

was $239 

MODEL 
S20B 

Now with HI/LO Drive 

Works in-circult when 
others won't 

Identities all three tran- 
sistor leads 

Random lead connection 

Audibly and visually in- 
dicates GOOD transistor 



4<PRt CIS/OX 



POWER SUPPLIES 





$279~ 

was '354. 



MODEL 
1601 



waa ^75 



MODEL 
1650 



I laotaltti 0-5QVDC, conUnuMisly 
vwUbto: &-2A In four nMtSH 

I Fully Mrtwnitk: »Mtkwn, >d]uit' 
fbl* cumnt llmK 



■ Exduslv* tnckkig circuit 

■ F3»d output SVDC. 5A 

■ Two 10 a^VOC OUtpula It D.5A 

■ Fully HitomaltCH curanl-lfrnllvd 



[FLUKEI 



MODEL 8060A 




$349 



lOO 



4% DIGIT 
MULTIMETERS 

Frequency 
measurements to 
200KHZ 

dB measure- 
ments 

Basic dc accura- 
cy 0.04%; 10 ^V, 
10 nA and 10 mft 
sensitivity. 

Relative measure- 
ments 



■ True RMS 

■ High-speed 

Beeper 



■ Continuity and rela- 
tive reference tunc- 
tions identical to 
8060A. 

True RMS measure- 
ments to 30 kHz. 

Basic dc 
accuracy 
0.05%; 10 
^V, 10 nA 
and 10 m£i 
sensitivity. 



00 



MODEL 8062AI 



$279 




4<PRiCISH)\ 




MODEL 3010 



I VHlnMt Wd HJUd TTl. output* 
I 4.1 Hx to IWHi In m\x nngst 
I PmH tHitton rans* md hinctlon 



I Typical tlrw wiv* iflitortkin iHid*r 
OJi^frofn 1 HitoiaOkHi 



FUNCTION GENERATORS 

MODEL ei7Q95 
3010 ^1 f 9 

was $220. 

"S' $299''^ 

was $379. 

SWEEP FUNCTION 
MODEL 3020 

■ Four |iwlriuin*nt> In on» pa c k iBi 
iwo*p OKitriflor, functhHi g«witO>f , 
pulH g«n«r«tw. toi^t-bumt QHHntof 

■ Dowa a.02Hz-2MHz 

■ 1000:1 tuning rang* 

ai LOW-dtlt'Oftkrti hlgh-acouracy ou^iuta 



SfCPRECISION 



CAPACITANCE METERS 




i$179''^ $149^^ 

was $229. was $185. 




MODEL 830 

■ Automatically rnea- 
sures capacitance 
from O.lpFto 2D0mF 

■ 0.1 pF resolution 

■ 0.2% basic 
accuracy 

■ ZVi digit LCD display 



MODEL 820 

■ Resolves to 0.1 pF 

■ 4 digit easy-to-read 
LED display 

■ Fuse protected 
against charged 
capacitors 

■ Overran ge indication 



VIIZ 






WE STOCK FULL LINE] 

OF VIZ ANALOG and 
DIGITAL POWER 
SUPPLIES 




600 



.223 



^qtUW% . THE TEST EQUIPMENT SPECIALISTS 



.ou-^B-^l^-JOA^ 



26 WEST 46th STREET, NEW YORK, NY. 10036 212-730-7030 







FLUKI 



DIGITAL 
« MULTIMETER 




$389' 



8050A-01 
RECHARGEABLE 

S439« 



MODEL 
8050A 



■ 4y2 Digits 

■ 50 KHz frequency response 

■ 10 /xV resolution 

■ .03% accuracy 

■ True RMS ■ dB 

■ measurements and memory 
relative 



Jwwfw w 



DIGITAL 
MULTIMETER 




MODEL 467— ^^,J 

«239'' 

Reg. '279" 

■ True RMS 

■ Analog display 

■ Peak hold 



PORTABLE 
TRANSISTOR TESTER 




CALL FOR OUR 



PRICES 

■ Fast GO/NO-GO in- 
elrcuit transistor testing 

■ Fast and thorough 
GOOD/BAD out-of- 
circuit testing 



ITACHI 

OSCILLOSCOPES 




MODELJ69 $4 0000 



SVi DIGIT 



MODEL 176 SOCDOO 

4Vi DIGIT £Da 



"='-'-"^^' HANDHELD DIGITAL MULTIMETER 



MODEL 

3022B MODEL 
8020B 



MODEL 

8024B 




8022B THE TROUBLESHOOTER ■ 6 

functions ■ 0.25% basic dc accuracy ■ 
Overload protection 

8020B THE ANALYST ■ 7 functions ■ 

0.1% basic dc accuracy ■ LCD display ■ 
Safety design test leads. 

8024B THE INVESTtCATOR ■ 9 func- 
tions ■ 0.1% basic dc accuracy ■ Peak 
hold on voltage and current functions ■ 
Selectable audible indicator for continuity 
or level detection. 



Pi 



V134 
V202 
V203 
V209 
V352 
V353 
V509 

V650 
VI 050 



10MHz 
20 MHz 
20 MHz 
20 MHz 
35 MHz 
35 MHz 
50 MHz 

60 MHz 
100 MHz 



Dual Trace 
Dual Trace 
Dual Trace 
Dual Trace 
Dual Trace 
Dual Trace 
Dual Trace 

Dual Trace 
Quad Trace 



Storage 

w/deiay sweep 
Portable 
w/delay line 
w/delay sweep 
Portable 
w/defay sweep 
w/delay sweep 
w/delay sweep 



All in Stock Ready for immediate shipment. 

CALL FOR OUR PRICES 



All Hitachi Oscilloscopes feature 2 year parts and 
labor warranty. 



We don't just take 

orders, we ship them 

Advance Electronics 

endeavors to keep everything 

we advertise in stock for 

immediate delivery. 




■ Maatwctwrg* t Vlu shipped wHhIn 24 hour*. 

■ Bank ctHcki or Money Ordw* thippwt wtthln M Ivoura. 

■ Phhm] cttada — piena Mow 3 wMks for ciMCk to dMr. 

■ Ml piiCM plut alilpplnii ctvirgM. PIwm oil for appropHiM 
clvarg#a. Uaa our toll frva numbtr. 

■ Hm Yofk Stata raaktsnti add approprlata talM tax. 
a PfllCES SUBJECT TO CHANGE wmHOUT NOTICE. 

Quantltl** <r* llmltad 




4 • 1 



fliM Tim* 

Max. Input VciltaiQ* 
InpuT Coupling 
Input Imptdanco 
Opw#tmg M4k1« 
X-Y OpurBtiftn 
S«niitiviiry : _ i __ 

* Horizontal CfiflKifan 

TnM*r Me 
Trigg«rSoui 
TriyjTCw uj ^ H- 
TV Sync 
. Inturnjil. 
Exuritkl 



5mV/div t(i &V/cljv ta%. lOcnlibrat^d it( 
JxflWdiv to IV/div 4.6% : 

Uncalibrated continuous donirol be^™^__ 
sieps 1 <; 2 . 5 Tprovlde wijih' clTcC- pqtJ f fOTTrvB 

function) : i : 

fX: to 3OMHTr^3d0rfBt'4rdryJ'"' 

DC lo 7MH;. -3dB fet 4 (}iv| j 

(When usina xSimpiifierJL 

12n5, jfor xfjj 70ni :vP i 

Permits viewm^j leading ed ga o^dti 

waveform' [*"'"' - 

60DVp-p br 3O0V [qC+ ACpflpk.fl ' 

AC,GMD;DC ■ - "1 i— 

Direcr IM.olnm; app^ox- 30pF 

CH \ , CH2,.O0AL, ADO, PiEE, 

■ CHV; X aiis, ct<2' V axia] [ 

SmV/ctlv to SVj fdiv tWhenj usJrii j mS A npji ie f: 

ImV/divi ' I 



; AUTO Low Bandwidth 

Tjig^if Slapi 

E}(t>rntt Trigger Input 



:hi Cl- 

i Q4 '— ■ 



ch; , LtNE. e:j:t 



|cH 

[TV ^nc-s iparajion qircutt 



^F.ri&qjji 



2QHi 



53^ 



to-3 1M 



jv^itvhertusinjjLH 

1 ' L 

,e;j:t 



[ 1 Vp-ft or lor e'^V sync-signal) ■ 



.l.Jntfij-n^l 



ti _5MHt_l_0 



Sdly 




I 



External. 



gOOmV 



Xettin—.fiOOmV 



lt: 

ilM^hm. 



"SviTHp Tim* hni^Tuftir : 
M«x. Swasp Timi 



I * Powar Ritqui wnvtiu 



■ Oimgn^ora 



*yvt4ghi 



-(- 



30pP 0^ 1^ i f i 
Max .'linput voFtiioef TODVI 
'1DC+ ACpeakiat IK'H?) j 

:19 calibrated siiBps | ; t 
.;Unc4lii>ralad-c0nUnuQus.4Qrixcoi Ml 
ftep^ 1 . <^2.5 [prttvijiJed vvah dtck-r^ti^nina 

■function) " ' ! ' ' 

" iOtim« [j-T^tip" - 



T 



lU LlliUJi ^7 H qri I [ T 

10arts/divt(20n«/dlv Utd Spns/^n. 



fy t 



100/1 20/ J20/24DV 110% 
-.S& TO TOM! : 'spprox : «3w r 



Appri>K. ^5WI X 1 90) HI X 4diDID) 



';AppnoK-a5itg 



We don't just take ordfjrsl yiejihi| > pi^!l.:~ 




1 mV/div high sensitivity ide^igr 
■measurement of weak signals 



Employs TV sync 



-t-quch synchF0n-i?atJGRt-of 
.vertical sighaJjj. 



o\ fast Hisir^g yi/avies. 
*'^T|operatTQn'''c'6nvenietTFt"fo 



separatpr ■ cfrduTtry ; wtih-Tjn b~ 



Built-in sig nai dela y Ijij i e e n c to l es fi prv; t ^p 



30: 



'*h4T-\f--hpFt2-onpaUanp— - 



fneasuiferien 
ptjias^Ttlf fere nee betweenTWcrslfina Is; 
■Delated sweep function-jwith-jofi r-totJCh-coT^trf 
-1 OX magnification ' ' '' '' 



Trace rotation system por- ea^il\| at jujtinn trac» 



clination caused by terrestjrial m^gfletibm 

Fine adjusting click positioning f iificliior 
measuring efficiency 



• Signal outputp-^Hfpqtpm ternpiri iHo-+reqij^n"c f 

t-Gounter, etc. ' ■ ' ; ' --[ — 

Z axis .input pr.Qvided..-:aiossibJi4_tc 



I 



One Itoach shifting 



observation of ri^e a TBifall of waves, 



of wavSfo 



■m 



Effective I tc 




erihaices 



ai-CH 



slopes for pas f 



Price does not include probes....!... .:. 
Probes $50. a pair when purchased with 
scope. $10. shipping within continental U.S. 



JL 



dii 



Advance Electronics endeavors to keep everything 
we advertise in stock for immediate delivery. ■ .^ 



:iJ^ 



VISA 



ii® 



■ lUMfrchwg* t Vtu thlpptd wHMn 24 hour*. [- 

J^Bank dwdu or Hnwy Ontora ihlpiMd ortthin 24 hour*. ■ 

■ PwwHWl chKtw — ptMM aU«w 3 WMkt tM- chwA to Bl*W. 

-■"AH priCM plui ihlpplns chirgn. PtMU* eiM for inprniirlMI 
Uu our toll tn« mimbtr. 



■ New Vork Slate naMtnta tM apprnpriMa siIm lax. 
^ffWCES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WfTHOlH NOTKse. 



FT 



— < i^O * ^ r 



lae WEST 46th ajREET,; NEW Y^Rk. n/.Y. io036 2b-reO-703( 



JrlETEai 



rrTrnnrrrr 



TS 



NEW PRODUCTS 



continued from page 38 



countered, a non-rhythmic interrupted beep- 
ing is sounded. Wlien radar signals of suf- 
ficient strength are encountered, a steady- 
alarm signal of two beeps per second is 
sounded, thus providing a "reminder" to driv- 
ers to stay wittiin the speed limits. 

The Radar Intercept, model IN has a sug- 
gested retail price of $299,95.— Leisure 
Time Development Corporation, 1931 Mott 
Avenue, Far Rockaway. NY 1 1 691 . 

CONTROL CENTER, Mr, Video Master Con- 
trol Center provides six video inputs and 
three outputs, which will accommodate two 




CIRCLE 143 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



mi 



introduces^ 
JVew ^'^JMore Verj'at 
Slit'N-WrapTool^ 
for Wire- 



Count Wire Wraps 
Electronically 

Get 3 to 9 Wraps 

Eliminate Hand- 
Held Wire End 

at Wrap Start with New 
Wire Grip Housing! 

300 Foot 
Wire Spool 

with Tertsion Regulator 
to Reduce Wire Breal<age 
Six Wire Colors available 



CO 

o 
z 
o 
cc 

H 

o 



lU 

Q 
o 
< 

44 



Battery 
& Manual 
Models 
Available { 



PI 84-7 

$175.00 

IIOV A.C. 
60Hz 





t^Advantan tages: 




View of wire at 
end of bit being 
wrapped on poet. 



Faster and Easter Wrapping 
No Stripping 
No Pre cutting 
No Premeasuring 
No Loading 
Daisy Chain Wraps 
Quick Change Bits 
Reliable Wraps Meet 
MIL-STD1130A, par. 5.6 
U.S. & Pormgn 
htants 



655 PecfMS^e^mieQmpami 



12460 Gladstone Ave., P.O. Box 4336, Sylmar, CA 91342-0336, phone (213) 365-966f 

Price Subject to Change Without Notice. 828108 



sets and a VCR input and output. A 13- 
pushbutton control panel provides complete 
and convenient video-system selection. 

The Mr. Video Master Control Center is 
priced at $49.95. — Jascon Products Co,, 
Inc., 21 7 NE 46th. Oiclahoma City. OK 731 1 . 

PANEL METER, model 555, is a micro- 
processor-based instrument offering many 
display, measuring, and monitoring features. 
This software- programmable bargraph meter 
provides up to ± 0.2% digital accuracy with 
an analog display for process control, medic- 
al electronics, relay meter, quality control, 
and machine-tool and test-equipment ap- 
plications. 

Standard ranges are 0-50 mV, 0-1 mA and 
4-20 mA vifith a dual channel (two separate 
inputs and outputs) standard -display mode. 
Other internal ranges are available from 50 
millivolts to 200 volts, and 500 microamps to 
1 00 millamps, Tiie model 555 can be con- 
verted to single channel simply by removing a 
jumper wire, thus permitting the second 
channel to operate as an expanded scale for 
Improved resolution, or for visual storage and 
display of set points. 




CIRCLE 144 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Multiple {DIP switch selectable) readout 
provides 32 possible outputs on the 50-bar 
LED display. Displays include: negative full 
scale, positive full scale, suppressed zero for 
transducer Interface, and zero center. Differ- 
ent displays may be shown on each channel 
of a dual channel if desired. Readout modes 
are also selectable and include 45 or 160- 
millisecond update, standard meter, or 
single/dual setpoint control. 

The model 555 is priced a! $199.00. — 
Triplett Corp., One Triplett Drive. Bluffton, 
OH 45817. 

TRANSCEIVER, model rS-430S. is an all 
solid-state SSB. CW. and AM transceiver. 
with FM optional, it is designed to cover the 
160-10 meter amateur bands, including the 
new WARC bands, and also incorporates a 
150l<H2-30 MHz general-coverage receiver 
that has an exceptionally wide dynamic 
range. 

Other features include dual digital VFO's, 
eight memories, memory scan, program- 



CiRCLE 27 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



New!...the 25" Heathkit 
Television Computer System 



Introducing the new 
GR-3000... the first 
information center, 
telephone, terminai, 
video bulletin boaitl, 
modem and micro- 
computer interface... 
all part of the most 
future-thinking color 
television available 
lot tomorrow, today. 



The GR-3000 Television Computer 
System is the only receiver de- 
signed to bring you a II the unlimited 
information plus entertainment In 
this spectacular new era of multi- 
source televiewing. 

An exclusive new 
microprocessor- 
based "teleplex" 
receiver. 

The GR-3000 Is on 
expandable kit with 
plug-in capacity for eight micro- 
processor controlled modules. The 
basic modules are here now. In 
coming months, you can add new 






internal components to be ready 
for more advanced data retrievai, 
telephonic networking, and other 
growing life-service technologies. 
But even now, with standard chassis, 
GR-3000 istelevision 
as you've never seen 
it before. Why? 
ill-Ill WsS A multi-level screen 

display delivers your 
choice of 4 test pat- 
terns, super-steady Monitor 
Mode, and the Message Center 
with 16 combinational text and 
backdrop colors. The broadcast 
screen offers direct audio and vid- 
eo i/o, on ultra-clear picture with 
channel, time and date overlay. 
Six screens of 'help' hints make 
the system user-friendly 
infrared telemetry Remote 
Control. This 56-key pad 
can access almost every 
pfogrommabie feature 
under microcommand, in- 
cluding ail adjustments for 
picture correction. And the 
imagination-stretching Learn 
Mode function, for infinitely 
versatile sequenced oper- 
ation. Type in personal 
messages on your GR-3000 
and the real-time calendar 
clock displays them when- 
ever you want. 



Battery back-up preserves 

important data. And an 

Exclusion Password will 

protect preset picture 

(ideiity parameters. 

More to come. 

New modules are arriving 
soon, to bring you further 
into the teleconsumerage: 
Directory Dialer and 
Modem Interface. 
GR-3000 Will become a 
two-way speaker phone 
with memory, auto-dial 
and modem capabilities. 
Serial Interface will 
instantly access outside 
computer services and infor- 
mation, plus provide RS-232/C 
interface with any compatible 
computer in the world, 
and work as a 
superb color jiajS 

graphics terminal. jlli*[ 
The Programmer 
wilt odd greater 
memory for 
programming TV 
functions and control 
protocol for remote computing. 

View a GR-3000 today at your 
nearby Heathkit Electronic Center, 
or act now and call toll-free 
800-253-0570 for Visa or Master- 
Card orders. 

p. ______ 

Get more information in the 



FREE 



HEATHKIT CATALOG 

Mall to: 

Heath Company, 

Dept. 020-022 

Benton Hortxsr, Ml 49022 



Ma me. 



Add ress . 
City 



-Zip. 



not just a Iv 



GX-390 



Heathkif 



Heath 



Company 



simulated recaption 



CIRCLE IB ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




£ 



ta 

o 

§ 



o 

LU 

_l 
ID 

Q 
< 
CC 

46 



GRAB HOLD Of 1983 TECHNOLOGY 
WITH A SAMS BOOK! 

Learn about digital basics, working with fiber optics, 
generating electronic music, building intrusion alarms, 
managing home energy with your microcomputer, and morel 
Find out now YOU can do them all with these Sams Books: 

HOWARD W. SAMS CRASH COURSE IN DIGITAL 
TECHNOLOGY is our newest Sams Crash Course! It quickly 
provides you with digital circuit fundamentals, including 
state-of-tne-art components, ICs, techniques, methods, and 
developments. No prior knowledge of digitals is necessary! 
No. 21845, $20.95 

BUILDING AND INSTALLING ELECTRONIC INTRUSION 
ALARMS (3rd Edition) helps you build your own protection 
against robbery, burglary, and eavesdropping in your home 
or car. Also covers personnel identification and verification, 
as well as detection of concealed weapons! No, 21954, $10.95 
SAMS '" FIBER OPTICS COMMUNICATIONS, EXPERIMENTS & 
BOOKS PROJECTS clearly explains light-beam communication 
fundamentals, introduces you to the simple electronic 
devices used, and fets you participate in transmittinq and 
receiving both voice and music by means of a light beam 
travelling along a slender glass fiber! No, 21834, $15.95 

ELECTRONIC MUSIC CIRCUITS shows you how to build a 
custom electronic music synthesizer, outlines numerous other 
designs, and then shows you how to modify them to achieve 
particular responses. Many of the circuits can be used for 
special effects with guitars and other musical instruments. 
No. 21833, $16.95 

COMPUTER-ASSISTED HOME ENERGY MANAGEMENT helps 
you create a working energy-monitor for your home, using 
your microcomputer coupled to inexpensive temperature 
sensors and other easily built system hardware. Includes 
all details, necessary programs, documentation, and more. 
No. 21817, $15.95 

To order your Sams Books, call 80tM28-369e or 
317-298-5566 and reference AD256. 

HOWARD W. SAMS & CO., INC. 

430Q Vi/est 62nd Street- P.O. Box 7092 • Indianapolis, IN 46206 

Offer gopd inUSA only and expires 7/31/83. Prices subject to c flange without notice. 
In Canada, contact Lenbrook Industries. Ltd.. Scarborougfi. Ontario. 

CIRCLE 89 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



mabie band scan, fiuorescent-tube digital 
display, and all-mode squelch. There is also 
VOX, a speech processor, IF shift notch fil- 




CIRCLE 145 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



ter, and a narrow-wide filter-selector switcti 
for use with various optional filters. 

The suggested retail price of the model 
TS-430S is $899,95. — Trio-Kenwood 
Communications, Inc., 1111 West Walnut 
Street, Compton, CA 90220. 

SURGE PROTECTORS, the Transi-Traps. 
are the first devices available in the electron- 
ics market that are designed with an "isolated 
ground" that keeps damaging arc-energy off 
the chassis of communications equipment 
and routes it directly to ground. 




CIRCLE 146 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Tfie Transi-Trap protector features a 
replaceable A re- Plug cartridge that uses a 
special gas-filled cerar^iic tube that safely 
bypasses surges to ground and will fire 
thousands of times before requiring replace- 
ment. The Transi-Trap is connected in line 
between the receiver or transceiver and 
amplifier, or between Hie amplifier and the 
antenna. Configurations are available to 
accommodate UHF-type and N-type con- 
ductors, 200-watt and 2-kilowatt outputs, and 
in super low-loss models (0. 1 dB at 500 MHz) 
for use through VHP and UHF. 

The Transi-Trap units range in price from 
S19.95 to $44.95. — Alpha Delta Com- 
munications, PO Box 571 , Centen/ille, OH 
45459. 



EXPANDER, model MH89 Plus 3, is a bus 
expander for Heatti/Zenith model H89/Z90 
computers. This accessory exactly doubles 




CIRCLE 147 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



A bench full of dragons 
and no relief? 





Send in old reliable Keithley 179A. It coufd help you save the game. Get the high- 
performance accuracy you need today, and fietd-instaliable IEEE-488 compatibility you'll 
need soon. Our oversize LED is easier to read. And non-sinusoidal waveforms won't throw 
you a curve with our TRMS. Here's your workhorse Portable/Bench DMM at a price that 
won't strike out your budget. Keithley DMMs and Thermometers. The Dragon Slayers. 



KEITHLEY 



Write Tom Hayden for youritee, frameable 9x12" dragon poster. Keithley Instruments, Inc., 28775 Aurora Road, Cleveland, Ohio 44139. 
Phone 216-248-0400, Telex: 98-5469. 



179 A Features 

• Fiva full tgnctions 

• lO^V sensitivity 

• 20A capability 

• 0.04% DCV accuracy 

• HI-LO Q 

• Field -installable 
battery pack 

• Fleld-lnstaltable 
IEEE-488 Interface 

• $379 

Price U.S.A. only. 



CIRCLE 22 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



> 
< 



47 



Tn 



the I/O expansion capabilities of those 
machines, while keeping them all-in-one. The 
model MH89 Plus 3 replaces the right-hand 
accessory area with a 6-s!ot mother board, 
creating 3 additional slots. That provides am- 
ple room for the many accessory and periph- 
eral cards offered for those machines, with- 
out the need of externa! boxes or cables. 

The design of the model MH89 Plus 3 al- 
lows it to be installed in minutes, without 
soldering or cutting traces. In use, it is invis- 
ible to the user and requires no programming 
or system modification. The added slots 
occupy previously unused port addresses. 
Devices to be run off those slots should have 
their software configured for the new port 
number. 

The model MH89 Plus 3 keeps all acces- 
sory boards on the right side of the machine. 
It does not interefere with the left side 
memory-expansion area. All accessory cards 
remain vertical for best cooling. 

The model MH89 Plus 3 is priced at 
$150.00 plus a $5 shipping charge, comes 
with full documentation, and has a one-year 
warranty (CA residents add 6% tax). — Mako 
Data Products, 1441 -#B N, Red Gum, An- 
aheim, CA 92806, 

RECEIVER, model R-2000, is an all-mode 
communications receiver that covers 
l50kHz-30IVIHz in 30 bands. Designed to fill 
the needs of the short-wave listener as well 
as the radio amateur, this new radio is cap- 
able of receiving signals on Atvl, USB, LSB, 
CW, and FM, 

The model R-2000 has digital VFO's, 1 
memories that store frequency, band, and 
mode data, memory scan, programmable 



band scan, and dual 24-hour quartz clocks 
with a timer that can be programmed to turn 
the radio on and off on a pre-selected sched- 
ule. Additional features include a built-in 
lithium- battery memory back-up (estimated 




CIRCLE 118 ON FREE )NFORMATiOt4 CARD 

5-year lite), fluorescent-tube digital display, 3 
built-in IF filters with switch, manual up/down 
band scan, squelch, "S" meter, noise- 
blanker, and RF step attenuator. It operates 
on 100/120/220/240 VAC, or may be op- 
erated on 13.8 VDC using an optional DCK-1 
cable kit. 

The model R-2000 has a suggested retail 
price of $599.95. — Trio-Kstiwood Com- 
munications, Inc., 1111 West Walnut 
Street, Compton, CA 90220. 

DMM, model 8026B, is an eight-function 
handheld model that features true RMS AC 
capabilities while retaining all of the perfor- 
mance and versatility features of the earlier 
models in the 80268 series. Like those oth- 
ers, the model 80268 has an easy-to-read 
front panel; a heavy-duty 600- volt dual-fuse 
system on the current input to protect against 
high-energy inputs; non-skid rubber feet and 
a locking tilt bail, which keep the instrument 




CIRCLE 119 OM FREE INFORMATION CARD 



firmly in place; two-year parts and labor war- 
ranty, and a one-year calibration cycle. An 
audible continuity checker is also built In. 

The model 80268 is priced at S219.00. — 
John Fluke Mfg. Co., Inc., PO Box 
C9090, Everett, WA 98206. R-E 



NO ONE ELSE HAS LOWER SCOPE PRICES! 




2 Probes 

Included 

With Each 

Scope! 

TOLL FREE: 

(800)423-5922. i. 



aUAL TIME BASE! 

CALIBRATED DELAYED SWEEP! 




DIRECT 

FACTORY 

CONSUMER 

REBATE 

CERTIFICATE 

INCLUDEDI 



tOOMHi BKP1590, 7DMHZ BKP1S70 

1 mV/divison sensitivily 

SOO^fV/diuision cascade sensitivity 

Foitr-inpul operation provides trigger view 

on 4 separate inputs 

Alternate time base operation 

20 MHi bandwidth limiler CHI S CH2 



100 MHz 

8 TRACE - 4 CHANNEL 
BPflKPI590 List Price: $1995.0[) 

$1449.00 

[ShiDtiinJ WeioM IS Ita.l 

SAVE $546.00!! 



• Ligtited function pustibuttons employing 
electronic switching witti non-volatile 
RAM memory 

• 8 X 10 cm Internal graticule CRT 

• Video sync separator standard 

• Dual intensify controls 

• Voltage and current protie calibcators 
(BKP1590 only) 

70 MHz 

8 TRACE - 4 CHANNEL 
BPBKP1570 List Price: St 395.00 

$995.00 

SAVE $400.00!! 



BKPtS}5 SPECIFICATIDHS: 

• 35MHI rcE[»fise: usable beyond 50 MHi • 2 
mV/cm vertical $«n$itivitv » Signal delay Nrie fx 
accurate view ot iilfjh Irequency pulse leadmg edge 

• Alternate trigger capability • ALitomatic or 
manual seleclm ot CHOP AND ALrEfiNATE dual- 
tr^ce display * Variable tuld-Dfl lor accurate pulse 
train display • Videg sync separators standard • 
Built-in trisBsrino fillers • PDA CBT wilb P31 
phosphn • 10:1/rsf;direi]t prnbes in^uded • 
Dilferentiai input catrabliity 

35 MHz 

DUAL THAGE - TRIGGERED 
RQBKPIS35 List Price S950.00 

$695.00 

(Snipping Weight 2D lbs.) 

SAVE $430.00!! 

mCLUDttiQ REBATE 



BKP1530 SPECIFICATIONS: 

• Delayedsweepo&eFatiofiJor sweep ^xfkansKpn up 
to lOOOV • 5 mV tJivisim sensitivity selectaWe 2 
mV to 20MIH? * Variable lK>kl-on pulse Irm 
display • Singic^sweep lor nonrepelitive wave- 
torms • BifiLl'in triggefing filters • VnJ«o sync 
sepa/aiof siandard • CHOP tx AlJERNATE dts- 
play • DUferentiaHrtput capability • 11.7 nSise 
tim« lor shorl dtir^tlipn putse£ ■ Alternale tri^r 
capability • Front panel x-yopefation • lOil/ref- 
erefK^direct prtjlK^ included 

00 MHz 

DUAL TRACE - DEIAYED SWEEP 
80BKP1530 List Price: $875.00 

$625.00 

(Stnppina WeigM JO lbs.) 

SAVE $301.00!! 

IMCLUOIMO REBATE 



PRIORITY ONE ELEC TRONICS 9161 D E E R l N G AVE. • CHATSWORTH, CA 91311 
DRDEH toll FIIEE (SOOl 423-5922 - CA, AK, hi gall [213) 709-511 1 RETAIL STORES: [Chatswtirth:] (2131 709-5464 (Irvine:) (714) B60-I41 1 

Terms. U.S. VISA. MC. BAC. Cliecli Money Order. U.S. Funds Only CA rcsidcnis add 6>A% Sales Tax. MINIMUM PREPAID ORDER SI 5 00 Include MINIMUM SHIPPING S HANDLING ol S3.00 lortbe (irsia lbs. plus 40e for each 
addillonal pound Orders oner 50 lbs. sent freight rajllect Just in case, please include your (hone reimher. Prices subject to ctiange wittBUI nolice We will bo our best to maintain prices tbrwigh May, 1963. Cndrt Caid ortlers will be 
ctiarfled appropriate freight II you tiaven't received your Winter '83 EngintBrinij Selection guide, send for your cooy todav" Sale prices (or pcepaKj orders only 



CIRCLE 72 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




'^^ Electrqi^jcs Boatt Club 



Hundreds of time- and 

money-saving ideas for 

hobbyists, experimenters 

and technicians! 



Select 5 fact-filled volumes 
for onlv $ *? 95 ^*°*^* ^^^^ "*" *° *^^-^^i 



HADIO 

HOSBiisrs 

HASDBOOK, 




7 very good reasons to try 
Electronics Book Club 

Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214 

• Reduced Member Prices. Save 20% to 75% on books sure 
to increase your know-how 

• Satisfaction Guaranteed. All books returnable within 10 
days without obligation 

• Club News Bulletins. All about current selections— mains, 
alternates, extras— plus bonus offers. Comes 13 times a year 
with dozens of up-to-the-minute titles you can pick from 

• "Automatic Order." Do nothing, and the Main selection 
will be shipped automatically! But ... if you want an Alter- 
nate Selection -or no books at all —we'll follow the instruc- 
tions you give on the reply form provided with every News 
Bulletin 

• Continuing Beneflts. Get a Dividend Certificate with every 
book purchased after fulfilling membership obligation, and 
qualify for discounts on many other volumes 

• Bonus Specials. Take advantage of sales, events, and 
added- value promotions 

• Exceptional Quality. All books are first-rate publisher's 
editions, filled with useful, up-to-the-minute information 



m 



ELECTRQI^iJCSBaahCLUB 

Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214 



Please accept my membership in Electronics Book Club and 
send the 5 volumes circled below, billing me $2.95 plus 
shipping and handling charges. If not satisfied, I may return 
the books within ten days without obligation and have my 
membership cancelled, I agree to purchase 4 or more books 
at reduced Club prices (plus shipping/handling) during the 
next 12 months, and may resign any time thereafter. 

33B 973 1108 1120 1128 1160 1183 1199 

1211 1233 1245 1276 1277 1268 1300 

1306 1332 1346 1383 1393 1406 1435 1436 

1451 1465 1474 1476 1466 1506 1536 



Name 



Phone - 



Address 
City 



State 



Zip- 



oiaie ■ . z.]p 

Valid far new meiiibers only. (Orders outside U-S- ar Canada must be prepaid in 
InlemalionaJ Money Orders in LT.S. doJUrs. Canada mujt remit in U-S. dollars.] 
This order subject to acceptance by Electronics Book Club- RE-583 ! 



CIRGLE 25 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



CD 

49 



r 



COMPUTER CORNER 



Selecting a terminal 

LES SPINDLE* 



o 



< 
EC 

SO 



MANY PEOPLE PURCHASE THEIR F[RST 

microcomputer system as a complete 
package that includes the computer, 
video display, printer, and software. 
There are those, however, who will want 
to buy the components separately. In do- 
ing so, they can put together a system 
tailored to their specific requirements. 

Last month, we discussed the options 
available when purchasing a printer for 
your computer system. This month, we 
will explore data terminals. 

A terminal consists of two main parts; 
the keyboard and the display screen. The 
terminal accepts data from the user (via 
the keyboard) and sends it to the computer 
where it is processed. The terminal then 
gives the processed data back to the user 
(via the display screen). Besides the CRT 
screen and keyboard, the terminal in- 
cludes a built-in controller and com- 
munications port(s). 

What to look for 

Let's first look at a few design factors 
that should be considered when you shop 
for a terminal. Many studies have been 
conducted to explore possible health 
hazards connected to using inferior or 
imporperly-situated CRT screens. Eye- 
strain, neck- muscle stress, and headaches 
have all been traced to improperly used or 
poorly designed computer workstations. 
Terminals that have been designed to 
eliminate those strain factors are termed 
"ergonomic," and the right tenninal can 
help you avoid such problems. 

One feature you may want to consider 
is a detatchable keyboard — it gives you 
much more flexibility. If your terminal is 
made up of two sections (keyboard and 
display screen), then is it easier to place 
them where they will be more comfort- 
able to use. For instance, if you need a lot 
of tabletop space when you are using your 
computer, you can put the display on a 
shelf above the table. (That's something 
you can't do if the keyboard is attatched to 
it — unless you have very long arms.) If 
you need still more space to lay out plans, 
papers, or what have you, then you can 
even put the keyboard in your lap. If you 
do decide on a detachable keyboard, I'd 
advise getting one with a coiled cord — it 
keeps things neater. 

A further note on keyboards: If you will 

•Managing Editor. Interface Age magazine 





FIG. 1 

be entering large amounts of numeric 
data, then a keyboard with a separate 
number-entry keypad will be almost a 
necessity. Entering numerical data on a 
standard keyboard can be very time con- 
suming, frustrating, and inefficient. 

Displays 

There are some things that you'll want 
to look for — or should I say that there are 
some things that you'll want to avoid. 
First, you want the display to be stable, A 
display that flickers or jitters excessively 
can be an annoyance, a distraction, and 
fatiguing as well. You will also want to 
make sure that the size of the characters is 
adequate for legibility. If the screen is too 
small, the letters will be cramped together 
and eyestrain will occur. A i 2-inch 
screen displaying a standard format of 
1 ,920 characters (24 lines of 80 charact- 
ers) is often considered a good size both 
for legibility and for its ability to display a 
reasonable amount of infomiation on the 
screen at one time. Also, since a line on 
8 'A X 11 paper is generally about 66 
characters long, the 80-column display 
can give you a good idea of what your 
final output will look like. 

The size of the screen is not the only 
factor that determines the size of the 
characters. For example some terminals 
display fe we r-but- larger characters than 
others — say, 40 per line instead of the 
more-or-less standard 80. Although you 
want the size of the characters to be rea- 
sonably large, you don't want them to be 



too large — it limits the usefulness of the 
terminal for many serious applications 
(such as word processing). 

Another feature to consider in examin- 
ing the terminal is variable brightness. A 
terminal should have a brightness control 
knob — much like the picture adjustments 
on a typical television — or some other 
means (such as software control) to allow 
you to set it for maximum readability. 

Some terminals do not include the abil- 
ity to highlight certain characters. High- 
lighting is accomplished by putting 
characters in reverse video. Reverse 
video is simply what its name implies. If 
your terminal normally displays light 
characters on a dark background, then 
reverse video would show dark characters 
on a light background. The highlighting 
can be used to make certain characters 
stand out. For example, in a word- 
processing application, a block of text 
that you want to delete, move, or change 
can be shown in reverse video so that it 
stands out. 

Some terminals use blinking characters 
instead of highlighting for the same pur- 
pose. Others use half-intensity charact- 
ers. Still other terminals are capable of 
producing both reverse video and half- 
intensity characters (and may even in- 
clude blinking ones). 

While reverse video, etc. is normally 
controlled by the software that you're us- 
ing with your computer, some terminals 
are not capable of producing certain types 
of displays, even if the software calls for 
them. 

Scrolling is another feature that you 
should look for on a tenninal. Some ter- 
minals allow you to scroll only line-by- 
line or only page- by- page. Others permit 
both line-by-line scrolling and page- by- 
page scrolling — a definate advantage. In 
many applications (but not all) scrolling, 
like reverse video, is controlled by the 
software. However, keep in mind that 
even if the software permits (or demands) 
scrolling, the terminal may not. 

There is one point we should mention 
before moving on. When you are buying 
software, you should check it carefully 
and compare it with other similar pack- 
ages to make sure that it takes advantage 
of the full range of features that you have 
on your own terminal. 

Other factors to keep in mind are 
graphics capabilities and upper/lower 




LEARN HOW MKROPROCESSORS WORK FOR $149195. 



The Micro-Professor MPF-1 is a 
serious, hands-on teaching device used 
by colleges and universities, technical 
schools, corporate training programs, 
and individuals, worldwide. 

The heart of the MPF-1 is a Z-80 micro- 
processor It is specifically designed^to 
aid you in learning the architecture 
of the most popular 8-bit central 
processing unit on the market. In 
addition, with the MPF-1 you can do 
breadboarding and prototyping for both 
hardware and software applications. 

The Micro-Professor MPF-1 features 
I 2k bytes of RAM (expandable to 4k) 
I 2k bytes of ROM {expandable to 8k) 
I 36 key calculator-type keyboard 
I Tiny BASIC interpreter for help in 
learning assembly language 
I Built-in speaker 

I Cassette recorder interface for program 
storage 
I 24 input/output lines 
I 3.5 X 1.36 inch breadboard area 
I Two 40-pin busses for the standard CPU 
and optional CTC/PIO allows forfull 
expansion to Z-80 architecture 
capabilities 
I AC power supply included 
I Three instruction manuals include 
source monitor listing plus 18 experi- 
ments in hardware and software 
and the Micro-Professor comes in an 
attractive book-style carrying case for a 
micro price of only $149.95 with a 90-day 
unconditional written warranty. 



Z-80 is a registered trademark of Zilog Inc. 
CIRCLE 84 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



User options include 

Thermal Printer (PRT-MPF) $99.95 

20 column, alphanumeric, printer, in 

BASIC, with disassembler 

EPROM Programming Board 

(EPB-MPF) $169.95 For all 5 

yoltEPROMs(lKB,2KB,4KB). 
Read, copy, list and 
verify capabilities. 
Speech Synthesizer 
Board (SSB-MPF) 
$139.95 A vocabulary 

of 1200 H- words plus more in the future. 

If you're serious about learning (or 
teaching) how microprocessors work, 
now is the time to order the Micro- 
Professor 

Individuals using the Micro-Professor 
MPF-1 outside of structured classroom 
situations should have at least a 



rudimentary knowledge of 
microcomputertechnology. We will 
provide a list of appropriate literature 
to those who request it 





To order call toll free r 800-638-1542 
In Calffomia call 408-773-8400 




I 
I 
I 

I 



Mult:it:ach Electrortics Inc. 

Name I PI ease Print) 

Address 

Citv 

Zip 



State 

Signature „_^ , 

Check or mnnev order enclosed D 

VisaD MasterchargeD 

Card No.^ Expires . 



For turther tnfornation itr order 

In U.S. and Canada mail to: 
Multitech Electrcinics Inc. 
195 West El Caraino Real 
Sunnyvale, CA 34086 
Tel: 408-773-84DO 
Tex- 17G004 

MPF-1 Micro- Professor 

PRT-MPF Therrral Printer 

EPB-MPF EPROM Programming Board 

SSB-MPF Speech Synth esiier Board 

Shipping and Handling 

California residents add sates tex 

TOTAL 



Outside of North America trail to: 
Multitech Industrial Corporation 
977 Min Shen E Road, 105 
Taipei, Taiwan, ROC 
Tel. 02-769-1225 
TWX 19162 MULTIIC, 
23756 MUCrilC 



Qty. 



ArtiL 



S 149.95 
^.95 
$169.95 
S139.95 
$4.95 



A.9S 



case character capacities. If you plan to 
display charts, graphs, orother visual for- 
mats on your screen (like what is shown in 
Fig. 1 on the MVI-lOO terminal from Col- 
orgraphic Communications Corp.. Atlan- 
ta, GA), check the range of graphics 
capabilities available with the terminal. 
Some units may only be able to do block 
or straight-line graphics, but not curves. 
A few — usually inexpensive — terminals 
can display only upper-case letters. That 
won't be very useful for you if it is your 
plan to use the computer for word- 
processing applications. 

We should not end this discussion of 
displays without mentioning color 
capability. Although many feel that color 
displays are not necessary (and in most 
business applications they really aren't), 
color can add emphasis when you need it. 
For example, they can be useful in any 
situation that requires the display of 
graphs, bar or pie charts, and the like. 

Dumb and intelligent terminals 

There are two types of terminals — 
dumb and intelligent (or smart). An in- 
telligent terminal can be custom- 
programmed by the user, while a dumb 
terminal cannot. For example, many in- 
telligent terminals, when coupled with 
the appropriate software, use special- 
function keys that add rapid and in- 
stantaneous commands to the standard 
data-manipulation functions. For in- 



stance, if yoQ often use a particular 
function — moving blocks of text around, 
for example — the terminal can be pro- 
grammed to accomplished that with one 
touch of a special-function key. A dumb 
terminal, on the other hand, may require 
many more steps or keystrokes — -and 
much more time — to accomplish the 
same task. A dumb terminal, because it 
can do nothing more than act as a key- 
board and display screen is often referred 
to as a "glass teletype." 

There are two other factors should be 
considered in selecting a terminal — the 
baud rate and the operational modes (half- 
duplex or full -duplex). 

The baud rate is the data-transmission 
rate. Most tenuinals have adjustable baud 
rates and you should be sure that the one 
you purchase also does — we'll explain 
why. Say, for example, that you are using 
your terminal to communicate over the 
phone lines (via a modem) with an in- 
form antion network or remote data base. 
Then you will have to send data at 3(X) 
baud. However, if the terminal is hard- 
wired to an in-house computer or another 
terminal, then you can use a much faster 
rate — ^typically up to 9600 baud. (Divid- 
ing the baud rate by 10 closely approxi- 
mates the number of characters transmit- 
ted per second. For example, a baud rate 
of 75 would transmit about 7.5 characters 
per second.) 

You may also want to be able to switch- 



select either half-duplex or full-duplex 
operation. Let's see what that means. In 
the half-duplex mode, any character that 
you type will be displayed on your screen 
at the same time that it is transmitted to 
the network or computer. In the full- 
duplex mode, however, the character you 
type is not displayed until the terminal 
receives an echo from the computer, data 
base, etc. Full-duplex manipulation will 
cause a bit of a time lag, although it's 
usually not serious. However, in a multi- 
user system, the process will sometimes 
slow diings down considerably. 

The biggest advantage to the full- 
duplex mode is verification of correct 
data transmission to the CPU. If there is a 
malfunction in this passage of informa- 
tion, you will not know about it in the 
half-duplex mode, as the character you 
entered will still be displayed on the 
screen. Meanwhile, the CPU will be re- 
ceiving "garbagfe" (the commonly-used 
term for erroneous data), which you will 
not be aware of until you try to print out a 
document or otherwise extract some of 
the information. 

For applications requiring frequent 
simultaneous use of many terminals, you 
may want to use the half-duplex mode for 
the sake of speed. The terminal should 
include a switch that will allow you to use 
either half- or full-duplex modes, so 
you'll be able to use it for the greatest 
variety of applications. 



R-E 




LINEAR 


™ 




lll»Oh< 


3» 




luhlh 


30 




LMKIH 






tUXTH 


4* 




1V»«AH 


i2t 




lmIoSk 


(3i 




LM31I5 


145 




LW31K 


sa 




LUM rv. 


3«S 




LUSHM 


14* 




LWUJ 


1 55 




Lwuax: 


4 as 




1,MJ}< 


55 




LUU1 


» 




lmmi 


1 25 




LU3» 


t5 




LUUO 


1 10 




LHM1 


145 




l^UJW 


1^ 




LUU1 


1 H 




Llftll 


i1 




LUitiS 


1 10 




LUSH 


3^5 




LWH3 


04 




LHMc 


1 45 




LUT(U 


75 




LMI« 


40 




LMftO 


75 




LUTt1 


49 




lM7» 


1 r^ 




LU7» 


95 




LM733 


35 




I,M74l-a 


Ji 




i.uf *l^.^* 


3S 




1.UT4IH 


li 




\.W*J 






LU^7S 






lUO 


ito 




tut 






tuo 


1 t5 




13M 


iSi 




13TJ 


4U 




lJt9l 


55 




14U 


!-& 




t4«V 


^t 




LJM 


A5 




IU« 


1 55 




4»l 


1 W 




4SSI 


75 




»r» »ri 


4&0 




A*^ lua.a 


SfSfl 




l35Cr WH 


521 




MM U« 






]3£ 






ejs nCMiio 


1550 




jiie-iwHS fl^ia^s 




4it4':»N3 


It35 




4114 llDNS 


n't 




^H 


H 





Syntron Computer 

* 48K RAM * Runs Apple 

Hardware & Software 

^669." 



RANA Systems 

Apple Drives 

435.™ w/controller 
'385." w/o controller 



SUPER 3,5ampP0WER SUPPLY 

lor APPLE—*- $95 .00 Is' 



Diskette Storage BOX 

*2,50ear^ $10.00: 13.60"^ $15.00 



BareEtori^flPLtH 



CONCORD 



I 



?<nO B E I A PAL MA 
ANAHEIM CA '>2a06 

?i4 632 6790 

u,m "■*' -"'".= '"' 

110-49 **?«' »?M-*93 -'90B s*rtd*1o^ 
^ - 99 -4"= SOO 995 - ' 1** toi 



MONITORS ^ ^ 
ZENITH *ZVM-121 

12in. 15MHI./GREEN Ptx* 
'^*99,D0T(V 

BMC#BM-12EUN 

12m20 MHz /Gf^EN Phot. 
Non-Qta4«ScrMn 
I^S13400^ 

BMC#BM1401RGB 

13in,*RGB* COLOR 
with Apfile interface!! 

'— *425,0OlV 



COMPONENTS 



CO 

o 

o 

I- 

o 



tu 

6 

Q 
< 

52 



48KRAM 



Keyboard 

. $399. 



Pwr. Supply 



Microswitch: Power Sup Dij 

* 7S.0O ; ' 79.00 



APPIE 
Hclertnce Mint 
*18.oo 



Diskette SALE!! 

^vwU "Wabash' 

SS/j^*17.50 $20.00 
SS/DD 27.40 3040 
DS/SD 34-90 
DS/DD 3240 37.40 




741300 

74L9C12 
74L$03 
74LSe4 
T4LS09 
1'4L»( 
74L3W 
74LStO 
74lS[1 
T4L3tI 

74 LSI a 

;4LS14 
741515 
74LSI0 
74Li2l 
74l,Ki 
74LS»S 
741,3*7 
74L3ia 
74-LS» 
74LS)J 
74L«U 
T4LS3r 
74I,5H 
T4LS4J 
T4L341 
r4L,S4fl 



T4Sm 
74903 

74»4 
T4S« 

T4UI 
743W 
T4StO 
74SII 
745 15 
74S» 

74530 



r4u7q 

74L374 

TJLSIS 

r4L«fe 

T4LBTt 
74LSS-3, 

r4i.aft5 

74L3H 
T4LS« 

74 L$I>1 
T4L9BZ 
74LSU 

r4uiM 

74LSH 

]'4LS10>' 
74L3tOS 
T4LST13 
741.3^13 
74L3114 
r4LSlM 
74LSl*J 
74L;St2S 
74L 5 1 ?C 
74LS«« 

74Laiis 

741. SIM 

74LS«37 
74L5lSe 



ja r4L3l3t 

:J4 74LS1.45 

35 ]'4L3t47 

31 74l,31<4t 

3« 74Lail1 

4 J f41,SlSJ 

41 741,3^^ 

*0 744.atS4 

33 741.31 se 
M 74L315? 
4^ ;4L3l&« 
SO 74:L$ieO 
« 74L31fl1 
«5 T4LS1Ba 
« 74i.aiC3 
jfl 74L31M 
31 741^1 05 
31 7dL31H 
» r'L£l£l 

34 741.31 5« 
4i 74LS170 
45 74lS'l79 
4ft T4L3174 
44 T'LSira 
H 741311] 
M 74LS1» 
3« 74L$1d1 
15 74L31II 
» 74131 13 



K 7453? 

M 74837 

30 743]* 

Ug 74SaO 

JO 74351 

30 74S»* 

J5 74Ha 

M 74374 

1% 74U? 

35 74Sa« 

i5 74311! 

23 T43>:4 

» 74S13? 



44 743131 
.9% r4Si40 
15 74$ I ST 
3a 743157 
35 ?4£lM 
35 74^111 
aa 749143 
H 74STT4 

»» 743175 

^i 74Sia; 

45 74SIBA 

jio 745149 



90 74L31B4 

1 IB 7413145 

1 75 74L31H 

1 35 741.SV*)' 

iS 74LS211 

90 74L»40 

1 75 74L$747 

T!l 74L5743 

75 74L5243 

95 741S344 

«5 74LU45 

«« 74LS347 

B5 74|.SJ4g 

«« 744.3244 

45 741.S3&1 

*S ■74L3SM 

45 f4LV97 

I 75 74L$?VI 

I $3 74L339« 

I 55 74l.giU 

1 3ft 74LBJH 

45 74L5373 

53 ^*^.^a7i 

15 741.3140 

l«5 74LS2U 

» l*\.t39ti 

4V 74LS?U 

75 74LS2B9 

7a 74LSSB« 



B& 7431*4 

40 T43t«5 

95 74SJ01 

14 743740 

« 743?4I 

I Jft 743744 

3 75 743»1 

H 7433'Bd 

as T4SJ57 

1 75 74S?54 

t M TA&itO 

«ftS r4S3'75 



49 74LS2t| 

45 74Lx3J3 

75 741^93 

79 74L3553 

95 74LKH5 

95 74LS4U 

13 74L5»7 

95 74LMU 

135 741.8373 

M 74I.H74 

1 45 74LS375 

t 10 74L$377 

I 10 7413379 

I 1Q 74L5379 

99 )<4iL93U 

55 74i3340 

94 7419343 

aa 74l.$jf5 

175 741.31t4 

99 74L9440 

4a 74L34J3 

145 7413444 

45 74L$Mft 

145 74LH70 

45 74LUH 

19 74t.$U9 

«» 7415997 

45 74LS713 



1 25 743340 

lis 745317 

ejQ 74S74B 

1 95 743344 

1 aa 74S344 

7 95 74^73 

15 743374 

n 149317 

99 74S154 

15 74S4M 

55 1^49473 

17 95 74S474 



1 45 

2 79 
i74 
3H 

1449 



94^ 

545 
?4S 
24a 



SOCKETS 



1CV«,30 
KH.TO 
1£«TO 



IE 
KV1.X 

W1.7Q 

xnatt 



(507 595 4»0 

■922 475 ttai 

ea37 1639 voi 



i3i UiD 



12 50 4440 



295 B<4$ 

300 4447 
ig50 4450 



zso 

ZMCnj 3 95 J40PII? 549 £BC^Py 400 laOAPlO 
JVOCTC Hi 140310/3 12 SO ZNACtC 450 



I 






Now electronics technicians can get into VCR Servicing quickly and easily 

Learn professional VCR servicing 

at home or in your shop 

with exclusive videotaped 

r demonstrations 



Today, there are more than 10 milHon 
VCRs in use, with people standing in 
line to have them serviced. You can 
bring this profitable business into your 
shop with NRI professional training in 
VCR servicing. This top-level training 
supports the industry's claim that 
the best technicians today are those 
who service VCRs. 

Integrated Three-Way 
Self-Teaching Program 

In one integrated program, NRI 
gives you a study guide, 9 instructional 
units, 2 hours of video training tapes 
accompanied by a 32-page workbook 
that pulls it all together At home or in 
your shop, you'll cover all the basic 
concepts of video recording, mechani- 
cal and electronic systems analyses, 
and the latest troubleshooting tech- 
niques. Your workbook and instruction- 
al units also contain an abundance of 
diagrams, data, and supplementary 
material that makes them valuable addi- 
tions to your servicing library. 

The "How-To" Videotape 

Your NRI Action Videocassette uses 
every modern communications tech- 
nique to make learning fast and easy. 
You'll enjoy expert lectures and see 
animation and video graphics that make 
every point crystal-clear. You'll follow 
the camera eye into the heart of the 
VCR as step-by-step servicing tech- 
niques are shown. Both electronic and 
mechanical troubleshooting are covered 
. . . including everything from com- 
plete replacement and adjustment of the 
recording heads to diagnosing micro- 
processor control faults. 

Plus IVaining On All The 
New Video Systems 

Although your course concentrates 
on VCRs covering Beta, VHS. and Va" 
U-Matic commercial VCRs, NRI also 
brings you up to speed in other key 
areas. You'll get training in capacitance 
and optical video disc players, projec- 
tion TV, and video cameras. All are in- 
cluded to make you the complete video 
technician. There's even an optional 
final examination for NRl's VCR Pro- 
fessional Certificate. 



Covers Beta and VHS 
systems with actual 
instruction on 
videotape. 




The Best Professional 
Training 

This exclusive self-study course has 
been developed by the professionals at 
NRI. NRI has trained more television 
technicians than any other electronics 
school! In fact, NRI has consistendy 
led the way in developing troubleshoot- 
ing techniques for servicing virtually 
every piece of home entertainment 
equipment as it appears in the market- 
place. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

. . .15-Day No-Risk 

Examination 

Send today for the new NRI Self- 
Study Course in VCR Servicing for 



Professionals. Examine it for 15 full 
days, look over the lessons, sample the 
videotape. If you're not fully satisfied 
that this is the kind of training you and 
your people need to get into the profit- 
able VCR servicing business, return it 
for a prompt and full refund, including 
postage. Act now, and start adding new 
business to your business. 

Special Introductory Offer 

This complete VCR training course 
with two hour videotape is being 
offered for a limited time only, on 
orders received from this ad, at our low 
introductory price of $179.95, Save 
$20 by acting now! 
NRI Ti-aining For Professionals 
McGraw-Hil! Cotiiinuing Education Center 
39M Wisconsin Avenue Washinjton, DC 20016 



Y' LJ C I Get me started in profitable 
J. Lj\J • VCR servicing. Rush me my 
NRI self-study course in VCR Servicing for 
Professionals. 1 understand I may return it for 
a full refund within 15 days if not completely 
satisfied. 

PLEASE SPECIFY TAPE FORMAT DESIRED O VHS D BETA 

Name (pleue print 1 

Company 

Street 



NRI 

irnife 



NRI Training For Professionals 
McGraw-Hill Continuing 

Education Center 
3939 Wisconsin Avenue 
Washington, DC 20016 



City'Sme/Zip_ 



Enclosed is my D check D money order for SI 79.95 (D.C. residents add 65 tax) Make dtcirk jjayablc lo NRI 
Chaiielo D VISA D MaslerCaid . 



Inlerbank NumlKr 



Card Number- 
Signature^ 



. Expiration Date_ 



(requtmi tor cicdii card sales) 



ZSOO-OSS 



NEW IDEAS 



Liquid rosin flux 



AFTKR 1 RETIRED, MY INTEREST IN ELEC- 

tronics grew tremendously. Partly be- 
cause of that, 1 joined the RSVP (/?eiired 
Senior Voiuiiieer frogram) and volun- 
teered to help high-school electronics stu- 
dents in their electronics laboratory 
courses. Recently, the students began to 
make their own printed-circuit boards for 
[heir projects, and the instructor decided 
that the boards should be tinned (solder 
plated). Wbat the students would do was 
to load the board with solder and then sop 
it up with Solder Wick. There had to be a 
better way to tin a board than that! 

One improvement would have been to 
use some liquid rosin solder flux. Howev- 
er, that was not readily available, and an 
order would have taken months to fill, A 
solution was found, though — we made 
our own liquid flux. It's not very hard to 
do. and evei^ylhing you need is shown in 
Fig. 1. 



saw the price she paid for it I decided 
against it. However, i did manage to get 
my hands on an empty fingernail -polish 
remover bottle. That bottle was perfect 
for what I wanted to use it because it came 
with a handy applicator brush. A little 
acetone was used to clean both the bottle 
and the brush. 

The next problem was to find the rosin. 
A violin-repair shop was the source for 
that. I mashed up a bit of the rosin — a 
piece about as big as the end of my 
finger — and coaxed it into the bottle that 
was half-filled with acetone. It was easy 
to tell how much rosin to put in — it dis- 
solves very quickly, but little chunks of 
rosin form at the bottom of the bottle. 
\vhen you've reached the saturation 
point. Then, no more will dissolve. 

Now I had a little bottle of liquid rosin 
with its own applicator brush. It's a great 
way to put rosin flux on printed-circuit 




FIG. 1 



1 knew that the active ingredient in 
primed- circuit-board cleaners- 
acetone — dissolves rosin like crazy. So 1 
went to raid my wife's acetone-based 
fingernail -polish remover — but when I 



boards, to prime connections, to tin 
stranded wires, and so on. You can prob- 
ably get by without it: but, believe me, 
liquid rosin can make many jobs a lot 
easier. — Roger F. Sheldon 




NEW IDEAS 

This column is devoted to new ideas, 
circuits, device applications, construc- 
tion techniques, helpful Inints, etc. 

Aii putilished entries, upon publica- 
tion, will earn $25. In addition, Panavise 
wiii donate their model 333 — The Rapid 
Assembly Circuit Board Holder, having a 
retail price of $39.95, It features an eight- 
position rotating adjustment, indexing at 
45-degree increments, and six positive 
lock positions in the vertical plane, giving 
you a full ten-inch height adjustment for 
comfortable wrarking. (See photo below.) 




I agree to the above terms, and grant 
Radio-Electronics Magazine the right 
to publish my idea and to subsequently 
republish my idea in collections or com- 
pilations of reprints of similar articles. I 
declare that the attached idea is my 
own original material and that its publi- 
cation does not violate any other copy- 
right. I also declare that this material 
had not been previously published. 



Title of Idea 


Signature 


Print Name 




Date 


Street 


CSty 


State 


Zip 



Ivlail your idea along with this coupon 
to: New Ideas Radio- Electronics, 
200 Park Ave, South, 
New York, NY 10003 



54 



NETRQNICS NEW 16 BIT EX PLORER 88-PC ... $399.95 

rBM COMPATIBLE 







SiJ^^iiUMi 



'M 



UAIN It ItT TECHNOLOGY IN EASY LOWXOST STEPS. Thit 2-boordiyttom l*atur*i 

(1) an 906Smothor boord with o 5-3 lol umparm&n bus rhgt will ocCwpt ony har^ivgrvdRsignvd 
lor ]ht IBM p«rtonal compultr ond [1] a 64K [Bxpandabit to 356K) msmory beard ihot olio 
Fvotursi an IBMcompoTibltt R$ 23? commun icol ion^ port. AH circuiti ars funclicoally aquiva- 
(•rii Fo tb» rllM •xcopT foj' th» catseTr* ROMS Th«i m«an» that alf prsgrarris wrin^n in boiic 
d«ign*d ta run in an iSM can b* CDiYipil*d io run in this tyitmn and that ony dhsk-i?p«raiing 
KysTofn thol will njn on pn IBA^ will work dir*cliy in th» EXPLOREH SS-PC. Th« iyjtBrn monifor 
ROM included In iht Sroier't sysfanri Ivoluroi a usar-lriondly opttraiing syir*rri thai albwi 
«Qay program >9«f>«rol9CMl air>d dttbu^ing. Thv CCTmrriandi lnclud« dltploy/mcHdily memory... 
dtsplofyi'rTiodi^ r*gi)^rf,..inpuT''ovipiJt data lo 1/0 part) ... block n>Dv«...$ir>sEB^»t«p trace 
rnod«'...90''run with DptionoF braokpolnt and rtgiittr r*porr>...CQit«trft tood'-'iOvv with fils 
lob*1l...plu!l □ Cbmpt*t« lylt«m t«t program ehal l>$lt pnd rtpojis fondUion of ROM RAM. 
«ju*TT« int»rf(KB. iJm«r, &MA controU^r, inttrrup^ ctmiroOor. ond ih» communications port. 
Th*i* l*ii pro^arn> not only allow »Qty dtbugging ol sofrwar* bul ihty »fv* as hardwar* 
ar\d KtHwort l*arnFng Tools . 

T>je EXPLORER SS-PC STARTifi'S R3T includB» a molhw- boora, m*rTicyv l.-O board, all com- 
pon*nlt n**d«d. iod(«tv for IC's usad on* 62' pin bus coonKior and comptot* ai.s«mblv/t«l 
insinjctiani.. All you ne«d is a loldBring iron. loldar. a +■ 5 vol) ■© 3 amps 4 -5 S + '- 13 voli 
@!.S amp power supply, ond a standoird RS 233 itfrnlnal [N*tr(jr»ic5 hat 2 low-cost ooss to 
thootm Erom). 

OExplorarBS'F'CSFaDffrf Kit...S399.95 + 10 DOpSi {wir*d A t«f«l,add 100.00). 

OEx}ra£i2-pinconnscrors<2i4.Z5H. i I.OOpSi. 

If you do noF own a Tflrrrtinal ycn> may wonl to considwr using our IBM compotlbl* k^ybocrd 
[s»9 phoTa) in coniundioti wJth an IBM compaFibl* color grophics board. This comblnotion. 
olthough r»ot n»c»»«jrv ot ih« iniroductory Iwvl. may b« dnirobt* if yoo plon to vicpand iha 
EXPlORER KI-PC to b* fully IBM compatiblo. Th*sfl items rvquire ndditiooQl pdwor and ort 
only ovailobl* ^wired and tasrad as lollnwi: 

D IBM compotibiB keyboard,. S299.95 i- iC.OOp&i 

O IBM compotiblff color board... Sl?99.« + 10.00 p£i 

n Add i eioool ROM TBCjUi rad ... $35.00 




The Ej^PLORER 6Q'PC can b<p axpond'^ oi any paco you cttcidv. Invosi and loom at o pace 
thai is CDrnfcffioblfi for you. hlfiitronics is dvdicalvd to supplying th* f in&st hardware and soJt- 
warfr 1o mak* this o moaningful l«afning txpsrivncA. Hord disks, built-in modem board, 
•prom burner, print buffer lyilBm plus more wi(k be^ ovailobiB ihoilly. Th« following items 
Q ra Ova ilab^a now 

Deluxe heavy-duty steel cabmat ihat housvs eithef two 5V-" lloppi« or o 5'/*" hard di*k 
WJth one floppy. This cabinel leatures o bruih'finith front panel and a wood^grained sleeva 
thai g\v9-y the unit a reof pralessiional look. 

P EXPLORER eS-PCCabinei. SI W.*S + Ifl.OOpAi. 

A heai^duty op*n franr« power supply with ion rtwt con be used in your own cobinat or 
installed unto the Natronii; cobinei is available ai folJows: 

D 10 amp power supply for system ■«■ 2fioppi9s...SM'4.Q5 +■ 0.OOp<Si. 

D As above -h axirti powarfor I hard disk. ..$167,9S + 8 00 p4i 

DIBM compotible di<sk controltec board. Controls four 5'/^ " floppy drives {w.''? drive coble) 

D Avolloble wired and lAsiedon^.,, £230.00 + S.OOpfii. 

n Th* monitors arkd BKDS source tlitings ore □vailnble on either disk or hard copy al $35.00. 
Pleose specify formal and systam required. 

D ^NTELaoe6■eoe8l/se^ma^l^al...Sl5.00 - 1 Mpfii, 

THE 0086 BOOK by RECTOR fi ALEX .(56 DO h- 1 50pfii 

OSpecKil IBM compatible sys»m: with kevboonJ. dokir grophrci board, ibppy disk corttrol- 
Ear WK RAW. cabinet, slandard pow«r supply or»d o single SV-i" Floppy drive.., $1699,95 + 
25.00 p & i. 

'JAM PC is oregb^lered^fradenwrlti^JIIMCorparaf^ 



IXPLOBiBlJ 




Liini camptilin^ Irann Ihi grauiid up. Slirt with Ihe 
Exptorrr/as LbvbI 'A' IcH whJcl) inctudei an ijipand' 
ibit imDEher {turd. TAe Kil hcludet EEie 8085 CPU, 
2K Meniler prQ^rim ustd to inlvr. tesE, run and sive 
progrifnt ftlus the Rfts ip lUow you lo slan pn- 
Qfimmlng. Juit iiM i powtr supply ind Itrniiflal er 
h<x hiyteird. □ LEVEL A Itminsl veniM or 
D Ktx KfriMd viniflti 
129.9$ ^ 3.00 pai. 
D LbviI 'B' 49.99 + 2.00 
+ two 10D pin conniGtora 
(S'iJS II. and hjvt i ppw- 
trful S'tOD cornpuler. Add 
D Level r 39.96 -i- 2. DO 
pAI +■ fivi 100 pin connectors To incrtaie S1I 
ilali ID 6. Ud (neiT»fy uimg Iht JAWS tB'&4K S-lDa 
b»Fd or Bdd Ui Lovfrl 'W 4K EC fliam toiti 49.95 
+ 2.00 pAi. a Levtl E' 5.95 - 1.5D pli iildi dt 
CQdlnQ' for SK dI 271G epfdjni. Nf bcE i power supftly? 
Use Th« a 5 amp AP 1 al 39.95 - 2M pli Se^od 
dAi dl our low eail lerminili or utt the Q Hex key 
pid w/diiplay (t 69.95 -f Z.OQ pAi. □ Dctdna 
ifitatn cabinet 49.9S 
S.OO pAI. D DpHonal fin 
16. 5G. Now add G Micro 
t»tl 6K basic A a powerful 
D Text edhor/isscmbler 
In ROMS. iuiE 99.95 ». Add 
n I" ^m 499.95 -H 12.00 1^1. U Fk>p|iy Cen^ 
ircHer board 199.95 - 2.00 pAi. G Floppy caEhumi 
& power lupply 69.^5 - 3.0D p&i. U Twd drive 
ciUt 29.95 ^ 1,50 p4i. Hard diik alio ivjiMble 




OCnlR A SKCULMtfCl 

IXFLOBEK/ll P*K 

Q Itglnnvr fak (Save 526.00) - You fit Leve) 
A (Terminal Verstonj wtth Monllor Source Uiting 
(SE5 vaEjet API S^Amp power sup^liy. Intel £085 
Uiers ManuaL.|}^tg SISB 95} SPEaAL $16995 
plus $4 f&l 

U experimenter Pok jSivi $5MQ) You get 
Level A {Htx Keypad^DispUy Vefsifln} with Hex Key 
pitf/DisjiUy Intrt BQB5 Jier MinuaE. Level A Hex 
MeorEer Source Litlint and AP-I 5-amp. power sup- 
ply. {Heg. SZ79.95f SPECIAL $M9 95 plui SB p4i. 
a Special Mkratoti »A5IC Pak [S»< $103 I 
' You get Livils A [Terminal Veiiian]. B.O. (4k RAMf 
E. U Wcioioft In ROM. Ifittl 6065 Usff Minul.LairiJ 
A MpnitBf Sflurce LEtKivg and AP-1 5-amp. power 
ajp9(V ..(HiO 5439.70} SPECIAL S^Z9.95 pkis ST 
pAJ. G Add a FEam-Version Tenl Edfldr/AiteniMer 
(RequLrei Levels El and or SlQO Menwry).... 
599.95 plus ^2 )>ii 



$tart«r 6" DEik Syitem * Includet Level A, B 
llQ'ppy disk; CdnEioller, one COC i" disk-drive, iwo- 
drive cable, Iwo SlOO cannectart; jusi add yeur ewn 
power suppbei. cabiiiels anil hBrdwBre...O (Heg, 
SIOSS.E^O} SPECIAL S999,9S pLui 513 p&i...D IZi 
SUrlcT System. S1045.95 ptui S13 p&ii. P 4l|; 
Sltrtet Syslem 51D95.95 ptuj S13 p&i. G 54i( 
Slarter Sysiem. $1145.95 plus $13 p&i 
Add to my al ibove Exjitorer sleel cabinel. AP-1 
live imp. power supply. Levet C with two SlOO con- 
nectors, disk drive ciljtnei and power supply, Iwo 
lub'D connacEtrt lor connecting yaur printer and 
lermintL.tntg. $225..95] SPECIAL S199.95 plus 
SiSpftl. 
D Camplvte MK System. Wired & TesEed... 

51650.00 piui S2Sp&< 

Sli^QflQAaDS 

JAWS MEHORT BOARD. Feeliiret the MTCL 
B202 lor inviiiblf rtlresh. Diugned to )te used wllti 
8080. 6065 ind Z80 CPU's. Worti in an wel dc 
iigne<l $-lQQ conipulcrs, 10 d«y refund (sr ejtctiinge 
wirtd unH lor a KJl) on wked units. 
a 1611 Kn 149.95" a ISKwtrexl 179,95* 

O 32K Kil 199.95* D 32K wired 239 95- 

□ 46K Kil 249.95' P 4eK wtred 299.95* 

P 54lt m\ 299,95' □ 64K wired 359.95* 

'Add S2.00p&ito Jllabovt. 
4 PRIVI •" FLOPPY COMTROILER BOARD 
G Single denilly (singk or doubk lidedt coiglroUer 
using Ehe WD 1771. Includes Ewo serial ports. Plui^s 
inloiny S-1D0 compuEvr, 

tK vn iPROM lOARD, O tddressable en 
6K pi)K beundiiMi camplila with sackels 69.95 
4- 2.00 pAi. 

S-104 iLlCTRiC MOUTH. BivB your computer ihe 
power ot s>e<efi. Uses Hilienil'i OtGETALKER 
G with 143 words 93.9S r 2.00 p&i. D second 
word set 39.95 - 1.00 p&i. Board kccepu up lo 
4 wdrd sets or your own cuilem word rem chipi^ 



Uie 90 preprogrammed wordi or generaEe your own 
words irsing phonems. Perfect for any projecl 1h<E 
needs ipcech or lor speech developmtnE system. 
Donned] lo any RS 232 serial or 8 btE parrallel narl 
OT can be uted In i stand alone mode, a Spe^k- 
eisy jburd only) 159.95 - 3.00 pAi. D Cabmtl 
a^ power trantlormer 25.00 ■.■ 2.DDp>&i. 
TRS M ELCCTRIC MOUTH. Pluijs Inlo IJie expan- 
sion iJoi on Ihe TRS 80 models 1 or 3 lipccily type) 
□ wilh 143 word arl 11995 -h 3.00 pA I. In elude i 
separate power supply. P secdnd word set 39.95 
+ IQDji&i. same ipeti 11 S'idO model. 
APPLE EtECTRiC MOUTH. Same as aEHSve ex 
cepl Ihis board plugs mEo any of llie Apple expjin' 
lion sbQl] P with 143 wontsel 99.95 * 3. DO p4L 
O second word set 39.95 ^ 1.00 p^L Accepts 3 
ward seEs or cuitom vwi ROMs. 

ftgMrHAL$l VIOiO 



1reth...ttlmkmf| block cur]Dr...2k an-board RAM... 
ASCEi encoded keytioard; SB keys. 128 clharaclerr. 
4k on-board BOM...complele with power lupply 
k cabin el. 

a SMARTERH VIDEO BOARD: 199.95 i^ 300 p&i 
□ ZENITH VIDEO MONITOR (fpreen phoipTior): 149.95 
r G.DD pi^ O RF MOOULATOR (kil Dnly'f: 8.95 ^ 
I.QO p^i P 3-H. cable with DB 2S connaclort: 
14.95 + 200 pai 



_HARPPIS>E_ 





FASTlRM M O 199.95 

+ 3.00 pAi. OnsfiLav lor 

nval: 64 or 32 chir/lt 

lnBS...96 ASCI characEert 

(u/1 cait). .6 bind ratei, 

150 to 19,200..Jlne oul 

put: RS 232-C or 20 m« 

loop. ..video output: 1V Pi? 

...cutier modes: home 

& clfir screen, erase lo end oJ l»nr erate eunor 

line, curior up and down. luEo carnige reiurn/kne 

leed Bt ends oE Une and auto scroHing... reverie video 

...blinking cursor... partly: gtl. even, or odd.. .stop 

bits: 1, 1.5, Z...ditB bits per characler:SH6H 7 &r 6... 

printer eulpul: prinli all jncoming ^Bti...1)i on'-board 

RAM...2lt onboard ROM... complete with power sup^ 

piy, catMneE A 56-Vev ASCI encoiEed keyboard. 

D OpbdnH graphics mcKte: includes 34 Sreek A 

mith plus 30 ijMCtaE griphbc characltri: 19.95 

prepaid. 

G PAMIRM VIDEO BOARD; 99.95 + 3.DD pti. 
5MARTEHM M G 2^9.95^300 p^L Display 
lormat: spicily either 80 by 24 or 40 by 16 ..128 
ASCI characters [u&l case),. .8 baud ratet: 110 to 
19,200. imc oulpul: RS232/C or 20 ma currenl 
loap... video oulpul: IV P/P,..edl1lng features: 
inienJdelele knen InsetUdelete character, iw- 
waidjiback lab. .kne or pagei Erans(niL..page prini 
funclnn...curior posiliemng: up. down, righl, left, 
plui abioluie cursor positioning WJIA read back... 
visual attributes: undeitine, bhnk. reverse videa, hall 
IntensHy h Hank... graphics: 12,000 pixeE reiokiHon 
block plus line g raphes... cn-screfrh parity indlcatot... 
partly: oH. even or pdd.slop bits: 110 baud 2, aH 
others 1...prtn1er output.. .60 or 50 Hi vertical re- 



Add up Ee lour 6 or 12 megabyte hard disks lo v«iir 
S^lOO system. AulDmallcaMy instiHs UselT Eo any 
slanderd CPM 22 BIOS □ 6 metabytes 2495.00 4^ 
15.00 ?ki O 12 megabytes 2995.00 -i- 15.00 pll. 
D Disk to las] your system compdlihiiiiy 5,0D. 

lOFTWARt ~~ 

We art diitribulors for an Syslerns Plut & Mlcr7 
pro loHwarc. C^ill for prices. D OPrM 2.2 150,00. 
G Mtcroien diik basic 325.00. □ Special Rutinen 
Pac mcludcs CP^M, SASIC. GL, AR, AP « Payrofi 
699.95{sivt52S.00L 



CLIP AND Mail entire ad 

'p*i sitind's (or "posrdge S linju ranee." for 

Canad'i'ar^ ardtn. cfoubJe this omauni, 

CPyM i% Q j-eg. frod*mark of Dig\ftii Unearth 

TO ORDER Call Tall Free 

tOO-243.7428 

Ta ard*f from Cofi»»ctlcut <w for t*cKnlcal 
Btftlstanc* epil jMl) ]54'«l75. Conn. 

refldents vdd Balei tan. 
G VISA Q MASTERCARD (Bgnk >J^ - _ 1 

Acct. ^J" ^_^^ 

Exp. Dote ■ 



SEND ME THE ITEMS CHECKED IM AD 



Signature., 



Prirtt Namfl. 

Address .^ 

City^ 



Si{3ie_ 
2-P_ 



IS\ 



NETRONICSR&DLTD. 
333 Litchfietd Road, 
New Milford. CT ObTTb 



CIRCLE 37 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



III 



ta 

s 

55 



WIDE VARIABLE 

VOLTAGE RANGE 

0-1 50 VAC 



cofsmwuous 





K 



ilMTERMITTENT 



HIGH CURRENT 
HANDLING CAPACITY 
{1653:2A continuous] 



ISOLATED 
OUTPUT VOLTAGE 



BUILT-IN LEAKAGE 
TESTER FOR OSH A, UL. 
CSA TESTS (1 655 only) 




SOLDERING [RON 
TEMPERATURE 
CONTROL TO lOOW 



New! Isolated- variable AC 
power supplies that do it all- 
isolate, regulate, evaluate. 



if'f^.r.'^',^""'" 




In stock at your local distributor or call toll-free 

1 800 621-4627 [m Illinois 1-312-889-9087] 
for more information. 



*■= '='C»A/B=« 




MODEL 1655 ^350 
laoIated-Varlablc AC Power Supply 
with leakage tester 



MODEL 1653 |165 

Compact Isolated variable 
AC Supply. 



6460 West Cortiand Street ■ Chicago, Illinois 60635 > 312/663-9087 

International Sales. 6460 W. Cortland St.. Ctiicago, IL 60635 

• Canadian Sales. Atlas Electronics, Ontario 

South and Cenlral American Saies. Empire Exportefs. Piainview. NY 11803 



^^in^M T- *i\ i^ti 



ALARM CLOCK 

Build a talking alarm dock and you'll never have to tell time again— the clock will do it for you. 



LEE GLIN5KI 

here's a low -cost electronic 
alarm clock that really tells time^ — it 
talks. The time announcement, 
made in a pleasant-sounding female 
voice, sounds like this: "Good 
morning. The time is six fifteen 
AM." The voice is extremely life- 
like (and very feminine). The time 
can be announced either auto- 
matically or on demand by pressing 
a switch. In addition, the clock con- 
tains a 24-hour alarm. The alarm is 
not just an ordinary buzzer — it's an 
actual voice that tells you that it's 
"time to get up." Another of the 
clock's features is a power-failure 
alarm. You'll know you have to re- 
set the clock when it says: ' 'Power 
failed. Set the time." 

The entire microprocessor- 
controlled device uses fewer than a 
dozen IC's, all of them standard 
parts. The clock's voice is produced 
by a speech-processor IC that uses 
speech data derived from human 
speech that has been digitized and 
compressed; that's the secret of its 
excellent sound. 



(f 



.A 




L 



I. 



\1. 



\! 



1.1 




II 



Tr 1 



■Wl 




« 



Human speech 

Before describing electronic speech- 
synthesis, it is lirst necessary to have an 
understanding of how human speech is 
generated. The voice-producing mech- 
anism in human beings consists es- 
sentially of I wo pans- — the sound source 
and the vocal tract. The speech process 
starts with air being pushed out from the 
lungs. The resulting air stream stimulates 
the vocal cords, and causes sounds to be 
produced. Those are called voiced 
sounds, examples of which are vowels 
like "U" and "A." If the vocal cords are 
held open so they don't vibrate, the sound 
produced will be unvoiced, like the con- 
sonants "S" and "F. '■ 

The basic sounds enter the vocal 
tract — made up of the mouth, nasal pas- 
sages, and other resonant cavities inside 
the head, throat, and chest — where they 
are shaped into speech. Changing the 
shape characteristics of the. vocal tract 
produces different sounds. 

Speech-synthesis theory 

The voice of the talking clock is gener- 
ated electronically by a speech-synthesis 
IC, the Texas Instruments TMS5220. that 
simulates the human voice-producing 
organs described above. The speech- 
generation technique used is called linear 
predictive coding. 




DIA 

CDNVERTEfi 



AUDIO 
■ OUTPUT 



FIG. 1— VOICE-SYNTHESIS PROCESSOR IC contains all ttie elements necessary to reconstitute 
speech from compressed data stored in ROM. 



Linear predictive coding, or LPC. uses 
a mathematical technique to model (sim- 
ulate) the functions of the human vocal 
tract. Coherent speech is produced by 
stringing together many short speech- 
elements. Linear predictive coding de- 
termines how each of those elements is 



generated. Each speech element is gener- 
ated by mathematical calculations, and a 
formula generates each new element, 
based on the previous ones plus some new 
data. Thus the term predictive coding — 
each new speech element is partially pre- 
dicted from the previous ones. 



< 

cc 

58 



tillCROPRQCESSOH 
WAIT 




SWITCH REAQ 



^MOOE 

^O AURM 

"o SET MIMUTES 
O SET HOURS 
O SPEAK TIME 



FIG. 2— SPEECH DATA IS STORED in two IC's: IC7 contains "time-telling" messages: IC4 tiotds 
messages for alarm and other functions. 



^ 



RN1 tSV 



laoK 



ADDRESS BUS 



■ I * 

ICB IC? 

iQ 71003 



FIQ, 3 — BOLD LINES in schematic of talking clock represent multiple data and address tines. 
a £861 AVW 




w 
o 

z 
o 

CE 

H 
Q 
UJ 

_I 
UJ 

Q 

Q 

60 



The synthesizer simulates the human 
voice source and the vocal tract. As 
shown in Fig. 1 , the voice is simulated by 
a sound generator, and the vocal tract is 
simulated by a digital filter. That digital 
filter is the mathematical model ihat per- 
forms the calculations to generate speech. 
Both the sound generator and the digital 
filter change their characteristics con- 
tinuously as speech is produced. 

There are two sound generators: a 
variable- frequency generator to simulate 
voiced sounds from the vocal cords, and a 
noise generator to simulate unvoiced 
noise-like speech sounds. 

The digital filter shapes the signals 
from the sound generator to produce 
small time-samples of speech. Its charac- 
teristics can be altered to produce differ- 
ent sounds. 

Each word produced by the synthesizer 
consists of many time-samples in se- 
quence. During voice generation, one of 
the sound sources is selected, and the 
values of its pilch and loudness set. The 
sound source is then fed to the digital 
filter. The parameters of the filter are then 
programmed to shape the sound source 
into the desired speech pattern. The filter 
generates each speech sample from a 
calculated sum of the previous 10 sam- 
ples. That is done 10 minimize the amount 
of dala required to generate each new 
sample, and is ihe main characteristic of 
linear predictive coding. 

The information that determines the 
characteristics of each sample is the digi- 
tal speech data. That data is a description 
of certain parameters of the original 
spoken words. It contains parameters to 
describe the voice frequency, strength, 
and the filter characteristics required to 
create the synthetic speech. During 
speech generation the required data is fed 
to the speech synthesizer to control its 
operation. 

A collection of speech dala for a num- 
ber of words makes up a speech syn- 
thesizer's vocabulary. To generate a 
vocabulary for the .speech synthesizer, 
the words are first spoken and recorded on 
a high-quality master tape. Each word 
from the tape is sampled and digitized at 
an 8-kHz rate, and the resulting data is 
then fed to a computer for analysis. That's 
done to compress the data so that a mini- 
mum of memory is needed lo store it. 
Typically, the data will be compressed by 
a factor of 100 or more. 

Computer programs analyze the data 
using a mathematical model of the human 
speech-producing '"mechanism," The 
computer extracts parameters from the 
data that describe the speech in terms of 
vocal -tract qualities, pitch, and energy 
level as a function of time. Once those 
values have been extracted, other compu- 
ter programs further analyze and com- 
press the data. That will produce speech 
data that can be used by the synthesizer 
for voice generation. 
The compressed speech-data is coded 



in a way that the voice synthesizer can 
read and use effectively, and is stored in a 
ROM (/fead Only Memory). The voice 
synthesizer reads the data contained by 
the ROM. performs the mathematical cal- 
culations to simulate the vocal tract, and 
produces synthetic speech. 

Voice synthesizers 

The voice synthesizer IC used by the 
talking clock is manufactured by Texas 
Instruments. It's their TMS5220 voice- 
synthesis processor (VSP). and contains 
all the circuiti-y necessary to interface 
with a microprocessor and to generate 
speech. The VSP (refer to Fig. 1) consists 
of three major sections: the speech syn- 
thesizer itself, the microprocessor in- 
terface, and the speech-memory in- 
terface. 

The speech-synthesizer section of the 
VSP uses the LPC method described ear- 
lier. 

The TMS5220 uses a digital filter to 
simulate the action of the human vocal 
tract. The filter takes highly compressed 
LPC speech data from the speech memory 
ROM and processes it. Its output consists 
of another form of digital data, which is 
no longer compressed. The data — now in 
an expanded format — is a direct digital 
representation of the original speech 
waveform and is fed to an 8-bit digital-to- 
analog (D/A) converter, which outputs an 
analog voltage reproducing the original 
audio waveform. The voltage is then fil- 
tered to eliminate digitizing noise, and 
fed to an amplifier and speaker. 

As explained previously, the speech 
synthesizer needs compressed digital 
speech-data to generate speech. The 
TMS5220 was designed to accept speech 
data from one of two sources: from a 
dedicated speech memory, or directly 
from a microprocessor. 'The dedicated 
memory consists of .specially designed 
ROM's. Texas Instruinents has .several 
voice ROM's, with different vocabula- 
ries, on the market. Industrial, avionics, 
military, and clock vocabularies are cur- 
rently available. The voice ROM's are 
memories either 32K bits or 128K biCs in 
size, depending on the vocabulary size. 

The ROM used (a VM71003) has a 
capacity of 32K-bits (in a 1 6-pin package) 
and contains data for 34 words (a 128K 
ROM stores over 200 words). It contains 
words for all the numbers needed to an- 
nounce the time, as well as words for 
other clock-related phrases like "the time 
is," "AM." "good morning." etc. 

In addition, the clock also uses other 
phrases, such as "power fail" and "set 
the time."" Those phrases are not stored in 
the clock-vocabulary ROM; they are 
stored in an EPROM (Erasable Pro- 
grammable J? OM) that also stores the pro- 
gram that runs the clock , That speech data 
is read from the PROM by the micropro- 
ces.sor and fed to the VSP through its 
microprocessor interface. 

The voice ROM is connected to the 




PARTS LIST 



All resistors </« watt, 5% unless other-1 

wise noted 
R1, R11— 10.000 ohms 
R2— 330 ohms 
R3— 620 ohms 

R4. R8, R9, R12— 1000 ohms 
R5— 170 ohms 

R&— 180,000 ohms 

R7— 100,000 ohms, PC-mount trirhme 

potentiometer 
RIO— 100,000 ohms 
H13, HI 4— 8 X IK SIP (Single /rt-lint 

Package) resistor pack 

Capacitors 

CI— 330 nF, 1 volts, electrolytic or tart 

talum 
C2— 0.001 (iF, ceramic disc 
C3, C1 1 , C12— 2.2 (iF, 10 volis, electro 

lytic or tantalum 
C4— 0.05 M-F, ceramic disc 
05, C7. C13-C15— 0.1 (iF, ceramic disi 
C6— 0.01 fj-F, ceramic disc 
C8, CIO— 100 M.F, 16 volts, electrolytic 
C9— 480 jiF, 16 volts, electrolytic 



Semiconductors 

IC1 — Z80 microprocessor 

IC2. IC3— 2114 IK X 4 RAM 

IC4— 2516or2716 2K x 8 EPROM, pn 

programmed 
fC5— 74LS245 octal bus transceiver 
106- TMS5220 voice-synthesis pro;^ 

cessor 
IC7— VM71003 clock-vocabulary ROM 
IC8 — 74LS14 hex inverting Schmitt trig- 
ger 
109— 74LS139 dual 2/4 decoder 
tC1C^74LS367 hex Tri-State bus drivel 
IC11— LM386 audio amplifier 
1012—7805 5-volt positive regulator 
101 3 — 7905 5-voIt negative regulator 
D1-D3— m4001 
T1— 9 VAC, 600 mA. wall-plug tranS' 

former 
S1-S3— SPST slide or toggle switch 
S4-S6— SPST N.O. pushbutton switch 



Miscellaneous: PC board, speaker, IC 
sockets, heat sink for t 5-volt regulator, 
enclosure, wire, solder, etc. 



I 



4 



The foil owing are available from EL EX 
OR, PC Box 246, Morris Plains, NJ 
07950: double-sided plated-through 
PC board. Si 2.50; IC4. S7.50; 106 and 
107, S25.00; kit of all parts (less enclo- 
sure) S69.50. Please add S2,50 for post- 
age and handling as well as applicable 
state and local sales tax(es). 



voice synthesis processor through a 
memory-interface bus. That bus consists 
of four address lines and two control 
lines. The voice ROM is specially de- 
signed to work with the TMS5220 
through it. When the VSP reads data from 
the ROM. it first sends an address to the 
memory IC, and then begins reading the 
data one-bit-at-a-time in a serial fashion. 
It generates speech as the data is read. 
During speech generation the data rate is 
approximately 1200 bits per second. 

tontimii'd tm paiie 106 



D 



BURGLAR ALARM 
FOR YOUR CAR 

If you've been wanting to protect your car and its contents 
with an alarm system but have been put off by the high cost 
of some of those systems, here s a project that you m ay find 
' of interest. - ^ 



ABOVE ALL ELSE, A GOOD Al ARM SYSTEM 

should offer adequate protection at an 
affordable cost. The project we'll be pre- 
senting here meets both those criteria. 
First of all, it monitors all possible entry 
points (doors, hood, etc.); a motion de- 
tector can even be added if desired. A 
relatively simple, compact timing system 
provides for an approximate 13-second 
delay upon opening the door, allowing 
you plenty of time to enter the car and 
disarm the system before the alarm 
sounds; the alarm sounds instantly when 
the hood is opened. 

As far as cost goes, even if you use 
brand-new parts, you should be able to 
build the unit for about S25.00. excluding 
the siren. -A good siren — one that's sure to 
be heard and noticed — should run you 
about another S20.00. if you compare 
that to some similar systems on the mar- 
ket the cost is quite reasonable, and you 
can reduce it a bit more if you have a 
reasonably well-stocked junkbox. 

About the circuit 

The schematic diagram forthecircuit is 
shown in Fig. I . Except for the siren, it 
requires 5 volts DC for operation. Since 



EDWARD W. LOXTERKAMP 



12 volts is available from the car battery, 
getting that voltage is no problem if a 
voltage regulator is used. That's taken 
care of by IC6. a 7805 5- volt regulator. If 
that IC is properly heat sinked — and be- 
cause of the power that the device must 
dissipate, it has to be — it can handle one 
amp. 

You can use a standard TO-220 heat 
sink, but a better solution is to take a piece 
of aluminum measuring 'A x I X 'A 
inches and bend it 90°. The result is a less 
expensive heat sink, but more important, 
one that takes up less space. And since 
we're trying to make the circuit as com- 
pact as possible, every little bit helps. 

Returning to 1C6. its output will be 
5-volts DC as long as the input is main- 
tained above 7 volts. Capacitors CI and 
C2 are used to filter the IC's output, and 
for stability. Those capacitors are tanta- 
lum types and must not be substituted for. 
The regulator's output is u.sed to power all 
the circuit except the siren. 

As for the siren, one side is connected 
directly to -i- 12 volts (the car battery). 



The other side is connected through Q2 , a 
TIF 1 20 Darlington transistor, to ground. 
When 0.6 volt is applied to the base of 
Q2. it conducts, turning on the siren. 
Now let's turn to the interesting pan of the 
circuit — how we get the siren to turn on 
only when we want it to. ..and when the 
thief does not. 

Hood alarm 

You'll want the alarm to turn on as 
soon as the hood is lifted in case someone 
tries to tinker with your engine or battery. 
That's why the hood sensor should trigger 
the alarm without any delay. 

The sensor in the hood. SI, is a 
normally-closed switch that is open when 
the hood is closed. When that switch is 
open, the base of Q 1 is pulled up causing 
pin 8 of IC 1 -a to be pulled high. That IC is 
half of a 556, a dual negative-edge- 
triggered monostable timer. Opening the 
hood will release the switch, thus closing 
it. That, in turn, will cause Ql to conduct, 
and pull pin 8 low. That high-io-low tran- 
sition triggers the timer and pin 9. its 
output pin. goes high. When that hap- 
pens, Q2 conducts and the siren sounds. 
Once triggered, just closing the hood 



> 

■< 

CO 
00 
CO 

61 




FIG. 1— SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM of the car alarm. This circuit otters reasonable protection at an 
aftordable cost. 



en 
O 

o 

CE 

o 



o 

Q 

< 

tr 
62 



again will not turn the siren off. Switch 
S2. the muster arm/disarm switch must 
also be thiown. If it is not. the sifen will 
sound for a period set by the values of R4 
and C3 — about 52 seconds with the val- 
ues shown in the schematic — before it 
turns off and the system is rearmed. 
(Note, however, thai component-to- 
coinponent variances can cause the alarm 
on-time to vary greatly from your calcu- 
lated value. That on-time for this IC can 
be fmmd from the formula: I = 1 .IRC.) 
Diodes Dl and D2 are there simply to 
isolate the two timer-circuits from each 
other — Dl keeps IC4-b from outputting 
into ICl-a while D2 keeps ICI-a from 
outputting into IC4-b. We'll discuss the 
other tinier circuit in a moment. 

An LED. LEDl, is connected to the 
reset pin (pin 4) of the timer and is off 
when the circuit is armed. When S2 is 
closed, the LED is forward biased and 
lights. Since closing the switch disarms 
the system, if the LED is lit the system is 
("/(.vanned , 



The circuitry for the other sensors diff- 
ers in that it docs not turn the alarm on 
instantly. Lets look at it next. 

Door and hatchback sensors 

The basic difference between the hood- 
sensor circiiilry and the door- and 
hatchback-sensor circuitry is that the lat- 
ter features a time delay, That delay al- 
lows you time to enter the car and disarm 
the system before the alarm sounds, it 
also allows you time to leave the car after 
you've armed the system. 

When a door (or the rear hatch) is op- 
ened, one of S3-S7 closes, pulling pin 17 
of IC2-a low. which in tttm causes pin 1 
of iC3 to go low. Integrated circuit lC2-a 
is a quad Trt-Stato buffer/driver 
(74LS244). Normally, it passes an input 
signal to its output-unchanged, but when 
the input to pin 1^, is high the output 
becomes high impedance. Looking into 
pin 3. it appears as^f ijie device were not 
there at all. We'll see \\ov. that IC is used 
in this circuit a little later. 



Let's now look at IC.^. a 74LS 1 23 dual 
one-shot that it is negative-edge trig- 
gered. When its pin I goes low. the de- 
vice is triggered. Once that happens, 
there are only two ways to turn the alarin 
off — wait for the system to shut off anto- 
matically. or reset the entire system. 

The length of the pulse output by IC3 i.s 
determined hy the values of R9 and C5. 
When 1C3 goes low. the signal passes 
through lC2-b (assuming that pin 1 is 
low) and triggers IC4-b. When that hap- 
pens, pin 9 goes high and the alarm 
sounds. Pin 9 will remain high, and the 
siren will continue to sound, for a period 
of time determined by the values of RI3 
and C6. 

Pin I of IC2-b goes high, putting that 
device into its high-impedance state. 
shonly afier IC3 triggers the alarin. What 
happens is that, in addition to being fed to 
pin 1 of 1C3. the signal from lC2-a is 
picked off and fed to another 556. IC4-a. 
The values of CS and Rl I are chosen so 
that the duration of that !C's output pulse 



PARTS LIST 

All resistors Vt-watt, 5%, unless otherwise 

specified 
R1, R3, R6. R7. R12, R1 4^1700 ohms 
R2. R8— 1000 ohms 
R4. R11. R13— 1 megohm 
R5— 270 ohms 
R9— 680 ohms 
R10— 10.000 ohms 
R15— 330.000 ohms 
R16 — 560 ohms 

Capacitors 

CI— 0.47 jiF, 25 volts, tantalum (do not sub- 
stitute} 

C2— 0.1 M-F. 25 volts, tantalum (do not sub- 
stitute) 

C3. C5. C6, C8, CIO— 47 |j.F, 25 volts, 
electrolytic, radial leads 

04. C7, C9, C1 1— ,01 fiF, 25 volts, ceramic 
disc 

Semiconductors 

101 , IC4— 556 dual timer 

IC2— 74LS244 octal Tri-State noninverting 

driver 
103— 74LS123 retriggerable monostable 

multivibrator 
ICS— 74LS04 hex inverter 
IC6— 7804 S-volt regulator 
Q1— 2N3906 PNP transistor 
Q2~TIP 120 NPN Darlington pair 
D1. D2— 1N4148 switching diode 
LED1— red LED 

51. S3-S7— SPST momentary pushbutton, 
normally closed 

52, 89— SPST switch 

S8— SPST momentary pushbutton, nor- 
mally open 
SI — ^SRST key switch, normally open 

Miscellaneous: PC board, heat sink (see 
text), 10 sockets, Molex connectors, 
wire, solder, etc. 

is slightly longer than the pulse output by 
IC3. The pin-5 output oi"IC4-a is then fed 
to ICS. one section of a 74LS04 hex in- 
verter, and then to pin 1 of lC2-b. Thus, 
when the output from IC4-a cuts off, the 
signal at pin 1 of lC2-h goes from low to 
high. The purpose of all of that is to 
preveni any spurious or accidental 
triiiaering of the alarm. 

That takes care of the operation of the 
entry -del ay circuit, but not the exit delay. 
Lets go back to IC2-a again. When that 
device is in the high-impedance mode, it 
effectively disarms the sensors so they 
have no effect on the alarm. The trick is to 
disarm those sensors only long enough to 
allow you to get out of the car. Once that 
is done, the sensors should be rearmed so 
the circuit can fulfill its intended ptirpose. 

That function is handled by ICl-b. Us- 
ing S8 to bring pin 6 of that monostable 
timer (half of a 556) low triggers (he de- 
vice. Its liming cycle is determined by 
R15 and CIO. The timer's pin-5 output is 
applied to pin I of IC2-a. causing it to go 
into the high- impedance state and cutting 
the sensors off from the rest of the circuit. 
When that is done the sensors will not be 
able to turn on the alarm until the pulse 




-3-3/4 INCHES- 



M 



FIG. 2— HERE'S A FOIL PATfERt^ you can use if you wish to build the project on a PC board. Note, 
however, that almost any construction technique can be used. 



tZVDC t- 



TQ 
$2 




•INDICATES TACK.SOLOE 



OLOEREDJUMPER , H T I T, 



TO 
5337 



FIG. 3~PARTS-PLACEUENT DIAGRAM. Note that the foil-side jumpers are shown by dashsd lines. 



froin the 556 goes low again. When that 
happens lC2-a returns to normal and the 
system is rearmed. 

You can, if you wish, also set the alarm 
to sound instantly when any door or the 
rear hatch is opened. All that needs to be 
done is to throw S9. That switches R8. a 
1000-ohm resistor, in parallel with R9. 
decreasing the entry delay-time to a few 
milliseconds. The net effect is an in- 
stantly triesered alarm. 



Switch SIO is mounted outside the car 
so that you can disarm the system before 
entering when the system is in its instant 
alarm mode. That switch should be a key- 
type and/or mounted in a concealed loca- 
tion. If you don't want to include the 
instant-alarm-mode feature, the circuitry 
associated with it— S9. SIO. and R8— 
can be eliminated without otherwise 
affecting performance. Another alterna- 
tive would be to eliminate only S 10 and to 



> 

ID 
00 
CO 

63 




COMPLETED CAR ALARM, Note that tt)ls photo shows the author's prototype and includes several 
components not used In the version described In the article. 



to 
O 

o 

[E 

1- 
O 

m 

_i 
m 

6 

Q 

< 

a: 



adjusi ihe value of R8 to give an entry- 
delay just long enough for you to enter the 
car and disarm the alarm. 

Building and Installing the system 

Building ihe alarm shouldn't take more 



than an hour or two. There is very little 
that is critical about the circuit, and just 
about any construction technique can be 
used. If you wish to use a printed-circuit 
board, a foil pattern is .shown in Fig. 2; Ihe 
parts placement diagram is shown in Fig. 



SOME USEFUL MODIFICATIONS 



Whife this car alami system will do an 
excellent job of protecting your car. there 
is no reason for you to limit its design or 
applications to those discussed in this 
article. 

There are many modifications you can 
make to the system to make it perform 
better in your car. Or. somewhere other 
than in your car (your house, for ex- 
ample). We'll look at just a few of the many 
possible changes that you might care to 
mate. 

First off, for those of you who enjoy 
experimenting with microprocessors, why 
not replace S2 [the master arm disarm 
switch} with a "combination- lock" circuit 
that would require the entry of a number of 
digits in ttie correct sequence before the 
alarm could be disarmed? For added 
protection— whether or not you install a 
combination-lock circuit — you might want 
to consider tying the arm 'Disarm switch 1o 
the car's ignition switch. That would elimi- 
nate the possibility of a thief finding your 



switch and disarming the system easily. 

The sensors form another area of the 
alarm system that can be modified. 
Motion detectors — which would detect 
jacking or towing movements— can easily 
be added, as can sound sensors, which 
would 'listen ' for break-ins. Perhaps 
more reliable and effective, though, would 
be ultrasonic proximity-sensors. 

A third area of modifications can affect 
what the alarm does once a break-in 
occurs. 

Besides just sending out an audible 
alarm, why not also ground the vehicle's 
ignition coil so that it cannot be started? If 
that's not exotic enougti for you, how 
about a radio-transmitted silent alarm? 

To sum things up, you can see that the 
alarm system described here can serve 
as the basis of a larger, more complex 
system. There's really no limit to what 
features you can add. We encourage you 
to experiment, and we'd like to hear what 
you come up with 



? . Note that several jumpers are required 
if you use the foil pattern shown. Some of 
the jumpers mount on the component side 
of the board, but inost of them mount on 
the foil side: the foil -side jumpers are 
indicated by a dashed line in Fig. 3. 

Installing the system, pai'ticularly the 
sensors, in the car is a little moie difficult. 
The type of car determines how easy it is. 
One of the biggest problems we had was 
grounding the trigger inputs. When we 
ran the sensor lines through the doors and 
fire wall, in.sulation was pierced, causing 
continuous triggering. Care not to ground 
the sensor lines must be taken when run- 
ning them. A simple check with an ohm- 
meter before connecting the lines to the 
system will save a lot of headaches. 

It is very helpful to run all the lines 
(sensor, power, alarm, etc.) from the cir- 
cuit to a female Molex connector (any 
type of multiple-connection connector 
will do). All the connections inade in the 
car can be run to a male Molex connector. 
That simplifies hooking the system up, 
and helps prevent getting wires crossed. 

There you have it — a simple, low -cost 
and effective, car alarm you can build and 
install yourself, (You can also modify it 
yourself — see box copy to the left,) Now 
(here's no reason for you not to put your 
mind at ease by protecting your car and 
belonaines, R-E 



64 




Synthesizer IC*s 



The design of music synthesizers has been greatly simplified by 
new LSI IC's. We wilt discuss some of those tC's as well as the basics of synthesizer design. 



THOMAS HENRY 



WHILE HOME VIDEO. PERSONAL COMl'U [- 

ers and digital recording have recently 
been dominating the electronic-news 
scene, there has been a quiet revolution 
going on in the area of electronic music 
synthesizers. What started ou! as an in- 
significani field— with research being 
conducted mainly in university music 
studios-^has become a multi-raillion dol- 
lar business. In fact, business has been so 
good for the designers of electronic music 
equipment that some enlerprising compa- 
nies have even designed and produced 
large scale integration (LSI) devices dedi- 
cated solely to making music. 

This article will review some of the 
common modules found in an electronic 
music .<iynthesi?-er. In addition, we'll 
show sample circuits that illustrate the u.se 
of the new integrated circuits mentioned 
above. 

Early music synthesizers 

The early days of electronic music 
were characterized by expensive equip- 
ment that had very inaccurate and un- 
stable performance. The inaccuracy was 
caused by two things. First, until quite 
recently the musicians who used the 
equipment and the engineers who de- 
.signed it were literally in two .separate 
camps. The engineers knew ver\' little 
about music and the musicians knew even 
less about engineering. Communication 
between the two groups was difficult. 
Engineers had to guess about what 
parameters were important to the musi- 
cians, and equipment design was ba.sed 
on those guesses. Often their assumptions 
were unrealistic. As a result, musicians 
had 10 make the most of the available 
equipment, but often found their styles or 
techniques cramped by it. 



Most of the early composers of syn- 
thesized music came from academic 
backgrounds. Much of their early music 
was atonal — it didn't depend upon accu- 
rate re]iroduclion of the ordinary scale. 
Instead, the composers were interested in 
the '"lexiure" or "nuKxl" of the mu.sic. 
To the untrained listener such music 
.seems lo lack continuity and to he com- 
po.sed of unconnected sonic events. Since 
that style of music didn't depend upon 
accurately-tuned oscillators or twelvc- 
lone oriented keyboards, few advances 
were made in the design of reliable equip- 
ment. 

However, that all changed because 
sometime in the early I97()"s. pop music 
found ihe synthesizer and claimed it as its 
own, Pop music — being intrinsically ton- 
al and melodic— demanded better equip- 
ment. The pop musicians needed fairly 
inexpensive instruments that would stay 
in tune, antl thai would work the sante 
way from one night to the ne.tt. It also 
became important for the instruments to 
be inexpensive. That's becau.se, instead 
of institutions, it was individuals who 
wanted to purchase the synthesi/ers. 

Because of that new interest in syn- 
thesi/.ers for popular music, the !97fl's 
saw lots of activity in the area of design. 
Tubes and transistors were discarded in 
favor of the new linear integrated circuits 
that were starting to reach (he consumer at 
reasonable prices. And, as research pro- 
gressed, ntusicians siaried to learn more 
about synthesizer technology and de- 
manded new and better insirumenis. 
Likewise, the engineers, because of that 
new interaction , learned more about mus- 
ic and were able to make design decisions 
based upon real needs. 

The .situation remained like thai until 



quite recently. Professional-quality in- 
struments were available, hut their prices 
still placed them out of the reach of ex- 
perimenters, home recordists, and hob- 
byists. However, the new LSI integrated 
circuits not only bring the price down to 
an experimenter's level, but also make 
construction of high-quality synthesizers 
relatively easy. 

Music synthesizer fundamentals 

Every sound can be described by three 
parameters. Those HKfretiiiemy. timpli- 
tialc, and harnwuiv vonu'nt. Musicians 
have roughly synonymous terms: jincb, 
vnhitiw, and ihnhtT, However, it is impor- 
lani (o realize thai pitch, volume, and 
timbre are really the psychological per- 
ception of frequency, amplitude, and 
harmonic content. For example a 3-Hz 
signal obviously has frequency, but does 
il have pitch? It hasn't, because it ties 
below the audio range. Also, amplitude 
affects the ear's perception of pitch. A 
1-kHz tone played quietly has a different 
pitch than the same tone played at a high 
volume. 

Any basic synthesizer can control the 
three parameters. For instance, frequency 
is controlled by using a voltage- 
controlled oscillator (VCO). Amplitude 
is varied via a voltage-controlled ampli- 
fier (VCA). and harmonic content is 
altered by the voltage-controlled filter 
(VCF). 

Voltage-controlled oscillators 

There is no doubt that the VCO is the 
most critical module in a synthesizer. It is 
very important that the VCO — which 
controls the frequency of the synthesiz- 
er's outpui^ — be extremely stable and 
accurate, for the human ear is very sensi- 



live to frequency changes. Even non- 
musicians can detect detunings of, say, 
10cT««(l cent = 1/ 100 ofa semitone, or 
about a Q. 069c change). Compare that to 
the ear's sensitivity (or inscnsilivity) to 
amplitude changes — 1 dB is generally 
taken as the smallest change that the ear 
can detect, and that corresponds to a 
change of about 12%. 

Stability implies a number of things. 
First of all, the control-voltage input 
should follow some pre-assigned scale 
very accurately. Generally, a scale of 
one-volt-per-octave is used. Stability also 
implies low temperature-drift. That is an 
especially tricky problem, because to get 
a 1-volt-per-octave scale, an exponential 
converter is used. Most of those convert- 
ers use the exponential relationship of a 
transistor's base-emitter voltage to its 
collector current. However, as is well 
known, transistors are temperature sensi- 
tive. But, clever designers over the years 
have come up with a number of 
temperature-compensating schemes that 
work quite well in practice. The only 
drawback to such schemes is that they 
increase the parts count ofa VCO and add 
to its complexity. 

Reliable operation requires careful 
thought not only at the design level but 
also at the construction level. Printed- 
circuit boards must be carefully designed 
to minimize stray capacitances, tuning 
capacitors must have good temperature- 
coefficients, and so on. 

There arc other properties, besides 
stability, that a VCO should have. It 
should have a very wide output-range — 
say 10 Hz to 10 kHz, minimum. Also, a 
variety of waveforms (such as sine, 
triangle, square, and so on) should be 
available. A linear control-voltage input 
should be available for frequency- 
modulation effects (such as vibrato). 

Just several years ago a VCO in- 
corporating all of those features would 
have been quite expensive and may have 
used a dozen IC's. However, there are 
now several manufacturers offering LSI 
integrated circuits dedicated to the VCO 
function. The SSM 2030 made by Solid 
State Micro Technology is one. Another 
is the Curtis CEM3340. 

Figure 1 shows just how easy it is to 
build a VCO using one of the new IC's (in 
that circuit we use the CEM3340). Let's 
first look at the inputs available. The ex- 
ponential input, which is the one most 
commonly used, automatically does the 
exponential conversion for a one-volt- 
per-octave response (which can be 
trimmed very accurately by scale trim 
03 resistor. R5). 

y A linear input is also provided for 
O auxilliary control. It is used primarily for 
f frequency-modulation effects such as 
f^ vibrato. Also there are both hard-sync and 
QJ soft-sync inputs available; they allow 
i multiple oscillators to be phase locked, A 
Q non-linear feedback voltage is provided 
DC at pin 7 to correct high-frequency cnors 

66 




FIG. 1— THIS VCO has three output waveforms available — triangle, ramp, and a pulse trairi 



(which grow as the VCO is pushed toward 
its upper frequency-limit). 

There are three output waveforms 
available: a trianglewave, a ramp wave- 
form, and a pulse train. That pulse train 
can be modulated from 09c to 100% by 
applying a 0-5-volt control voltage to pin 
5, the PULSE- WIDTH MODULATION input. 
All outputs are buffered, eliminating the 
need for several op-amps. 

The convener is fully temperature 
compensated for both first and second 
order effects. That not only makes the 
designer's task easier but also reduces 
cost by eliminating the need for the usual 
thermistor required in VCO designs. 

As you can see from this example, the 
design of a VCO is considerably sim- 
plified by use of the CEM3340 or other 
such LSI device. The VCO is now es- 
sentially a single-lC circuit. That simplic- 
ity makes synthesizers using multiple 
VCO's practical both in terms of con- 
struction and expense. 

Voltage-controlled filters 

The voltage-controlled filter or VCF is 
used to alter the harmonic content of the 
signal from the VCO and is the next logic- 
al block in a synthesizer. A control 
voltage — using the same exponential 
scale as the VCO — varies the cutoff fre- 
quency of the filter. Because both the 
VCO and VCF use the same control- 
voltage scale, they can be made to track 
one another. That allows for an un- 
distorted waveshape or harmonic struc- 
ture over the entire frequency range. 



Generally an organ-type keyboard pro- 
vides the control voltage to both the VCF 
and the VCO, 

Voltage-controlled filters come in 
many varieties and are classified accord- 
ing to the basic type. The low-pass !ype 
has been very popular in the past. That is 
because most non -electronic instruments 
use some sort of low-pass filter mech- 
anism. (For example, a tmmpet or trom- 
bone player may use a "mute," which is 
nothing more than a low-pass filter,) 

Other types of filters have been used as 
well. Bandpass filters have been quite 
popular. They are characterized by the 
familiar "wah-wah" sound created when 
their center frequency is varied. Voltage- 
controlled high-pass filters are less com- 
mon, probably since their effect in a syn- 
thesizer system is less dramatic than 
either the low-pass or bandpass types. 
Finally the all -pass filter is becoming 
common for creating artificial Doppler- 
shift effects and phasing- orflanging-type 
effects, 

Eariy VCF designs used a large number 
of components. For example, a four- 
pole, low-pass design (almost the indus- 
try standard in filters for music) required 
anywhere from one- to two-dozen transis- 
tors. Two transistors were needed for 
each pole (for a total of eight); several 
more were required for input and output 
conditioning and still a few more were 
needed for the exponential converter. 
Even though transistors are relatively in- 
expensive, that type of discrete design 
can hardly be justified since the circuit 




EXPONENTIAL- R14 
VOLTAGE 54.aK 
IN •«- V^ 




-15V 



IC1 
SSMZMO 



AUDIO 



.001 



RS 
10K 



RE 
lOK 






R) 
lOK 



» V^ T II — VA — *A^' — Wi — ^^W^i — VA~i-V(V<i — -WV — *■ 



RB 
lOK 






is [14 [is 
C3 yk 



.001 ! 



09 
lOK 




12 FT 

C4 9R 

,DorJ_ 



RID 
10K 



R3 
20Qa 



R11 
10K 



10 






R4 
200n 



R12 
10K 



fl16 
100K 
6l , AUDIO 

OUT 



REGENERATION 
R17 

100K 




FIG. 2— NONE OF THE INTERNAL amplifiers of the SSM2040 are short-circuit proof, so none of the 
non-power-supply pins should contact the positive supply, the negative supply, or ground. 



board layout becomes quite extensive. 

The modem approach to VCF design is 
illustrated in Fig. 2. One IC, the SSM 
2040, does all of the fihering and voltage 
control, while a single op-amp provides 
output buflering. As shown, the IC has 
been configured as a four pole lou'-pass 
filter. However by rearranging the com- 
ponents it is just as easy to create band- 
pass, high-pass, and ali-pass types. 

The VCF is internally compen,sated for 
second-order temperature effects. 
However, because it is not compensated 
for first-order effects, it is necessary to 
use a thermistor in the circuit. The ther- 
mistor (THl) cancels the first-order 
effects and makes the VCF very stable. 

Most synthesizer VCO's have a lO-volt 
peak-to-peak outpiu. However, because 
the S.SM 2040 requires an input of I -volt 
peak-to-peak, input to it must be attenu- 
ated by a factor of ten. That is the purpose 
of R 15. The output of the VCF is ampli- 
fied by a factor of ten by the LF35 1 . 

Part of the output from that amplifier is 
fed back to the input (via R 17 and RI3) 
for regeneration . That peaks the response 
slightly at the filter's critical frequency, 
causing a more pronounced "wah" 
effect. Some of the newer VCF IC's (such 
as the Curtis CEM3320) include an on- 
chip gain cell that allows for voltage- 
controlled regeneration. 



Voltage-controlled amplifiers 

The voltage-controlled amplifier, or 
VGA. is the next synthesizer block that 
we will discuss. It is used to impose an 
amplitude envelope upon the audio signal 
created by the VCO, 

Early VCA's were composed of many 
discrete components, usually transistors 
configured as differential pairs. The 
differential-pair amplifier provides a 
fixed gain for a fixed control -current. If 
you change the control current, the gain 
changes as well. 

One major trouble with the differential- 
pair amplifier is that input signals have to 
be restricted to 10 mV or less to avoid the 
non-linear region of the amplifier. In- 
tolerable distortion will occur if the signal 
rises above that level. Obviously the 10- 
volt peak-to-peak audio signal from a typ- 
ical VCO has to be attenuated before 
reaching that type of VCA, and then 
boosted after it. That is why the signal-to- 
noise ratio of the early synthesizers was 
rather poor. 

Although the noise figure of that sort of 
VCA was adequate for live performance, 
the noise level became apparent when it 
came to recorded music. Pop musicians, 
who were starting to do a lot of recording, 
demanded something better. That 
".something better'" was the Gilbert pre- 
distortion input. The differential -pair 
amplifier actually has an exponential re- 
sponse. The Gilbert input stage pre- 
distorts the audio signal in a logarithmic 
fashion. The logarithm of the inptit isthen 
sent to the VCA where the exponential 




I 

-< 

FIG. 3— MANY OF THE itvlPUTS of the CEM3330 are at virtual ground. That allows for easy summirjg of » 
multiple inputs. Q 

67 



ATTACK 



DECAY 




ATTACK 



ATTACK DECAY 



OV 




RELEASE 



SUSTAIN 



/ 



sv 



OV 



+5V 



OV 





TRIGGER SIGNAL 
ImWIDE 



+5V 



OV 



GATE SIGNAL 



FIG. A — TIMING DIAGRAM for some Of the more commom envelope generators. Each waveform 
requires a trigger signal, gate signal, or both. 



response "unwarps" the effects of the 
Gilbert stage. That results in what appears 
to be a linear amplifier and makes passi- 
ble a marked increase in the signal-to- 
noise ratio. 

New lC"s dedicated to the VCA func- 
tion now incorporate the Gilbert input- 
stage. A number of companies make 
VCA chips now, and that is probably the 
result of an interest in VGA's for not only 
music but for other areas as well. 
Computer-controlled mixers in recording 
studios, telephone technology, radio- 
broadcasting equipment, and audio- 
frequency devices for u.se in ether areas 
are all in need of good voltage-controlled 
amplifiers. 

The most common VCA chips are the 
CA.rZSO by RCA. the LM 13600 by 
National Semiconductor, the SSM 2000, 



2010, and 2020 by Solid State Micro 
Technology, and the CEM3330 made by 
Curtis Electromusic. Some of those inte- 
grated circuits incorporate converters to 
give the VCA an exponential control- 
voltage input. 

Figure 3 shows an example of a VCA 
configured around the Curtis CEM3330. 
In its simplest fonn, the VCA has an 
audio input, a control- voltage input, and 
an audio output. 

The control-voltage input used in Fig. 
3 is pin 7, the linear input. Pin 6, which is 
shown grounded, is an exponential 
control-voltage input. However, most 
ADSR's (/Attack, Decay, Sustain, 
Release — modules that are usually used 
to control the VCA) have an exponential 
output. Therefore, pin 6 is almost never 
used. 



Envelope generators 

The last major building block of an 
electronic music synthesizer is the en- 
velope generator. Its purpose is to let you 
control the envelope of the synthesizer's 
output. The envelope is oneof thecharac- 
leri.stics that distinguishes the sound of 
the organ from that of the violin. The 
violin has a slow attack-time and its 
volume builds up to a steady state over a 
long time-period. The organ, on the other 
hand, has a very fast attack time — the 
sound is at full volume (almost at) the 
instant a key is struck and held. An en- 
velope generator should allow the user to 
create either effect in addition to count- 
less others. 

In general , the envelope generator pro- 
vides a non-periodic waveform that is 
used to modulate the amplitude of the 
audio signal (by means of the VCA). 
There are three basic types of envelope 
generators: AD (/It tack-Decay), AR 
(4ttack-ffelease), and the ADSR men- 
tioned earlier. 

The AD generator provides an attack- 
decay envelope (Fig. 4-a). It is usually 
fired by a trigger pulse like that shown in 
Fig. 4-d. The output of the generator is a 
control voltage with adjustable attack and 
decay times. It is most often used for 
percussive-type sounds. 

The AR envelope-generator provides 
an envelope like that shown in Fig. 4-b. It 
is fired by the presence of a gate signal 
like the one shown in Fig. 4-e, The gener- 
ator's control-voltage output rises to a 
steady .state and holds that state until the 
gate signal vanishes. The output control- 
signal then goes into the release portion of 
the curve. Because the AR generator is 
easy to design and build it has been pop- 
ular in inexpensive commercial syn- 
thesizers, 

coiuimied on page 104 



o 



O 

EC 



o 

UJ 



I 

o 




!^ FIG. 5— THIS ADSR ENVELOPE GENERATOR circuit provides you with complete control over the 
CC attack time, decay time, sustain level, and release lime. 



66 



M^^^Mq 



crri 



JOSEPH J. CARR 

l-OR DIGITAL CIRCUITS AND COMPUTLRS TO 

communicate with the real f analog) world, 
digital-to-analog converts are neces- 
sai7. Those converters, commonly avail- 
able as single IC's. allow data and in- 
formation to be transferred from one 
world to the other. 

Digital-to-analog converters (DAC's) 
produce an analog output that is pro- 
portional to the product of two inputs. 
One of those inputs is an n-bit digital 
word. The other input is either a reference 
current or a reference voltage. If that in- 
put is a reference cun-ent. then the output 
of the DAC can be expressed mathemati- 
cally by: 



In = If 



(^) 



(1) 



where A is the n-bit digital word. If the 
input is. instead, a reference voltage, then 
the DAC's output can be expressed by: 



(^) 



(2) 



With only a little imagination we can 
make the DAC perform any number of 
functions in which equations 1 and 2 play 
a part. The most obvious function, and 
that for which the DAC was invented, is 
to create a DC voltage or current level 
proportional to the binary number applied 
to the digital inputs. We could. For ex- 
ample, connect those digital inputs to a 
computer's output port. The DAC's an- 
alog output then will be proportional to 



the digital value output from the compu- 
ter. It will be in the form that we (in this 
analog word) will recognize, and it can be 
displayed on an oscilloscope or strip- 
chart recorder. 

Figure I shows a typical 8-bit current- 
output multiplying DAC, the DAC-08 
(Precision Monolith ics. Inc.. 1500 Space 
Park Dr. , Santa Clara. CA 95050). Being 
a current -output device, the operation of 
the DAC-08 is described by equation I . 
The device will produce an output current 
of (2 mA) X (A/256), where A is the 
digital word applied to the digital inputs. 
Amplifier 1C2 converts the current output 
of the DAC-08 to a voltage output. The 
amplifier output E is given by the expres- 
sion Iq X R3, .so with the component 
values shown E will range from to 5 
volts. 



Operational amplifier IC3 is con- 
figured as a lowpass filter, and is op- 
tional. The output of a DAC is a step 
waveform, with each step being equal to 
the DAC's LSB (Least .Significant Bit) 
voltage. The values .shown in Fig. I will 
produce a gain of 2, so the output will be 
10 volts for a 5- volt input. The cut-off 
frequency will be 1000 Hz, but circuit 
values can be changed to accommodate 
other frequencies. 

Waveform generator 

A DAC can be used to gejierate a saw- 
tooth output waveform by connecting its 
digital inputs to the output terminals of an 
ordinary binarv counter circuit (see Fig. 
2). A 7-bit CMOS 4024 counter can be 
used with an 8-bit DAC if the clock ter- 
minal is used as the LSB input. 



D/A Converter 




cations 



A fascinating device, there's more to the digitai-to-analog 
converter than meets the eye. Here's a closer lool< at the 
device and its applications. 




> 

< 




FIG. 1— A TYPICAL DIGITAL-TO- ANALOG CONVERTER, the DAC-08 used in this circuit is an 8-bit 
current-output multiplying device. 



generate a positive -going (as was done 
ubove) or negative-going sawtooth. The 
latter require.^ that wc count down from 
the counter's ma.KJmum. rather than up 
t'rom zero. 

A triangular waveform can al.so be 
generated u.sing an up-down counter. If 
we count up tVoni ()fl00(')M0 to i II 1 1 1 1 1 . 
and then reverse the order and count back 
down to 00000000 (instead of" merely 
resetting the counter), the output wave- 
form will be a triangle function. 

We actually can generate almost any 
function or waveform that we desire if a 
circuit such as the one shown in Fig. 3 is 
used- The bit pattern con'esponding to the 
points on the desired curve are stored in 
sequential addresses in a ROM. Those bit 
patterns will be applied sequentially to the 
digital inputs of the DAC, and cause the 
instantaneous value of the output voltage 
to change accordingly. 

The clock causes the counter to sweep 
through the waveform by incrementing 
the counter output.s from 00000000 to 




FIG. Z— A DAC CAN BE USED to generate a 
sawtooth waveform by connecting its input ter- 
minals to the outputs of a binary counter. 

Let's sec what happens. When the 
counter output is 00000000. the DAC 
output is zero. As the counter output in- 
crements, the DAC output is rising, until 
the counter reaches its maximum count 
fi.e. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ). At that point the DAC 
output is at its maximum. On the ne.xt 
clock pulse the counter will overrange. 
and reset to 00000000. so the DAC output 
drops back to zero. The output waveform 
that results is a sawtooth. 

By using an up-down counter, we can 



1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 , The frequency of the gener- 
ated waveform is controlled by varying 
the clock speed. That type of circuit, in- 
cidentally, is used in electronic music- 
generation. 

Digitally corttrolled attenuator 

Equations I and 2 show that a multiply- 
ing DAC produces an output proportional 
to two different factors; i.e. an analog 
reference and a digital word. Figure 4 
shows how to connect the DAC-08 to 
accommodate a bipolar reference such as 
an AC signal. Cuneni Iri.f is equal to 
Ep.|.p Rri£f- ^"d should be 2 niA under 
normal operating conditions. Further- 
more. En,-> must be greater than the peak 
AC value of the input signal Eiv. 

The compensation capacitor. Cc. be- 
tween the -V supply and pin 16 affects 
the frequency response of the DAC. The 
RC lime constant, fiRi-^ x C^. de- 
termines the maximum slew rate of the 
DAC-08. With component values of 
1000 ohms and 15 pF. the slew rate will 
be 4 mA/>S. 

That same circuit ean be used foron-off 
keying of a reference signal. That is done 
by tying all of the digital inputs together 
to form a single keying terminal. When 
the keying terminal is low, the AC output 
is cut off. but when it is brought high the 
AC reference is passed to the output at its 
full amplitude. 

Op-amp offset control 

A DAC ean be used to control the out- 
put offset of an operational amplifier by 
using a circuit such as the one shown in 
Fig, 5, The output voltage can be ex- 
pressed b> : 



■ EinRf 



-AEr 



256 



Rf\ 



We can. therefore, digitally control the 
output offset by varying the digital word 
A applied to the DAC, For current-output 




CO 

o 

z 
O 
ir 

t- 
o 



LU 

5 FIG. 3— ALMOST ANY WAVEFORfil can be 

§ generated using a OAC. The block diagram of an 

CL appropriate circuit is shown here. 

70 




FI^CTih^AoSbcan ACCOMMODATE a bipotaTreferenc^ignal! 
configured as shown. 




FIG. S — THIS CIRCUIT SHOWS how a DAC can t>e used to control the output offset of an operational 
amplifier. 



DAC's eliminate RI. 

Automatic zeroing circuits 

Many circuits have an offset that must 
be nulled before proper operation is possi- 
ble. Medical, scientific, and industrial in- 
struments, for example, use transducers 
to acquire data and convert it to an elec- 
trical signal. Unfortunately, almost all 
transducers have a certain offset voltage. 
That is. they will produce an output volt- 
age even when whatever it is they're sup- 
posed to measure (blood pressure, vibra- 
tion, etc. ) is not present. Consider arterial 
blood-pressure transducers used in 
medical electronics. Those instruments 
use Wheatstone-bridae transducers to 



sen.se the blood pressure. Theoretically, 
the output should be zero when the trans- 
ducer is open to atmosphere. But trans- 
ducer imperfections and hydrostatic pres- 
sure in the lines to ihe patient creates an 
offset in the amplifier output that must be 
nulled. Figure 6 shows a representative 
auto-zero circuit that will aiuomaiically 
null a circuit at the push of a button. 

When power is first applied, the 
power-on reset circuit will reset the DAC 
to 00000000. When the transducer is op- 
ened lo the atmosphere, a voltage will 
appear at the output (Eo). That voltage 
represents the sum of all of the offsets in 
the circuit preceding that stage. When the 
zero button is pressed, one-shot 1 fires a 




ONE-SHOT ? 



0NE.SH0T2 



-TL 



_r 



L. 



TIME- 
a 




FtG. 6 — A DAC CAN BE USEFUL in a circuit designed to null out any offsets in sensitive ineasuring 
equipment. Such a circuit is shown here. 



TtM£ 

FIG, 7— TIMING DIAGRAMS for the one-shots 
used In Fig. 6 are shown in a; the resulting out- 
put, Eq, is shown in b. 

brief pulse that ettsures that the counter 
and C)AC are reset to zero, while also 
triggering one-shot 2. (The timing di- 
agrams are shown in Fig. 7). The time 
period of one- shot 2 is very long relative 
10 the lime period of one-shot 1 (and 
might actually approach one second or 
more). When the output of one-shot 2 is 
high, clock pulses are gated into the coun- 
ter causing the counter and DAC to incre- 
ment. The comparator will have a high 
output as long as Eq is not zero. Voltage 
E, the DAC output, will rise in ramp-like 
fashion as the DAC digital inputs incre- 
ment (see Fig. 7). It is summed with input 
voltage —Eyy at the inverting input of the 
op-amp (that op-amp should be a low- or 
unity -gain device), so the output voltage. 
Eq, will drop. When Eq has dropped to 
zero, the oiuput of the comparator drops 
low. shutting off the flow of clock pulses 
to the counter. The digital inputs of the 
DAC. therefore, remain at the last count 
that occurred before the coinparaior out- 
put dropped low. Unless the transducer 
offset changes, the output voltage Eq will 
represent only the true value of the signal, 
less any offset. 

Makitig use of a multiplying DAC 

What is a multiplying DAC".' All 
DAC's arc multiplying circuits (sec equa- 
tions I and 2)1 they produce an output that 
is the product of an analog reference and a 
digital word applied to the digital inputs. 
But in manul'acturcrs' catalogues we note 
that only some DAC's are referred to as 
"'multiplying'" devices. The reason for 
that is that a multiplying DAC is com- 
monly detincd as a DAC that operates 
from an external analog reference, while 
one thai operates only from its own in- 
ternal reference is a non-multiplying 
DAC. 

A little cleverness counts for a lot in 
using a multiplying DAC, You can. for 
example, design circuits that perform 
arithmetic operations and produce an an- 



> 

-< 

05 
U 

71 




to 
o 

z 
o 
oc 

I- 
o 

UJ 

_I 
LU 

I 

o 

Q 
< 

72 



RG. 8— TWO DAC'S AND AN OP-AMP are used 
in a circuit that finds the analog sum of, or differ- 
ence between, two digital words. 



alog output. You can also calibrate sever- 
al DAC's to a single reference, thereby 
increasing the overall uccuracy of your 
measurcmcnls. 

Let's look at an example of an arithme- 
tic application oi' the multiplying DAC. 
one in which it is used in a circuit that 
produces the analog sum or difference 
between two digital words. That requires 
two DAC's and an operational amplifier 
as shown in Fig. 8. Apply one digital 
word to each DAC, Their respective out- 
put.s are fed to the input(s) of the op- 
erational amplifier. (If the sum of the two 
is required, then connect both DAC otit- 
ptils to the same op-amp input. But if the 
difference is required, connect the 
subtrahend — the number you wish to 
subtract — DAC output to the inverting 
input, and the minuend — the number 
from which it is subtracted — DAC output 
to the nonin verting input.) The gain' of the 
op-amp allows us to set the scaling factor 
(if needed), so that the op-amp output 
correctly represents the sum or difference 
between the two words. 

Figures 9 and 1 show two more ways 
that DAC's can be used. Figure 9 shows a 
four-qtiadrant S-bit by 8-bii digital multi- 
plier based on the DAC -08. Two of the 
devices. ICI and 1C2. are connected 
together to make an extended range cir- 
cuit, while 1C3 is used to supply the an- 
alog reference lor IC I and IC2. Since the 
digital word applied to 1C3 sets the analog 
reference-current applied to the other two 
DAC's. which are multiplying DAC's. 
the output will be proportional to the 
product of word A and word B. 

Figure 10 shows a pair of DAC-08 de- 
vices connected into a raliometric A/D 
converter circuit. That is the same basic 
circuit that is used in many .VD conven- 
ers (i.e. successive approximation or bin- 
ary ramp types), but with two DAC's 
instead of one. The resulting output vkord 
is proportional to the ratio of the two input 
voltages. V\ and V^-. 

Raliometric measurements are often 
performed by scientific, medical, and in- 
dustrial instruments because they are 
often more reliable than actttal value 
measurements. It seem.s that factors that 
create drift problems ot'ten affect two or 
more parameters, so they will cancel out 
if ratios are used. Take, for example 
transducer measurements (as previously 
discussed). If tlie transducer's excitation 




FIG. 9— THIS FOUR-QUADRANT 8-bit x 8-bit digital multiplier uses three DAC-08's. The drcuil's 
output will be proportional to the product of word A and word B. 




SK 



ICI 
DAC'OB 



I MSB 



LSS' 



- 5 



5K ^5, 



15 

r 



7|8l9 



91D 



1112 



ID 



1112 



iC2 
DACOS 




ifVOMETatC A D CONVERTER. Ratib'mel I ic lathei than direct measurements are Often 
made by scientific, medical, and Industrial instruments for greater accuracy. 



potential drifts, the resultant output- 
voltage change will be seen by the follow- 
ing amplifiers as a valid change in the 
signal. 

The circuitry has no way of knowing 
which changes are data and which are not. 
But we can often cancel that form of drift 
by using raliometric measurements. If we 
apply the excitation potential to one in- 
put, and the signal potential to the other, 
then the output potential will be the ratio 
of the two inputs. If the excitation drifts, 
then both the excitation potential and the 
signal potential will change by an equal 
amount. The result is that no output 
changes occur in the ratiometric signal. 
But if the signal changes are valid, then 
the excitation potential will remain con- 
stant as the signal potential changes. The 
result will be a change in the output of the 
ratiometric circuit. The output from a 
ratiometric circuit is called a ''normal- 
ized" output. R-E 




'The nu'ttniitg of life? Jusl secatuL. 



o 



MW^^ 



i_n" 



PASSIVE 

ANTENNA 
TUNER 





FOR VLF-LF 



One way to improve the performance of VLF-LF antennas is through the use of a passive antenna 
tuner. Here's the theory, and some ideas on how to use it. 



R.W. BURHANS 



Part 4 



PRiiVK)US ARTlC'l.liS IN 

ihis scries hiivc pre- 
scMcd \onK details ol' short active an- 
tennas for Ircquencics covering tiie range 
I roiii 1 kHz to 30 MH/. Passive ariteiiiia- 
t liners ibr random- iengtli wires are an- 
other approach lu the prahlem ot' good 
signal reception. Commercial models are 
available, but they are usLUilly designed 
lor the niedinm- and shortwave bands 
above 150 kH/.; only one system claims to 
be elTeetive all the way down to 10 kHz. 
Since the greatest reception problems 
arc encountered at low frequencies, let us 
discuss the design of selective antenna 
tuners coverim; tlie ramie ol' U) kHz to 
500 kHz. 

Antenna lead-in 

It is interesting to consider the idea ot" 
locating the antenna tuner at the receiver, 
with the antenna wire connected by a 
length of coaxial cable to the receiver and 
tuner as illustrated in Fig. 1 . One problem 



at low iVequencies is that the shunt cable- 
etipaeitance, Q, in parallel with the an- 
tenna eapticitance, C;,, reduces the sen- 
sitivity by the factor: C,/(C,-l-Q.-l-C,), 
By choosing a length of relatively high 
impedance, low-capacitance cable, it is 
possible to design a tuner that takes into 
account the cable capacitance as part of 
the tuner network, and that can operate 



with up to .50 feet (about 15 meters) of 
cable separating the antenna wire from 
the receiver and tuner. That antenna will 
be less effective than an active-antenna 
preampliller system for the same length 
of antenna wire, but there will be fewer 
problems of intermodulation distortion 
because of the high selectivity, and no 
active preamplifier is involved. The 




> 

< 

FIG. 1— IT IS iriflPORTAtJTtotake into account ffiecapacilifice, C,., added byt he coaxialcable between g 
the antenna and tuner. S 

73 





TABLE 1 


Frequency range 


Inductance 


(kHz) 




(mH) 


10-16 




150 


15-27 




68 


23-38 




33 


37-67 




10 


67-120 




3 


119-210 




1 


208-380 




0.3 


380-630 




0,1 



CO 

o 

z 

o 
cc 

H 

o 
m 

_i 

UJ 

Q 

D 
< 

CE 

74 



advantage of having the antenna tuner 
located at the receiver is obvious. The 
coiixial icad-in helps reduce local-noi.^e 
pickup since the antenna wire can be lo- 
cated away from power lines, home ap- 
pliances, and other noise sources. 

Design considerations 

To design such a tuner .system we must 
first measure or estimate the total mini- 
mum capacitance, including the antenna, 
cable, and minimum tuning capacitance, 
A relatively-high-vulue tuning capacitor 
is required, having a value several times 
greater than the total minimum capaci- 
tance. Wechosea3-gang variable capaci- 
tor, each section having a range of about 
12 to 440 pF. like those found in oider- 
style AM radios (commonly referred to as 
360-pF units). They are still available 
new at rather high prices, but similar de- 
vices cari often be found at surplus- 
electronics-parts stores. 

Taking all the components together, 
the total minimum capacitance is: 

Antenna capacitance 120 pF 

Cable capacitance 360 pF 

Minimum tuning capacitan ce 36 pF 
Total minimum capacitance 51 6 pF 

The total maximum capacitance (with the 
tuning capacitor fully meshed) is: 

Antenna capacitance 120 pF 

Cable capacitance 360 pF 

Maximum tuning capacitan ce 1320 pF 
Total maximum capacitance 1 800 pF 

Tuner circuit 

Now [hat we have estimated a capaci- 
tance range for the tuning circuit of 
516-1 800 pF. a set of inductors is needed 
that will resonate with that capacitance at 
the fre quencies w e're interested in. The 
ratio , 1800:5 1 6 gives us the tuning range 
for a given fixed inductor in the circuit — a 
range of about 1 ,86: 1 Tor each coil, A set 
of inductors that will provide the results 
we "re looking for over the range of 
10-500 kHz can be chosen from Table I . 
The indtictors are connected in series with 
the antenna and cable lead-in. along with 
a very-low-rcsistance toroidal coupling- 
transformer designed to match a 500-ohm 
load at the receiver as shown in Fig. 2. 
The inductors are selected .so that each 




FIG. 2 — THE VALUE OF INDUCTOR " L' can be determined from Table 2. In practice, severaflnductors 
would be present, only one of whicti would be switctied into ttie circuit at a given time. 









TABLE 2 






Mtdband frequency 


Loss 


Q 


Bandwidth Inductance Inductor part number 


(kHz) 


(db) 




(kHz) 


(mH) 




13,9 


-24 


47 


0.3 


150 


Mouser43LJ415 


20,1 


-17 


92 


0,22 


68 


Mouser 43LJ368 


30,1 


-15 


56 


0.54 


33 


Mouser 43LJ333 


52.7 


-10 


53 


1.0 


10 


Mouser 43LH310 


93.6 


-9 


36 


2.6 


3 


Mouser 43LH233 


168 


-8 


22 


7.7 


1 


Mouser 43LH210 


298 


-9 


12 


24. 


0.3 


Mouser 43LR334 


518 


-9 


12 


42. 


0,1 


Mouser 43LR104 



frequency range will overlap the next 
slightly; that means an inductance change 
of less than ( 1 ,86/ 1 )" between each set of 
coils selected for this example. 

The wideband-output coupling- 
transformer takes the place of an addition- 
al set of parallel inductors to match the 
receiver's input impedance. In addition to 
the capacitive-dividcr loss at the antenna 
input, the transformer in series with a 
high reactance coil adds an insertion loss 
at the low-frequency end. That is. in part, 
compensated for by a higher Q. That 
selectivity decreases at higher frequen- 
cies, but gain increases. When connected 
to the 500-ohm receiver input-terminals, 
the low-inipedance-inpui tap point of the 
output transformer looks like a 30-ohm 
load to all the coils. That is about the be.st 
that can be achieved because of the very- 
wide variation in reactance and L.'C ratio 
of the input network, but the overall per- 
formance is quite satisfactoi^y, consider- 
ing that we are using a single output- 
transformer to cover the range of 1 kHz 
to over 500 kHz. 

The coil aiTangement uses a multiple- 
position selector to switch frequency 
ranges and has a constant bandwidth- 
characteristic for each coil. That is. the Q 
for a given coil will be highest at the 
minimum capacitance-setting, decreas- 
ing by an amount equal to about the tun- 
ing ratio at maximum capacitance. The 



results obtained using low cost RF- 
choke-type inductors with the 120-pF an- 
tenna are shown in Table 2. The antenna 
used was a lO-meter-high, four- meter 
flat-top. 

Input-capacitance variations 

If you use an antenna wire orcable with 
more or less capacitance than the one we 
did, the inductance ratios will have to be 
computed for a different set of coils. The 
cable we used was surplus marked 
■■FT&R Corp. Type K 109." and meas- 
ured only 8 pF/ft. Thus, 45 feet of cable 
had a capacitance of 45 x 8 = 360 pF. 
For other high- impedance cable such as 
RG62. with a capacitance of 13.5 pF/ft.. 
360/13.5, or 27 feet, would be used with 
the same variable capacitor and coil-set. 
You may be able to find some high- 
impedance, low capacitance cable of the 
type used in automobile-radio in- 
stallations. Each different system will in- 
volve a session of L-C calculations to 
match inductances and capacitances to 
the frequency range desired. 

The following two formulas will help 
in those calculations: 



f 



10^ 



2^,m 



10" 



{ZTtif 



ttr 




TABLE 3 



Frequency 



10 kHz 



400 kHz 



Capacitive loss factor 
C«/(C„ + C, + C,) = C 

Ground loss factor 
estimate = K 

Measured network loss with 
antenna & cable capacitance = N 

Antenna-to-receiver Z loss-factor, 
direct, no cable 500/Xca = A 

Antenna sensitivity without 
tuner or cable = K + A 

Antenna sensitivity with 
tuner and cable =^ K + N 

Net improvement in 
sensitivity (K + N] - (K + A) 



-23d8 


-12dB 


-26dB 


-14dB 


-24dB 


-9dB 


-49dB 


-17dB 


-75CIB 


-31dB 


-50dB 


-23dB 


+ 25dB 


+edB 




FIG. 3— lt4TEHiOR OF THE AUTHOR'S prototype tuner. Note inductors mounted on rotary switch. 



where f is the frequency measured in kHz. 
L is the inductance measured in ^H (1000 
^H = ImH). and C is the capacitance in 
pF. 



Performance data 

Table 2 illustrates well the Q and mid- 
band loss of the tuning network with the 
antenna and cable connected: the figures 



were determined on the bench using a 
signal generator. Actual antenna perfor- 
mance will be somewhat worse than in- 
dicated by the loss factor because it will 
also be affected by the ground coupling K 
factor. (See Part I , in the February 1 983 
issue of Radio- Electronics.) In our tests, 
K varied from .05 (an additional - 26 dB) 
at 10 kHz to about 0,2 ( - 14 dB) at 400 
kHz, 

An estimate of overall efficiency made 
by comparing the wire antenna connected 
directly to the 500-oh:ii input of the re- 
ceiver with the same antenna connected 
through the coaxial cable and tuner to the 
receiver, is illustrated in Table 3. From 
that table you can see that there is an 
overall improvement of 25 dB at the bot- 
tom of the VLF band (10 kHz), which 
decreases to only 8 dB at the high end of 
the LF band (400 kHz). 

The high antenna-loss factors shown 



'PARTS LIST—PASSIVE TUNER 

C, — three-gang tuning capacitor, 12-440 
pF per gang (Allied 695-4200 or similar) 

T— quadrifilar toroidal transformer, 28 
turns ot four No. 30 insulated wire, 
twisted four-turns-per-inch on Amidon 
FT82-75 (or Similar) core 

L — RF-chock-type inductor(s) (see 
Tables 1 and 2) 

Miscellaneous: high-impedance low- 
capacitance coaxial cable, rotary 
switch, metal enclosure, connectors, 
■etc. 



i 



are typical of what happens when a ran- 
dom wire is connected directly to a 500- 
ohm receiver- input. The tuner provides 
an obvious improvement that is roughly 
proportional to the Q of the tuned circuit. 
In addition to increased sensitivity, the 
antenna tuner also provides high selectiv- 
ity with practically none of the preampli- 
fier or receiver IM problems noted with 
active antennas. On the other hand, 
active-antenna systems have better 
sensitivity. 

The antenna tuner's nan'ow bandwidth 
requires that it be peaked whenever you 
shift frequency. That's easy to do if you 
have an S-metei', or you can listen for an 
increase in the signal- or background- 
noise level from the receiver as you adjust 
the tuner. For experimenters who wish to 
vaiy that method of antenna tuning, there 
are many factors to consider. The an- 
tenna's Q is limited by both the coils used 
and the series resistance of the network. 
That means that, even with the very best 
of inductors, the series resistance of the 
high-impedance cable and the output 
transformer, as well as the ground resist- 
ance, will ultimately affect performance. 
At the higher frequency-ranges, a lower 
Q is inherent in the system because of the 
lower coil reactance compared to the re- 
sistance in the system . Another variable is 



> 

■< 

00 
CO 

75 



the lums ratio of the outp I transformer. 

One possible improvement that could 
be made alter inspecting the data in Tabic 
2 would be to sw iteh the tap on the output 
trans Ibrmcr for a 4: 1 ratio lor the liequen- 
cies below 50 kHz. where the coils' re- 
sistance and loss are much hijihcr. The 
16: 1 tap could be used for the coils for 50 
kHz to 500 kHz. where the loss is re- 
latively constant at 9- 10 dB. That change 
vvould result in a lower Q tor the larger 
inductors, but a net improvement in pow- 
er transformation to the receiver as sug- 
gested in the circuit shown in Figure 2. 

Figure ? shows the patis placement in 
the experimental version of the antenna 
tuner. The inductors aie motintcd radially 
around the switch, with the output- 
transformer toroid toward the rear of the 
housing near the receiver-output ter- 
minal. The prototype shown had an extra 
non-standard inductor at the lowest- 
frequencv switch position for reception 
below id kHz. 

Antenna-capacitance measurement 

Most experimenters own a ignal 
generator, oscilloscope, and frequency 
counter. They can be used to get a good 
estimate of the antenna's capacitance by 
following the method shown in Fig, 4. 
That is a simplified return-loss method 
where a small series-resistor takes the 
place of a 3-dB hybrid transformer. The 
resi.stor should have a value much lower 
than the reactance of the inductor iit the 
frequency at which the measurement is 
made. Resistors in the range of 50 to 100 
ohm.s, together with inductors having 
known values betweeji 5 and 10 niH. can 
be used for antenna-capacitance ineasure- 
ments over the range of 10-500 pF for 
frequencies between 50-500 kHz. It is a 
good idea to make a preliminary estimate 
of the antenna capacitance by using the 
approximation of 1 OpF/meier of antenna 
length for wire antennas, and to use that 
figure a.s a rough guide to values for use in 
the initial test. After estimating the an- 
tenna's capacitance, the resonant fre- 
quency can be checked by substituting a 
capacitor of about the same value as that 
calculated for the antenna. 

In our case, the flat-top antenna was 
terminated on a back porch, where it was 
easy to connect various pieces of test 
apparatus — and even a receiver- — directly 
to its base. Variations on the substitution 
method can be used to measure cable 
capacitance with known inductors, or for 
unknown inductors with known capaci- 
tors, or even for coil distributed-capacity. 
using difference methods with known 
« capacitors in parallel. 

Q Mutually-cotipled antennas 

H An interesting effect occurs when a 

uj tuned wire antenna is placed \'cry near a 

[Ij short wideband active-antenna whip. The 

O vertical active-antenna system is 

g mounted at ground level, directly un- 

cc deraeath the flat-top antenna at a distance 

76 




F1G.4— TEST SETUP FOR DETER Ml NINtj antenna capacitance. Oscilloscope Is used to observe sligM 
dip in response at resonant frequency of system as frequency of signal generator is slowly varied. 



of 5 to 10 meters (about I3-"10 feet). The 
Hat-top is connected to the Inner, but the 
output of the tuner is terminated with a 
resistor instead of the receiver. The 
active-antenna system is connected to the 
receiver as illustrated in Fig. ,^. You may 
find that the amplitude of received signals 
is increased by 20 dB or jnorc when the 
passive llat-top antenna tuner is tuned to 
resonance at the same frequency. That is 
an example of very-near-field mutual 
coupling. The active whip at ground level 
can be tuned for considerably inci eased 
sensitivity by placing it very near another 
tuned-antenna sy.stem. 

That phenomenon could possibly be 
used to make directive VLF-LF atTays 



antenna-effects due to things like drain 
pipes, gutters, power lines, telephone 
cables, trees, etc. Most of those can piob- 
ably be accounted for by mutual-coupling 
phenomena, but are difficult to estimate 
oreonipme because of the unknown field- 
boundary conditions at a given location, 

.As we have seen, a single series-tuned 
inductor can improve the efficiency of a 
short -wire antenna at the VLF-LF range 
b\ 20 dB or more compared to the v\'ire 
alone when connected to a typical 500- 
ohm receiver-input terminal. Local-noise 
pickup can be reduced by using a length 
of low-capacitance cable to connect the 
antenna to the receiveiVtuner. 

A dominating feature of pa.ssive VLF- 




FIG. 5— MU 
much as 20 dB. 



of antennas — one passive, one active— can Improve performance by 3S 



with very close spacings of 1/1000 
wavelength or less between several tuned 
antennas and the excited active probe. 
Such a system, though, would probably 
require good serie.s-inductors. and would 
be difficult to tune— the relative phase- 
change between antennas woidd be \'cry 
steep because of the high of the tuned 
circuits, 

VLF observers report many unusual 



LF short-wire antennas is their relatively 
high loss compared to the theoretical field 
available in space above the antenna. To 
offset that, though, an antenna tuner pro- 
vides a considerable reduction in in- 
terference, along with high selectivity 
and no intcrmodulation distortion at the 
receiver input. It also offers improved 
sensitivity, cotn pared to the antenna 
without a tuner. R-E 



D 




mmmt 



^m 



REWIND „ 
TRANSFORMERS 



DON A. MEADOR 



If you can 't find ttre rig fit transformer for your project at the rigtit price, there's an easy solution — 
rewind one! As this article shows, the job is not as difficult as you might think. 



ONE OF THE MOST IMPORT Af^ PARTS OF A 

power supply, whether ii be for a project 
or your bench, is ihe transformer. If 
you've had much building experience, 
however, you know thai getting the right 
transformer — one with appropriate volt- 
age and current ratings — can be difricull 
andyor expensive. That's doubly true if 
you need something other than a "stan- 
dard" voltage. 

Tlie easiest and most economical way 
to solve those problems is to rewind a 
readily available or inexpensive transfor- 
mer. This article focuses on two aspects 
of the task: specifications, and the general 
guidelines for rewinding transformers. 
Also, we'll look at a practical example — 
how to rewind a transformer with a rating 
of IK volts at 2.5 amps into one with a 
rating of 7 volts at 4.5 amps. 

Manufacturer's specifications 

Transformer ratings are usually given 

in RMS values. A secondary rated at 12.6 

volts center-tapped at 1 amp means 12.6- 

votts RMS is across the entire secondary 

that no more than 1 -amp RMS can be 

wn safely from it. The voltage from 
either end of the secondary to the center 
tap is one half the voltage across the entire 
secondary, or. in this case, 6.3 volts 
RMS. The current that can be supplied by 
each part of the secondary simultaneously 
is equal to the current rating of the entire 
secondary, or. in this case, the halves of 
the secontlar>' can supply 1-amp RMS 
each. 

The .secondary's output ratings are 
based on the as.sumption that a particular 
RMS voltage will he applied to the pri- 
Photo courtesy of Amecon Inc. 




mary of the transformer. Favorite values 
used by manufacturers are 1 10-. 117-, 
and 120-volts RMS. Note that while any 
transformer you buy new will have the 
ratings stamped either on it or its packag- 
ing, surplus or salvaged transformers 
usually will not. For the remainder of our 
discu.ssion we will assunie that the input 
to the primary is ! 17- volts RMS. 

Since the maximum power capability 
of a transformer depends on the cro.ss- 
sectional area of the iron core, the max- 
imum power that a transformer can de- 
liver is a constant. But any combination 
of voltage and current is possible pro- 
vided that the voltage limes the current is 
less than or equal to the transformer's 
wattage rating. Thus, if the manufacturer 
rates the secondary Ibr 25.2 volts at 0.5 
amps, it means that the transformer can 
supply 12.6 watts (I> = V x I = 25.2 
volts X 0.5 amps = 12.6 watts). It also 
means that the transfonner can handle any 
combination of voltage and cunenl. so 
long as the product of the two is less than 
or equal to 12.6 watts — 6 volts at 2.1 
amps, for example. 

Besides the wattage rating, the cro.ss- 
sectional area of the wire used in the 
transformer puts a limitation on the 
amount of current that ii can .supply. !f a 
transformer's secondary is rated for 22.5 
volts at 2 aiTips, the manufacturer has told 
us that the wire used in the secondary will 
safely supply 2 amps RMS at any voltage, 
provided the transfonoer is capable of 
handling the resulting power. 

Finding specifications on your own 

If you have a salvaged transformer, 
infomiation about its voltage, power, and 



current ratings is usually not available. 
That information is not that hard to find, 
however, if you follow these simple 
steps: 

To tmd the voltage rating of the secon- 
dary, first find which wire belong to the 
primary winding. Most electronics hand- 
books provide a complete color code for 
the transfonTier's wires, but let's .sketch 
out the es.sentiais here. 

The two black wires on the transformer 
lead to the primary and are where the 
117-volts RMS line-voltage is applied. 
The wires to each .secondary have a differ- 
ent color set. The wires to one secondary, 
for instance, may use a red color set — two 
solid red wires and another red wire with a 
different color stripe. The striped wire is 
the center tap of the secondary. If a secon- 
dary does not have a center tap. only two 
wires will be found in that color set. With 
the primary and secondaries identified, 
you simply use an AC voltmeter to find 
the voltages required. 

To do that, hook the transformer up to 
your household power line and measure 
the voltages on each winding. Be very 
careful in performing this step. The best 
way to go about it is to wire a plug to the 
primary, attach the .AC voltmeter to the 
winding you \^'ant to measure, and make 
.sure that there are no exposed or touching 
bare wires before plugging in Ihe transfor- 
mer. To find the voltage simply plug in 
the Iransfonner and read the voltage on 
the meter. Take enough measurements so 
that you know the voltage across each 
secondary, the voltage to each center tap, 
and the voltage applied to the primary. 
For safety, be sure to disconnect the pow- 
er before you switch the meter leads. 



(D 
00 
til 

77 






O 

o 

O 



o 

Q 
< 




TABLE 1 

Cross-Sectional Area 
(Square Inches) Power (Watts) 



1 


45 


1.25 


50 


1.75 


75 


2 


120 


2.25 


150 


2.75 


230 


3 


275 


3.25 


330 


3.75 


440 


1 4 


520 



FIG.1— TO FIND THE cross-sectional area of the transformer care, multiply L x W. Be sure to measure 
L and W in Inches 



To find the power rating of the transfor- 
mer, first find the cross-sectional area of 
the core by multiplying L x W as shown 
in Fig. 1 . Be sure to measure L and W in 
inches so the cross-sectional area is calcu- 
lated in square inches. Then, using Table 
1, find the approximate wattage rating 
that corresponds to the cross- sectional 
area. 

It is possible to reuse the wire from the 
original secondary for the new secon- 
dary. If the rating of that wire is not 
known, and there is only one secondary, 
the maximum current that the wire can 
safely handle is equal to the power 
capability of the iron core divided by the 
voltage of the winding. When there is 
more than one secondary, you would be 
better off to use the cross-sectional area of 
the wire used in each secondary to de- 
termine its cun'ent-handling capability 
(more on that later). 

Rewinding a transformer 

Since rewinding a primary is a job that 
should be avoided if at all possible (sug- 
gestions for handling that messy task will 
be given later on), the best transformers to 
rewind are those in which the primary is 
wound closest to the iron core. 
Transformers with a high-voltage secon- 
dary often have that winding wrapped 
next to the core, the primary wrapped on 
the outside of the high-voltage secon- 
dary, and finally the low-voltage 
secondaries as the outermost layer. 
Transformers with only one low- voltage 
secondary (less than 1 10 volts) usually 
have the primary wound closest to the 
core and the secondary on the outside. 
There is no way of knowing where the 
secondaries are until you disassemble the 
transformer. 

The first step in rewinding a transfor- 
mer is to determine what size transformer 



you need. To calculate the power that is 
required, multiply the voltage you need 
by the current you need. 

Using Table 1 you can approximate the 
core size you need. If the core size is not 
given in a catalogue, the total power 
capability of a transformer can be found 
simply by adding the power rating of each 
secondaiA'. 

After you get the transformer, check 
the voltages using the technique we dis- 
cussed earlier. The next step is to dis- 
assemble the unit. Take out the screws 
and anything else holding the transformer 
together. Usually the laminations are 
soaked in a special enamel and then 



baked. That is done to keep the transfor- 
mer from buzzing and to seal it from the 
environment; it also makes the lamina- 
tions hard to remove. As each lamination 
is removed, the enamel holding it must be 
broken off; when doing so it is very easy 
to damage the transformer's wires, so 
great care must be taken. 

The first few laminations are hardest to 
remove. To break the enamel seal, take a 
very small screwdriver and slip it between 
the outside edges of the lamination you ' re 
removing. If you ruin a few laminations at 
first, don't worry — you won't be able to 
get all of them back in anyway when the 
transformer is reassembled. Set the trans- 
former on a piece of plywood so that the 
lamination that you are removing projects 
over the edge as shown in Fig. 2. Work- 
ing alternately at either end of the exposed 
lamination, lightly tap the screwdriver 
until the enamel on the inside of the core 
breaks loose. Then remove the lamina- 
tion. 

After a few laminations are removed, 
one of the "I" -shaped laminations can be 




FIG. 2— TO REMOVE THE laminations, position the transformer as shown, slip a small screwdriver 
under the first lamination, and tap lightly with a hammer. 



78 



used to break the enamel seal on the 
remainder — the ones inside the coil — as 
shown in Fig. 3. Yon will still have to tap 
lightly with a hammer, but the "1" piece 
will be easier to use and cause less dam- 
age than a screwdriver. 

After removing the laminations, the 
next step is to unwind the secondaiy. As 
you unwind the wire, count the number of 
turns. When the secondary is completely 
unwound, calculate the turns-per-voh by 
dividing the turns counted by the voltage 
previously measured on the secondary. 
For example, if the output from the secon- 
dary is 12.6 volts RMS and it has 40 
turns, the lurns-per-voh ratio is 3.175. 
When there i.s more than one secondary, 
the turns-per-volt ratio for each should be 
the same. If not, you have miscounted. In 
that case, use the average of the different 
valties. 

If the voltage measurements were 
made with something other than 117- 
volts RMS applied to the primary, you 
need to adjust the turns-per-volt value. 
Or, if the line voltage in your house wa.s 
1 12- volts RMS when you measured the 
secondary voltage, but most times your 
line voltage is 120-volts RMS, you may 
want to calculate the turns-per-voh value 
with 120 volts RMS applied to the pri- 
mary. The following formula allows you 
to do that: 



Tt 



X Tn 



where T^ is the calculated tums-per-volt, 
Kmras is the voltage applied to the pri- 
mary when the values were measured for 
the Tc calculation, E^jrw is the voltage 
you are recalculating for, and Ti- is the 
turns-per-volt ratio with En^w applied to 
the primary. 

The next step is to determine the num- 
ber of turns you need by multiplying the 
tums-per-volt calculated above by the 
voltage you want. In the above example, 
if you want 6-vohs RMS, then you need 
1 9 turns (6 volts X 3.175 turns-per-volt) , 
Keep in mind that the wire you use must 
be capable of handling the maximum cur- 
rent you desire. 

The amount of current that a wire can 
handle, whether used for the primai7 or 
secondary, depends on the wire's cross- 
sectional area. The easiest way to de- 
termine its current-handling capability is 
to use one of the wire tables found in most 
complete electronics handbooks. Meas- 
ure the wire's diameter in mils, using 
either a micrometer or a wire gauge, and 
using the table find the maximum current 
that the wire is rated to handle. The cross- 
sectional area of a wire is measured in a 
unit called the circular mil (a circular mil 
is equal to the cross- sectional area of a 
wire with a diameter of one mil) and wire 
tables often include that data for a given 
wire diameter or gauge. Generally speak- 
ing, a cross-sectional area of 600 mils per 
ampere is satisfactory for small 




FIG. 3— AFTER A FEW laminations are removed, one of the "l"-shaped laminations can be used in 
place of the screwdriver. 



transformers, although areas of 500 to 
1000 mils are commonly used. If you are 
unsure about how heavy a wire you re- 
quire, it is best to remember that the larger 
the cross-sectional area, the cooler the 
transformer will operate; so choose as 
heavy a wire as is practical. 

It's best to use new wire for the new 
secondary, but, as we previously men- 
tioned, if you're careful the old secon- 
dai^'s wire may be serviceable. Bend old 
wire as little as possible, and do not use it 
if there are any spots where the enamel 
has flaked off. 

Once the proper wire has been chosen, 
the next step is to wrap the secondary. 
Wrap the wire without leaving any space 
between turns to get the maximum num- 
ber of turns in the minimum amount of 
space. Put wax paper, duct tape, or some 
other type insulation capable of with- 
standing the maximum voltage of any one 
winding between each layer. The outside 
of the last layer should be covered extra 
well and taped tightly for both your and 
the transformer's protection. 

The last step is to reassemble the trans- 
former. Fig, 4 shows how to fit the "i"- 
and "E"-shaped laminations together. 
Most likely, there will be two to four "I" 



and "E" laminations leftover — you will 
not be able to squeeze those laminations 
back into the core, but that will not sub- 
stantially affect the power rating of the 
transfoimer. 

Rewinding a primary 

Rewinding a primary becomes neces- 
sary if the prim a 17 on the transformer you 
have chosen is not wound closest to the 
iron core. That task is not recommended, 
but the information is included here for 
the industrious. 

After the tums-per-volt ratio has been 
calculated, the number of turns on the 
primary can be determined by multiply- 
ing the tums-per-volt ratio by the primary 
voltage. Using the example of the pre- 
vious section and assuming the turns-per- 
volt was calculated with a primary volt- 
age of 1 17 volts, the primary requires 371 
turns (1 17 vohs X 3. 175 tums-per-volt). 
The altemative to that procedure is to 
actually count the turns of the primary, 
which may lead to errors. 

Under the secondary's and primary's 
wire there is usually a cardboard or plastic ^ 
form. Wrap the new primai-y and secon- < 
dary on that form so that the laminations ;S 
will fit into the new windings. Use the S 

79 




FIG. 4— THE LAMINATIONS ARE reassembled as shown. Do not worry If a couple are left over— tfiat is 
sure to happen but will not have any significant effect on the rewound transformer. 



to 
O 

'Z. 

o 
tr 



o 

< 

IT 

80 



same gauge wire that the tnanufacturer 
used, but do not reuse the same primary 
wire. That's because that wire is usually a 
small gauge with enamel insulation that's 
apt to break off easily. Since the primary 
wire is usually very long, it's very easy to 
develop shorts — when rewinding primar- 
ies, doing a lot of work for nothing is not 
that uncommon. 

A practical example 

Let's look at how we can rewind a 
transformer to deliver 8- volts DC at about 
5 amps to a 5-volt regulator. That allows 
about 3 volts across the regulator. Also, 
for the purposes of this example, let's 
assume that we will u,se a bridge rectifier 
so that the transformer current rating 
would only need to be about 5 amps, since 
both halves of the AC cycle are used. 

Using those specifications we get a 
pretty clear picture of exactly what kind 
of transformer is required. With a bridge 
rectifier a center tap is not needed on the 
secondary, but a bridge rectifier drops the 
transformer output voltage (voltage get- 
ting to the filter) by about 1.4 volts. The 
peak-value output of the transformer, 
therefore, has to be approximately 9.4 
volts (8 volts -f 1.4 volts). That means 
that the transformer's power rating has to 
be about 47 watts (9.4 volts x 5 amps). 

The transfomier we'll choose to rewind 
has a secondary rated at 18 volts at 2.5 
amps. There ft)rc, that transformer hits a 
power rating of 45 watts, which is close 
enough for our purposes. 

As the transformer is disassembled, 
make notes of its characteristics. First 
thing to do is to lake the voltage measure- 
ments. For the transformer chosen for the 



example, the voltage from the center tap 
to either end of the secondary measured 
about S . 1 volts, and the voltage across the 
primary was about 105 volts. When we 
disassembled the transfonuer we found 
that the primary was next to the core, the 
secondary from the outside end to the 
center tap had 51 turns in two layers, and 
that the wire from the center tap to the 
other end of the secondary was shorter but 
had the same number of turns. Given 
those measured values, the tums-per-volt 
ratio was 6.3 (51 tuiTis -^ 8.1 volts). 
Using the correction formula, adjust that 
turns-per-volt ratio for 1 1 7 volts applied 
to the primai-y. The corrected turns-per- 
volt ratio is therefoie 5,65 — 105 vohs -^ 
1 17 volts) X 6.3 turns-per-volt. 

Knowing that, we can calculate the 
number of turns required for the secon- 
dary by multiplying the turns-per-volt by 
the voltage desired. The 9.4 volts peak 
translates to 6. 65- volts RMS (9.4 volts ^ 
y 2) so 37,7 turns are needed (5.667 
turns-per-volt x ft. 65 volts). If the line 
vohage that the transformer is to be used 
with is normally below 1 17 volts, such as 
105 volts, for instance, round the number 
of turns up to 40. 

Continuing with our example, since we 
are using a new transformer, it is reason- 
able to assume that the secondary wire 
will be in excellent condition and can be 
reused. But as we stated earlier, while the 
wire is rated for 2.5-amps RMS. we want 
a transformer capable of handling 5-amps 
RMS. The wire can slil! be used, howev- 
er, if two secondaries — wound for the 
same voltage and in parallel — are used. 
With two parallel secondaries, the trans- 
former can handle the 5-voits RMS and 



no additional wire needs to he bought. 

Cut the original secondary wire at the 
center tap. Use the shorter length of that 
wire for one secondary, wrapping it on 
top of the primary in two layers of twenty 
turns each — duct tape should be placed 
between the layers. For the other secon- 
dary, wrap the longer length of wire on 
top of the first secondary in the same 
manner- — two layers of twenty turns 
each. Start that outer secondary winding 
at the same place you started the first 
secondary and be sure to wind it in the 
same direction. The two secondaries 
must be wound in the same direction. 
Otherwise, the net effect of paralleling 
them is volt. 

The transformer is then reassembled, 
but before it can be used its specifications 
must be re-rated. Using the number of 
turns of the secondary divided by the 
turns-per-volt ratio at 1 17 volts, the out- 
put v<iltage of the transformer is 7.06- 
volts RMS with 1 17 volts applied to the 
primary (40 turns -^ 5,667 tuiTis-per- 
volt). The current rating is not as easy to 
calculate. Let's look at the problem from 
a power standpoint. The maximum power 
from the transformer is 45 watts. The 
maxiiuum DC voltage^ is less than 9,98 
volts (7.06 volts X J 2), assuming full- 
wave rectification. The maximum DC 
current that can be drawn is, therefore, 
4.5 amps (45 watts ^ 9.98 volts). For 
half-wave lectification you would divide 
that value in half. 

The approach outlined here can be ex- 
panded to multiple- voltage secondaries 
with one more hit of information. The 
sutn of the power required by each secon- 
dary must be equal to or less than the 
power capability of the transformer itself. 

One big advantage of winding your 
own transformers i,s the ability to com- 
pensate for house voltages that are slight- 
ly high or slightly low. You can also buy 
trans foimers that are on sale without 
wonying about the output voltage. You 
only need be concerned about the 
power that the transformer can handle 
safelv. R-£ 



r"-JT 


■ e B n cr. ., 


C3i O O ti D 


P P CI GTl 1 

n n En CI 4 

n i:itf fit- 






JiJI 


L.i.^SH 


:ivif 


^:H^ 




'■*■ xn-, - nan □■» 
• _ "^^ - n Cpocj-* 







"Well. now. if yoii iiisi.si on looking for 
mi.Kittkc's. if/iy. of course, you're most 
liki'ly to find one or two." 





How to Design 

Analog Circuits 

Audio Power Amplifiers 



MANNIE HOROWITZ 



Here's a look at some practical 
audio power'amplifier circuits. 




Part 2 



AS \VH FINISHED UP 

last month, we were 
designing tlie ouput slage of an audio 
power amplifier. We were aiming for a 
design that did not use output capacitors, 
but still had a stable DC output level. 

We can take the arrangement in Fig, 6 
(sec the March 1983 issue of Radio- 
Electronics), one step farther. We can 
eliminate the discrete output devices and 
use two power op-amps instead. That 
type of anangement is known as a bridge 
amplifier and is shown in Fig. 7, 

Signals arc applied lo the two op-amps. 
While the input is fed to the non-inverting 
( + ) input oflC 1 , it is fed to the inverting 
input of IC2. Thus, the signals are I8(f 
out-of-phase at the outputs of the two 
op-amps. Because a loudspeaker is con- 
nected to those two outputs, the out-of- 
phase signals add across the loudspeaker 
to reproduce the original input signal. 

Potentiometer Rl, usually about 2 
megohms, is used to set the level of the 
signal at the output. Potentiometer R2 is 
used to set the DC voltage lc%'els at the 
outputs of the two op-amps . By adjusting 
that potentiometer, those voltages can be 
made identical and no DC current will 
Oow ihrough the speaker while the circuit 



is idling. 

An interesting variation on the circuit 
.shown in Fig. 6, is shown in Fig. 8. 
Because there is no differential amplifier 
at the input, a capacitor must be used 
between the output transistors and the 
loudspeaker. Only one driver or voltage- 




amplifier stage is used here and the in- 
dividual transistors are in each leg of the 
push-pull circuit. Although that is a very 
simple circuit, amplifiers using that 




TORS entirely, this op-amp circuit is known as a 
bridge amplifier. 



I 

FIG. 8— ACCEPTABLE QUALITY at a reasonable ^ 
price is the primary advantage of this low-cost cd 
circuit. S 

81 



o 



o 



o 

LU 



o 
o 
< 

S2 



arrangement perform reasonably well. 
The big advantage here is acceptable 
quality ai a relatively low price. 

The two key component.^ in the circuit 
are Rl and R2, Resi.stor Rl is in a DC 
feedback circuit. One end is connected to 
point the point labeled "X." Here, the 
voltage is ideally equal to one-half of 
+ V(-c-, Current is applied to the base of 
Ql through Rl. Resistor R,,. connected 
between the base of Ql and + V(-c. 
works with R 1 to help stabilize the circuit 
against current variations due to tempera- 
ture changes. 

Cutxent is supplied from the collector 
of Ql to bias output transistors Q2 and 
Q3. Resistor R2 helps keep that current at 
proper levels by providing an alternate 
path through itself and through the loud- 
speaker. While there is some negative 
signal feedback through Rl, the positive 
audio feedback through R2 is in- 
significant. 

VFET and MOSFET power amplifiers 

VFET's and MOSFET' s offer some 
major advantages over bipolar devices. 
Characteristics of both types of FET de- 
vices are linear, so circuits using them 
suffer from far less distortion than circuits 
using bipolar devices. As a result, even 
when feedback around the circuit is low. 
distortion can be kept to a minimum. Be- 
cause of the minimal feedback required, 
stability problems arising from excessive 
feedback are insignificant. 

But there is one factor that must be 
satisfied if depletion-type FET's are to 
perform without breakdown. Unless their 
gates are biased, they can conduct large 
amounts of current — enough to damage 
the device. As a result, bias must be ap- 
plied to the gate before voltage is applied 
to the drain. One way to insure that this is 
done is to u.se a time-delay circuit. An- 
other is to put a cuiTent-limiting device in 
series with the drain, along with a parallel 
circuit that will short that device a few 
seconds after voltage is applied to the 
gate. 

Two basic circuits are shown in Figs. 9 
and 10. Direct coupling is used in the 
circuit shown in Fig. 9. There, a com- 
plementary pair of VFET's is at the out- 
put. Signal is fed to the non-inverting 
input of the op-amp and the output from 
that device is applied to a pair of bipolar 
devices. Signal is fed from those to the 
output transistors. 

Because junction FET's like VFET's 
must be biased so that the idling current is 
at a desirable level, the gate of the n- 
channel device is made negative with re- 
spect to its source while the gate of the 
p-channel device is bia.sed more positive 
than its source. As noted earlier, bias 
voltage must be applied to the output de- 
vices before -f- Vp^ and - Vp,;, so that the 
VFET will not be damaged. Note llie 
polarity of the drain voltages in the cir- 
cuit. Negative voltage with respect to 
ground is applied to the drain of the p- 




FIG. 9— FET'S OFFER CONSIOEt^ABLE ADVANTAGES over bipolar devices. This circuit uses 3 
complementary pair ot VFET's. 




FiG. 10— A COIWPLEIVIENTARV PAIR ol MOSFET's Is used In this power amplifier circuit. 



channel device while positive voltage 
with respect to ground is applied at the 
drain of the n-channel device. Also note 
the feedback circuit froLn the output to the 
invening ( - ) input of the op-amp. 

The circuit shown in Fig. 10 uses a 
complementary pair of MOSFET's. The 
input is amplified by Q I . The output from 
that transistor is then AC-coupled 
through C2 and C3 to the MOSFET's. 
The loudspeaker is direct-coupled to the 
power-output devices. Note that bias 
must be applied for those tran.sistors to 
conduct because they are enhancement- 
type devices. That means that for the gate 
to conduct, it must be more positive than 
the source in a n-channel device, and 
more negative than the source in a p- 
channel transistor. The time-delay cir- 
cuitry required in the previous example is 
not needed here^enhancement-type 
transistors will not conduct until the bias 



voltage is applied. 

Quasi-complementary amplifiers 

Up to now. in the complementary 
amplitlers we've described each half of 
the push-pull output stage used identical 
but complementary devices or amplifier 
circuits. Quasi-complementary amplifi- 
ers differ in that they use dissimilar 
arrangements in each leg of the push-pull 
power section. 

Let's take another look at two true 
complementary amplifiers. Those were 
shown last month in Figs. 3 and 4; the one 
shown in Fig. 3 used a Darlington pair in 
both halves of the output circuit, and the 
amplifier in Fig. 4 used a complementary 
pair. The quasi -complementary arrange- 
ment, on the other hand, uses a pair of 
each type in each half of the push-pull 
output circuit. A typical amplifier of that 
type, is .shown in Fig. 1 1 . There. Q2 and 




FIG. 1 1 — THOUGH IT ACTS just like one, this circuit does not use a truly complementary arrangement. 
Ttie chief advantages tc this quasi-connplementary amplifier are simplicity and cost. 



Q3 form a Darlington pair while Q4 and 
Q5 form ;i complementary amplifier. 
Both circuits are driven by voltaac ampli- 
fier Ql. 

Bui why use such a circuit, especially 
considering that the true complementary 
circuit has inherenily less distortion'.' The 
answer is economy and simplicity. The 
circuit in Fig. 11 will perform well using a 
minimum of critical components. 

Modifications 

A differential amplifier is used in the 
circuit shown las! month in Fig, 5, The 
sum of the currents llowing through Q 1 
and 02 must be constant. To do that, Q 1 
was used as a consiant-currenl source. 
Current could also have been held re- 
latively constant if QIO were replaced 
with a large resistor and — Vc^ made very 
large. That arrangement will keep the cur- 
rent flowing through the transistors con- 
stant, provided that the voltage drop 
across the devices in series with it is much 
lower than the voltage drop across the 
resistor itself. 

In Fig. 5, QIO. its emitter resistor, and 
the diodes from the base to - V^x-, de- 
termine how much current will flow 
through the circuit. Voltage is applied to 
both diodes through R. If they are silicon 
devices, a relatively fl.>ied 0.7 volt is de- 
veloped across each diode despite any 
minor variations in the amount of current 
flowing through each of those devices. 
Because the diodes are in parallel with the 
.series circuit consisting of the base- 
emitter junction of QIC and resistor R^. 
there must be 1 .4 volts across that series 
circuit. Of the 1 .4 volts, 0.7 volt is across 
the base-emitter junction of QIO (as.sum- 
ing, of course, that it too is a silicon 
device} so the remainine 0.7 voh must be 



across R, , Thus, the current flowing 
through Rj. is 0.7/Rt. That same current 
also flows through the emitter and col- 
lector of QIO and into Ql and Q2. Thus, 
the sum of col lector currents in Ql andQ2 
equals the the current from QIO at all 
times. 

Alternate constant-current sources us- 
ing FET's, are shown in Fig. 12. In Fig, 
l2-a. the gate is connected to the ^ource, 
making V(j^ equal to 0. Now the current 
in the drain of the transistor is 1|)<js- 'n 
Fig, 12-b. the fi.ved cunent can be ad- 
justed by the potentiometer. It's setting 
determines the gate-source bias voltage, 
which, in turn, sets the drain current. 

Anollier \\ ay to modify the various cir- 
cuits we've described is lo add some way 
to vary the bias: such a circuit would let 
you vary the idling current, A circuit of 
that type is included in the MOSFET 
amplifier shown in Fig. 13. Such an 
arrangement can also be used in circuits 
using bipolar devices. Because of the 
presence of Ql. the idling current is 
temperature-compensated, just as if di- 
odes had been used instead. 

Potentiometer Rl is used to adjust the 
amount of cunem llowing through Ql 
and hence through R2, R3. and R4, The 
voltage across R 1 . and at the gates of Q2 
and Q3 , is equal to the sum of the vohages 
across Ql and R2. Those voltages change 
with the setting of R 1 and. in turn, change 
the bias voltage applied to the gates of the 
PET'S. 

Protecting output transistors 

Output transistors are quite vulnerable 
when used in an amplifier. If a load or 
loudspeaker is shorted, the transistors 
may conduct excess current. If that cur- 
rent exceeds the rated maximum current 



permitted to flow in the device, the tran- 
sistor iriay be forced to dissipate more 
power than it safely can and the device 
inay suffer breakdown. Transistors may 
also break down if there is an in- 
stantaneous excess voltage applied across 
the device due to the presence of an in- 
ductive load. Another possible cause of 
breakdown is undesirable oscillation. 
That can be due to a capacitivc load across 
the output, such as an electrostatic loud- 
speaker. 

Several precautions can be taken to 
protect those devices. If a fuse is placed in 
series with the loudspeaker load, it should 
blow oiu before the output transistors are 
destroyed. (On the other hand, you may 
be unlucky enough that the transistors 
will be the first to go. ) Another method is 
to keep the voltage applied in the driver 
transistor at the minimum level possible. 
In another anangemcnt, verv- poorly reg- 
ulated voltage is applied to the output 
circuit, so that the voltage drops radically 
when there is a large demand tor current 
from tiie power transistors. Fortunately, 
more effective protection circuits have 
been designed. 

In the simplest arrangement, a resistor 
is placed between the loudspeaker and 
ground. Its resistance should be small — 
less than 20% of the resistance of the 
loudspeaker. Parallel-connected diodes. 




PIG. '12— CONSTANT-CUflRENT SOURCES us- 
ing FET's are sfiown hem. 




> 

FIG IS^TRANSISTOR Q1 in this circuit is used ^ 

to vary the bias voltage applied to the output S 

transistors, S 

83 



to 

y 

z 
o 

IT 



UJ 

Q 
o 
< 

a: 

64 



but wiih the caihodc of one device con- 
nected lo ihc anode o\ the second, are 
placed in a negaiive feedback loop rrum 
ihe junction of the rcsislor and loud- 
speaker to the driver transisior circuit. A 
voltage is developed across the resistor 
due tocarrem flowing through it. through 
the ioudspeaker, and ihroujih the output 
transistor. In direct-coupled circuits, that 
voltage may be due to an audio signal or 
DC. while in capacitor-coupled circuits, 
it is due solely to the audio. When that 
voltage exceeds the forward breakdown 
voltage of the diodes, they conduct and 
the resulting negative feedback reduces 
the circuit gain. 

An alternate and more effective 
arrangement is shown in Fig. 14- Current 
fromQj tlowsinR,.;, and current from Q2 
flows in Ri£2- Those resistors arc selected 
so that the voltage developed across them 
due to current from Ql and 02, turn on 
Q3 and Q4 when the output transistor 
current ratings are exceeded. After being 
turned on. traiisistois Q3 and Q4 divert 
current from the bases of the output de- 
vices. Limiting the base current reduces 
the collector currents of the output tran- 
sistors to safe levels. 

Yet another arrangement is shown in 
Fig, 15. Diodes IM and D5 are normally 
turned off. Diodes Dl , D2, and D3 con- 
duct to bias Q2 and Q3 to the desirable 
collector-current levels. If the vohage 
across R3 becomes excessive due to the 
current through Q2, diodes D5. 03, D2. 
and Dl are all turned on. forming a scries 
circuit. Those diodes are across the series 
circuit consisting of R4 and the base- 
emitter junction of Q3. Similar to the 
constant-current circuit described earlier 
in this article, the voltage across one of 
the diodes is the same as the voltage 
across the base-emitter junction. Con- 
sequently, the voltage across the resistor 
R4 must be equal to that across the 
remaining three diodes in the circuit. The 
voltage across the resistor is fixed at that 
value. Because the resistor's current is 
equal to this voltage divided by R4. the 
current flowing through R4 is also con- 
stant. That current also flows through the 
emitter and collector of Q3. Current 
through Q3 is thus limited to that max- 
imum. Because D5 is turned on, it limits 
the base-emitter voltage of Q3 and there- 
by limits the current flowing through that 
transistor to safe levels. The current- 
limiting setup is similar for R3 and Q2. 

Up to this point, we've concerned our- 
selves with limiting the current in the 
output transistors only when that current 
became excessively high. The circuit in 
Fig. 16, a variation of the one shown in 
Fig. 14, limits collector current when it 
either gets exces.sively high or when the 
output load gets to be extremely small. 

If excess current flows through R5 
from Q4, the voltage developed across R5 
is applied to the base-emitter junction of 
Q2 through R3. Transistor Q2 is turned 
on to shunt current from the base of Q4. A 




FIG. 14— WHEN THE CURRENT THROUGH Ql 
and 02 exceeds safe levels, Q3 and Q4 are 
turned on and current is diverted from the bases 
of the output devices. 



FIG. 15— THE DIODES in this circuit are included 
to protect the output transistors. 



AUDIO 

INPUT 




Fl 6. 1 6 — R ATHERTHANjustprotectingagainstexcessivecurrent,thisc)rcuitaIsoprotectstheoutput 
devices against an insufficient load. 



similar situation exists if excess current 
from Q5 flows through R6. 

Should Rl be greater than a pre- 
determined value, the voltage developed 
across the load, added to that across R5 , is 
applied to Q2. The voltage across R5 is 
1 80° out-of-phase with the voltage across 
Rl- The polarity of the sum of the vol- 
tages across R| and R5 is such as to turn 
off the shunting transistor, Q2. If the re- 
sistance of Rl is below the predetermined 
acceptable minimutn value, the voltage 
developed across Rl is low. Now the 
voltage across R5 is considerably above 
that developed across Rl- When the two 
out-of-phase voltages are added, the 
polarity is such as to turn on Q2. It can 
now shunt the base circuit of Q4. The 



magnitude of the load resistance as well 
as the emitter (and collector) current 
through Q4, are the two factors that de- 
termine if signal is to be shunted from the 
base of Q4. When the voltage across Rl is 
considered in together with that de- 
veloped across R6 due to current in Q5, 
the magnitude of Rj, is now an important 
factor in determining when shunting tran- 
sistor Q3 is to be turned on. 

Throughout this article and the pre- 
vious one, feedback arrangements were 
mentiotied as integral parts of various cir- 
cuits. Feedback circuits are important in 
many different applications. In the next 
article, we will dfscuss different feedback 
circuits, their characteristics, and their 
importance in different applications. H-E 



IF THE 

OK MACHINE 

&TOOL 

CORPORATION 

INSERT 

HAS ALREADY 

DEEN REMOVED 

YOU CAN GET 

YOUR OWN 

COPY OF 

THIS VALUABLE 

02-PAGE 
INSERT DIRECT 

FROM 
OK MACHINE 

& TOOL 

CORPORATION 

CIRCLE NO. 

77 

ON FREE 

INFORMATION 

CARD 



NEW BOOKS 



For more details use the free 
information card inside the back cover 



APPLE FORTRAN, by Brian D. Blackwood 
& George H. Blackwood; Howard W. Sams 
& Co., Inc., 4300 West 62nd Street, In- 
dianapolis, IN 46263; 23G pp. including in- 
dex; 6x9 incties; softcover, spiral 
bound; S14.95. 

This book is written for the beginning pro- 
grammer using the FORTRAN language on 
the Apple computer. Specific details are 
given for use of each keyword, the column 
relationship of the FORTRAN language, pro- 
gram statements, edit descriptions, and block 
statements. The book gives a brief history of 
computers, the development of FORTRAN, 
and an introduction to the Pascal operating 
system. 

Each new topic is presented in clear and 
concise detail. There are numerous pro- 
grams that use those details, so all aspects of 
the language are presented. The details of 
the language are broken down to the simplest 
form, and from that form those details are 
incorporated into the programs. The pro- 
grams range from the elementary level, to 
demonstrate how the specific details of the 
language are used, to an advanced level use- 
ful in the business and engineering world. 



Numerous illustrations demonstrate 
specific parts of the language, and text and 
illustrations are coordinated to make the 
learning process as simple as possible. 

CIRCLE 131 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

LEARNING TRS-80 BASIC FOR THE fWOD- 
ELS I, II, 16, AND III, by David A. Lien; 
CompuSoft Publisfiing, 1050 Pioneer 
Way, Ste E, El Cajon, CA 92020; 544 pp. 
including appendices, but no index; 7x9 
inches; softcover; 319.95 + S2.00 ship- 
ping and handling— California add 6% 
sales tax. 

This book is for anyone wishing to learn 
TRS-80 BASIC or to expand his or her pro- 
gramming knowledge. Written in a relaxed 
style, and amply illustrated, it leads the begin- 
ning user step-by-step through the many 
aspects of BASIC programming. There are 
many sample programs and ideas for writing 
custom software. Easy-to-understand direc- 
tions guide the reader toward programming 
efficiency, and most of the chapters include 
que St ion -and -answer sections that reinforce 
the material just presented. 
CIRCLE 132 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



DON'T 
FORGET 




4 



USE 

YOUR 

READER 

SERVICE 
CARD 




CIRCLE 62 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



> 

< 

to 

CD 



85 



• : : 



lYCORNER 



Cassette-speed modifications 

EARL "DOC" SAVAGE, K4SDS, HOBBY EDITOR 



A SHORT Willi. K BACK. A VHRY IHOUOHT- 

provoking letter came from Lairy White 
of Texas. He ha.s a certain brand and 
model of audio cassette player and would 
like advice on making a couple of mod- 
ifications to it. SoiTv. Larry, that [ don"t 
have that particular machine here for ex- 
perimentation, but here arc some ideas 
that you or any of our other readers can 
check out with any recorder/ player. 

Before discussing ways to vary tape 
speed, however. 1 feel it necessary to 
point out that we are very fortunate that 
tape-machine manufacturers have de- 
cided upon standard speeds for tape 
travel . The typical speeds for audio tapes 
for various application.s are 15. 7.5 (15/ 
2). 3.75 ( 15/4). 1 .875 (15/8). and 0.9375 
(15/16) inches-per-second(ips). Ail other 
things being equal, the faster the tape 
moves, the higher will be the fidelity of 
the recording. "Normal" audio cassettes 
mn at 1 .875 ips. more commonly referred 
to as P/s ips. 

Since all standard cassettes and 
machines operate at the same speed, it is 
evident that cassettes made on one ma- 
chine will play properly on another ma- 
chine (at least as far as speed is con- 
cerned). Without such standardization, 
you would not want to buy a pre-recorded 
tape: you could not send a tape to your 
buddy: and if you had to replace an old 



AN INVITATION 

To better meet your needs, Hobby 
Corner" will undergo a change in di- 
rection. !t will be changed to a 
question-and-answer fomi in the near 
future. You are invited to send us 
questions about general electronics 
and its applications. We'll do what we 
can to come up with an answer or, at 
least, suggest where you might find 
one. 

If you need a basic circuit for some 
purpose, or want to know how or why 
one works, let us know. We'll print 
those ot greatest interest here in 
"Hobby Comer." Please keep in mind 
that we cannot become a circuit- 
design service for esoteric applica- 
tions: circuits must be as general and 
as simple as possible. Please address 
your correspondence to: 
Hobby Corner 
Radio-Etectronics 
200 Park Ave. South 
New York, NY 10003 



I 



machine, your old tapes could not be 
played on the new one. The cassette 
world would be in chaos. And now. that 
obvious caveat: if you change the speed of 
a recorder/player, the only cassettes you 
will be able to play on it will be those 
recorded on it. Those tapes will not play 
on another machine. (Of course, that is 
not true if the accuracy of sound 
reproduction is unimponantl) 

With that said, let's see how to do some 
speed changing. Some of the methods 
give better results than others on a given 
machine. No one way is better or easier 
on every make or model. Proceed with 
caution. Some of the changes are 
irreversible — if they don"t work prop- 
erly , your recorder/player can be ruined 
for normal use. I would not recommend 
your applying these procedures to a good 
(expensive) machine. 

The first method — mechanical 

The most obvious way to change tape 
speed is to change the size of the capstan. 
That's the little spinning shaft that sticks 
up and squeezes the tape against a rubber 
roller, called the pinch roller or capstan 
roller (see Fig. I ). In most machines, you 
can sec those parts easily by pushing the 
Kt.AY button with no cassette in place, [f 
you aren't familiar with the capstan and 
pinch roller, stop now and check them 
out — we'll be discussing them at some 
length. 

Mechanically, there are two basic 
types of cassette players. The first type 
may be called direct-drive machines, and 
includes those in which the capstan is 
actually the shaft of the drive motor. The 
second type includes machines in which 
the capstan is driven by a belt-and-pullcy 
:irrangement — usually, the capstan is the 
shaft of a large and relatively heavy fly- 
wheel. You can determine which type 
your machine is by going into the case and 
taking a look. 

With both types, one of the factors 
determining the tape speed is the diameter 
or circumference of the capstan. At any 
given capstan rotational speed, the tape 
speed varies proportionally with the size 
of the shaft. The smaller the diameter, the 
slower the tape. The larger the diameter. 
I he faster the tape. 

Direct-drive machines 

The mechanical method of modifying 
the first type (direct drive) machine in- 



t o ;. -/ 



ORtVE BELT 



4 



[;apstan & 
drive pulley 



"•'v ^> \ PINCH 

EBASEHEAO ^-^ N \ HOLLER 

flgCORQ/PtAY *■*,, '(k^ 
HiAD.. ^ - * 




b 1 nu4..Lr:n 



FIG. 1 



volves actually changing the size of the 
capstan. If you fit a "cap" of some kind 
on the shaft to increase its diameter, it will 
pull the tape faster. Great care must be 
taken to make the cap of a material that 
will not have a tendency to cause the tape 
to adhere to it — you can imagine, and 
may have experienced, the problems 
resulting from tape wrapping itself 
around the capstan! Further, the cap must 
be perfectly round. Metal and very hard 
plastic have been used with success, 

Larry's need, however, is to slow the 
tape speed. That is what most folks want 
to do, and it involves decreasing the cap- 
stan diameter — a task which is easier said 
than done. If you really want to try that, 
remove the motor (and thus the capstan) 
from the machine and gently hold a file 
against the capstan while the motor runs. 
(If you don't remove the motor, every- 
thing may be ruined by falling filings.) 
Work very carefully so the capstan re- 
mains of equal diameter throughout the 
length that presses against the roller. The 
sides must be exactly straight — neither 
bowed in nor out. and not slanting up or 
down in a cone shape. If the .shape isn't 
right, the tape will be pulled sideways as 
well as forward and that will cause 
obvious problems. 

Do not change the size of the capstan 
much without stopping to test the results 
of your labors. The best way to do that is 
to reassemble the machine and play a 
previously recorded tape, listening for a 
change in tones of speech or musical 
pilch. In addition, record and play a tape 
at the new speed to see how things are 
working, if you are satisfied with the re- 
sults but want greater change, continue 
with the operation. 

I do not advise attempting to make 
large speed-changes in that manner. The 
main reason is that there is a definite 
relationship between speed and the power 
required from the motor. Depending up- 



86 



Our innovation. 




Tlieir imitation:- 







If you need any one of nine microwave oven rectifiers 
now, only Philips ECG is ready to deliver today. 

Ifou can tell where youi^ new markets are by checking 
out what's new from Philips ECG. 
When microwave ovens became popular, 
Philips ECG was ready first with Sylvania 
microwave oven components. When the 
computer boom hit, we were first again. 
In fact, on average, we introduce roughly 
300 new replacement semiconductors 
every year— far more than anyone else in 
the business. 

Maybe that's why even our competi- 
tion looks to us first for new ideas. But 
although they copy us, they never quite 
equal either our superior performance 
specs or our cross-reference accuracy. So 
for the best insurance against premature 



Samiconducton 




failures and call backs, demand parts from Pliilips ECG. 

\^fe're the only source you'll ever need for replacement 

semiconductors that fit and work. 

But just because the imitators can't 
keep up with us doesn't mean it's hard for 
you to keep up-to-date. To stay posted on 
all our latest advances in profit-generating 
replacement parts, stop by your PhiUps 
ECG distributor's and pick up youi^ copy 
of our new, expanded Master Guide 
(ECG212L) and our ECG Counterpoints 
new product update. For the name and 
number of your nearest distributor, 
call 1-800-225-8326 toll free (in MA, dial 
1-617-890-6107). Or just send $3,25 for 
your Master Guide to Phifips ECG, hic, 
Dept. RE, 70 Empire Drive, West Seneca, 
NY 14224. 



PhilipsECG 



'sEccntfits. 



it works. 



> 

-< 

CD 
CD 
U 

87 



A North American Philips Company 



CO 

o 

z 
o 
cr 

t- 
o 

LU 

_i 
LU 

6 

< 
68 



]\le^M^ change 

alight turn) 

again! 

Just think, no need lo buy bulbs, or climb 
on wobbly chairs or ladders. A new scientific 
development called The Button extends bulb 
life. 

The Button is a solid-state micro chip 
diode. It converts AC current to DC current 
and extends the life of a bulb Tilament 60 lo 
100 limes! 

For example, a regular bulb rated for 750 
hours would last about 32 days if burned con- 
tinuously. With The Buttott, bulb life could 
be extended up to 73,000 hours or S years. 
Less often used bulbs coutd last a lifetime! 

This amaring development works with 
any regular incandescent light bulb (not 
3-way type). I'here is even a model for 
candelabra si/.e bulbs. Just stick a Button 
to the bottom of a bulb and screw into 
socket. 

The results are ama/ing. Bulbs burn 
cooler, and give a softer less glaring light. 
Of course, the lumen output is reduced so 
you may prefer to use a larger bulb. The 
bulb's life will still be incre.ised 60 to 
100 times — just think of the money saved! 

The Button is absolutely ideal for lights 
that run 24 hours a day like exit signs and 
security lights. Major hotels, restaurants and 
corporations already use The Button. 
Resorts International Casino Hotel (Atlan- 
tic City), Butler Shoe Corporation, Sun- 
dance Hotel/Casino (Las Vegas) are just a 
few that save on bulbs and labor with The 
Button. 

The Button has no moving parts 




nothing to wear out, Its diode is a silicon 
based micro chip and the centering disc is 
made of U.L. listed G.E. Noryl*. The 
Button is engineered for safety and carries an 
unheard of 10 year warranty! 

The Button conies in packages of 12 for 
S29.9S (plus S2.45 shipping and handling). If 
you're still a bit of a skeptic (ordon't have 12 
bulbs), order a package of six for only $15,95 
(plus $1,50 shipping and handling). Either 
way. you're covered by Baystar's guarantee 
of satisfaction or your money back in JO 
days. Specify candelabra or regular si/e. 
(Maryland residents add 5% tax). 

To order: send your check or money order 
to Baystar. Credit card buyers call toll free. 

Start saving money right away! Order The 
Button today! 
Noryl* is a registered trademark of G.E. 

-CALL TOLL (-REE- 



Mon-Kri 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern lime 

(800)638-6170 

All tithcr limes call 
(800) 257-7850 




•••• 



Depl. 06E 

no Painters Mill Road 

Owmgs Mills, MD 21117 

© rhc Baysmr Company 1983 <^"l> -^"^304 



^'ELECTRONIC 




MOSICIANS 



Even U iirou ^Sp^t know an ohm from a voit, Craig 
AndertOE^I^xiewTv revised and expard^d book shows 
you how to build 27 accessoHes (l^at enhance your 
sound artd broaden yojr musical lioriions, 

If you're an otd hand al musicaJ elecironics^ you'll 
reaily appreciate tnat an ot ihese processors, from 
Tube Sound Fmzz to Phase Shifter are compatible 
and work together without creaiingno»se, signal loss. 
bandwidth compression or any of Iheolhef problems 
common to inierconnecting eftect& froin differeni 
manufacturers. There's even a complete chapter on 
how to modily and combine effeots to produce youf 
own custom pedal board. 

Low cos! project kits avaHable fromPAIA helpmal<e 
even vour first exposure to eieoironics a pleasant, 
hassle-tree experience and ihanks to ihe sound sheet 
demo record bound inio the book you Know |ust how 
the completed devtce win sound before you even start. 



CHARGE TO VISA OR MC TOLL-FREE 
1-800-654-8657 samiospmcst monfri 



DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: 

BAiH Electronics, Inc. 

1D30W WilShire&lvcl..OldriomdCiilyrOK7:]1t«, i!40S)a43 ?£?a 

I I i RUSH MY COF^Y OF 'ELECTRONIC PROJECTS FOR I 

(MUSICIANS ; S14.95 plus SI postage erwiosed. ■ 

I I <;Fhin PRPP r ATi i fvx np mviFP oa* & DoniM ittq ' 



I 

I add I 

I city. 



I SEND FREE CATALOG OF OTHER PA( A PRODUCTS. 



I 



. State - 



_i]pL_ 



I ■*^P«ERn^llWIIIW9, Inc. I 

DeplSR, 1020 W. Wilsliire Blvd.. Oklahoma City. OK 73116 
CIRCLE 34 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



on how far you go and the motor in your 
particular machine, you could reach the 
point that the motor would not be able to 
pull the tape at alll 

It is very difficult, it not impossible, to 
back out after going too far. That is an 
additional reason for not attempting to 
modify an expen.sive machine — at least, 
not until you have some experience. 

Pulley-drtven machines 

The mechanical method of modifying a 
puUey-driven-capstan machine is not 
fraught with quite as many pitfalls as is 
modifying direct-drive machines. Never- 
theless, considerable care must be taken. 
In this ca.se. your task is to change the size 
of one or more of the be It- driven pulleys. 
The general rules fur this method are; 

1 — Tape speed changes directly with 
the size of the driviuii pulley. In other 
words, decrease the diameter of the pul- 
ley on the motor shaft and you decrease 
the speed of tire tape, and vice versa. 

2 — ^Tapc speed changes inversely with 
the size of the (hivi-ii pulley. In other 
words, increase the diameter of the pulley 
on die capstan and you decrease the speed 
of the tape, and vice versa. 

So. all you have to do is locate and fit a 
pulley of the correct si?,e on the shaft and 
then install a belt of the right length. It 
isn't easy, but it can be done on some 
machines without tearing them up. (You 
can even change both pulleys.) 



Of course, you maybe lucky enough to 
find a motor that runs at an acceptable 
new speed and thai can simply be in- 
stalled where the old one was. 

The second method — electronic 

Do not overlook the possibility of de- 
creasing the speed of the motor in the 
machine whbottt making mechanical 
changes. If you can do that and still have 
enough power to pull the tape steadily, 
you have ii made. Whether or not it can be 
done depends on the motor in your cas- 
sette player. The speed of some motors is 
determined by the precisely set voltage 
applied to them — change the voltage and 
you change the speed. If fidelity is impor- 
tant, that may require the installation of a 
voltage-regulator circuit. If all that's re- 
quired is to be "'in the ball park," a sim- 
ple power resistor may do the trick . You 
might even get fancy and install a 
variabie-speed control. Then, you could 
have available a range of speeds for var- 
ious purposes. 

There are, of course, other methods of 
controlling the .speed of a motor. For ex- 
ample, you might run into a machine that 
uses the frequency of the supply voltage 
to deierniine the speed. In that case, you 
could modify the frequency-determining 
circuit. In general, to succes.sfulty change 
motor speed in a given machine, you will 
have to study the circuit used. Except for 
the method that requires filing the cap- 
stan, you can experiment with a method 
and. if you are unsuccessful, put every- 
thing back exactly as it was. 

rf you do attempt to change the speed of 
a cassette machine, choose an old/ 
inexpensive one on which to experiment. 
Study your cassette recorder/player to see 
which methods are possible, and which of 
them is most practical. Don't overlook 
the possibility of using a combination of 
methods to cause a greater change than 
you could get w ith just one. Watch out for 
the power available versus the power re- 
quired from the motor as the speed is 
changed. Also, when the speed is 
changed significantly, it may be desirable 
or necessary to change the frequency 
compensation in the record/playback cir- 
cuit(s). 

The success of your efforts to slow the 
tape speed will depend upon two factors. 
One. of course, is the care with which you 
work. The other is the minimum quality 
of sound reproduction acceptable in your 
particular application. The le.ss stringent 
your requirements, Ihc more likely you 
are lo be satisfied with the results. Good 
luck! 

Reminder 

Your questions arc welcomed, of 
course. We'll try tu answer those of great- 
est general interest to all readers. Don't 
forget that we'll be glad, also, to get word 

of any unusual circuits and applications 
that vou work out. R-E 



^^^Fordham 

Prices on 



*4CPRECISI0N 



Test Equipment 



Now Fordham is passing on to customers the hug est savings 
possible on test instalments. To help celebrate the opening of 
our new 40,000 square foot facility on Long Island, we've 
purchased an extra large inventory of B&K Precision products, 

Autoranging ^•JJ^g 

• SesCTi&Cs. 

• Range lock holds any 
range. 

« 0.1% accuracy. 

• Fast reading. 

• 0.5" LCD display. 

• Autozeroing. 

• Autopolarity on all 
ranges. 

• Audible conlinuity 
indicator. 

• Varistor and fuse over- 
load protection. 

« BF shielded. 
. Meets UL 1244 safety 
standards. 



We're offering the quality of name brand products and the 
benefits of our volume purchasing power. While supplies last 
we guarantee these unbelievably low prices. 



a-Trace, 4 Channel 100 MHz 
Dual Time Base Scope 

Model 1500 $4^ 0#%rVl 

, Reg $2575lKr Now I^IOS"" 



each 






I 



W- 



* i- 



'^njf^'% 



Q- 



««e 



Comes Wiiti Probes 



• 100 MHz response, 3.5nS rise time • JnQ/Hk, 
sweep rate with lOX magnif]; l^ S * ^^^^^^ 
four separate inputs • Dual time base . m nh 

mr.°cH?i;" "p^^^ • ^«\in:tiir^ o'Too 

sweep 20 ns to ^'.'C'^'°V"'''°^'P^^ • Delayed 
J^q^^^s* voftage and current probe calibrators. 



Low Distortion 
Function Generator 

Model 3010 

Reg.$22ftOU 

Now 

M87f2. 

• Generates sine, square and triangle 
waveforms • Variable amplitude and lixed 
TTL SQuarewave outputs • 0.1 Hz to t mHz 
in six ranges • Typical srne wave distortion 
under 0.5% from 0.1 Hz to 100 kHz •Variable 
DC ottsel for engineering applications 

• VCX)eKtemalinputfixsweep-(requencv!eslE. 



Ptfoapeak "nra nsistor 
Tester ^ 

Model 520B 
Reg.^&39^ 
Now 

,. - Hi/i n drive • V»forl« io 

• Fast testing •Hi/l^Orive^ ^^^^ 

circuit wl^f °'^^|;^°;'Random lead 

identiticalion. 



Reg. $495:00 

'420" 

•Restores color and 
WW piciure tubes 

"kenev^- Uses trie mosi 

P<>werful restoration ~^9^H^ 

CRt^E^xX^ve^tXSei^ 

even CR>s witti commrr^f "3i=°^^"'°"^. 
real dynamic tests^Tns'il^,' .""^ ^^- ^"^ ' 
tracking '"^'^"'' automatic 



FOR ORDERING OR PRICING ON OTHER TEST EQUIPMENT 



Call Toll Free 
(800) 645-9518 

^.Y.S. (800)832-1446 




■ Master Charge ■ VISA ■ COD 

■ Money Order ■ Check 

$60.00 minimym order 

GOD'S extra (required 25% deposil) 



260 Motor Parkway, Hauppauge,N.Y.11788 

CIRCLE 83 ON FREE II4F0RMATI0N CARD 



N.V Site 
tvtidvhll 4^ 

U)«KtU. 



ADD FOR SHIF*tWi *NO IHSIJflAMCE 

SIK.DO M.SO 

»?51.00i:o 500.00 «,£0 

iOi.ooEa jsa.cx) nso 

T51.D0EaKKIO.Q0 12.5D 

CVH IDOOlOO- 15.00 



> 
-< 

00 
U 

89 



THE DRAWING BOARD 



Voltage regulators and power supplies 



ROBERT GROSSBLATT 



C)Ni; rillNti THAT KVbRY bl.liCTRONlCS 

hobbyist who builds or designs his own 
equipment will eventually have to con- 
tend with is a power supply — it doesn't 
niulter whether you're working on a space 
shuttle or on an electric toothbrush. It's 
obvious that there are tremendous differ- 
ences between the power requirements of 
a rocket ship and those of a toothbrush, 
but the point is that if you're designing 
your own equipment, you're going to 
have to spend some time thinking about 
what you want your power supply to do. 

It's true that most of the things we'll be 
discussing in this column can be powered 
by nothing more complicated than a fresh 
battery and a pair of alligator clips. From 
the point of view of elegance however, 
that approach leaves something to be de- 
sired, the power supply you use in your 
designs can do a lot more for you than just 
supply power. Most notably, the power 
supply can provide proicaion. 

Even the most carefully designed pro- 
ject in the world can blow up the first time 
power is applied. But a well -designed 
power supply can go a long way toward 
saving you from having to repeat the work 
you've done in the event of a inishap. h 
can guard against short circuits; it can 
limit the current and/or voltage: it can 
offer protection from transient spikes, 
and so on. in short, it can be an extremely 
valuable friend when your project is still 
in the development stage. Let's look at 
some of the many possibilities. 

Series regulators 

There are many different approaches to 
power-supply design, but this time we're 
going to see what we can do with the 
simple series regulators that we're all 
familiar with. Those are three-tenninal 
devices that are set up internally to pro- 
vide a fixed output-voltage of a particular 
polarity. 

The 78xx series of positive regulators 
(and the 79hx series of negative regula- 
tors) are usually used by themselves to 
provide basic vohage regulation in small 
electronic systems. Like most thitigs 
though, those IC's can be made to provide 
as many exotic features as we want, in- 
cluding the ability to handle much more 
current than their basic rated capacities 
would seem to indicate. 

Just about everyone is familiar with the 
circuit shown in f-'ig. 1 , a basic five-volt 
regulator. Capacitor CI is the huge filter 




capacitor that sits across the output of the 
rectifier. It's used to smooth out the 
spikes (ripple) on the line and to "'brute- 
force' " regulate the voltage going into the 
7805. Even though the regulator was de- 
signed to reject noise, (refened to in the 
specs as "ripple rejection"), it can only 
cope with noise that is a certain propor- 
tion of the input voltage. Put simply, the 
bigger the input-voltage fluctuations, the 
more noise at the output. 

Capacitors C2 and C3 are also filter 
capacitors. They are generally less than 
one /iF and provide the regulator with 
local help in dealing with transients. If the 
regulator is physically far away from the 
large filter capacitor (CI), a voltage, 
however small, can develop on the line 
connecting the rectifier and the IC, The 
job of C2. therefore, is to make sure that 
those small voltage transients are elimin- 
ated before they reach the regulator. 
That's why C2 is always located as close 
to the regulator as possible — in some sys- 
tems it will be soldered right to the regula- 
tor pins. Capacitor C3 does the same job 
at the output of the device. 

Capacitor C4 can be called the "surge 
capacitor' ' because its job is to take care 
of the sudden surges that show up on the 
system -l-V line during power-up or 
power-down. The size of those surges, 
and consequently the size of C4. depends 
on the cuixenl drawn by the system. Typi- 
cally though, the value of C4 is some- 
where between 10 and 100 fiF. 

The 78xx family of regulators (and 
most other series regulators) is designed 
to be as foolproof as possible. The regula- 
tors monitor their intermi! temperature; 
and tfthey get too hot. they turn off. Shoit 
circuits will also cause the IC's to shut 
down. The trip point isn't a definite figure 



because it depends on the input/output 
voltage difference and the temperature. 
In general, a 78xx-series regulator that is 
well heat-sinked will be able to handle 
about an amp — but that's really the upper 
limit. 

Now that we understand the circuit in 
Fig. I. let's see what's wrong with it. Asa 
side note here, one rule of design is al- 
ways to design with worst-case operation 
in mind. Remember Murphy's Law and 
don't forget that one of the drawbacks to 
original design- work is that the responsi- 
bility for backing the warranty is yours. 

Problems 

Someone once said that there's no such 
thing as a free lunch, and that applies 
here. We're using capacitors to help the 
regulator minimize noise and transients, 
but capacitors cause another problem. A 
rapid reduction in either the input or out- 
put voltage will cause the capacitors to 
discharge. How much discharge current 
is generated depends on a lot of 
variables — the values of the capacitors, 
the rate of voltage reduction, and so on. 
Most regulators are built to withstand a 
ceilain amount of discharge current, but 
the unpredictability of the amount of that 
current makes for a real problem. In order 
to put things in perspective, consider that 
a 10 pif capacitor can develop 20-amp 
spikes when it's shorted. 

If you're designing a power supply 
only for low-current systems, that doesn't 
present much of a problem. But if you're 
going to need a healthy amount of cur- 
rent, soniething has to be done to protect 
the regulator against accidental capacitor- 
discharge. 

It will help to think of the regulator as a 
bunch of control circuits with a beefy 
pass- trans is tor at the output. In Fig. 2 we 
show only C! and C4: since C2 and C3 
are relatively small, we don't have to pay 
as much attention to theni. 

In the case of an input short, we have a 
big problem with C4. When the input 
short occurs, CI will discharge through it 
and the input voltage to the collector of 
internal pass-transistor Ql will rapidly 
fall to zero. That means the output voltage 
will be greater than the input voltage. 
Since C4 will have stored a nice, healthy 
charge, it will start to discharge. Some of 
the discharge current will go through 
R,,. — the equivalent resistance of the reg- 
ulator's protection circuitry. If the current 



90 



'i 



QUALITY • LOW PRICES 



1 



• \Ti 



from FORDHAM of course. 




MODEL V-1880 



BP STAB LI ZEIVI MAGE ENHANCER/RF CONVERTER/ 
VIDEO FADER/2-WAY DISTRIBUTION AMPLIFIER 

OUR PRICE $1 35.00 each 

Most versatile video processor. Contains five units in one: stabilizer (video guard 

removerl; image enhancer; video to RF converter, video (ader; and dual output 

distribution amplifier. 

Stabilizer Will correct entire range of copy guard distortion such as jitter, 

vertical roli or blacl< bar travelling through picture. 

Enhancer Lets you attain best picture for your ov^n preference, 

BF Converter Allows your TV set to receive video and audio signals (rom your 

image enhancer, guard stabilizer, video camera, computer, VCR. etc. The direct 

video signal from any video component can be fed into the V-1880 and 

converted to a usable RF signal that can goto your VJ antenna terminals. 

Video Fader Used to produce professional fade ins and fade outs. 



BP VIDEO GUARD STABILIZER 

MODEL 

V-1875 




OUR PRICE $45.00 each 

Has sell coniained A&B and bypass swiicti Many 
movies, concerts and special orograms for sale or 
rental are copy guarded. This removes copy guard 
and allows you lo make copies. Mary TV sels will 
not play prerecofded tapes becausfi copy guard 
causes picture io roll and finer, turn lo snow or 
disappear. Video Guard Stabilizer removes copy 
guard from signal. 



BP VIDEO GUARD STABILIZER/ 
RF CONVERTER 

MODEL 
V-1877 




OUR PRICE $69.95 each 

Same as above but with a built-in RF Coriverter 
trial gives ihe model V-1877 an RF outpul which 
can tie led direcily to the anienna ierminais of a 
TV set "Hi is enables you lo remove the copy guard 
from a pre-recorded iape and view il on a TV using 
only a VCR, 

Use as an RF Converter only. Used in coniunc- 
tion with your TV. you can leed direci audio and 
video signals Irom any video device such as video 
camera, computer, pcslable VCR, etc 



BP VIDEO COMMAND CENTER 

MODEL V-4B03 tfreo QR 

OUR PRICE 9^3 ■i'O each 

A switcher that can 
accept 6 inputs and 
direci ihem to 3 out- 
puts. Llliiizes switch 
similar to one used on 
home VCR 5. You avoia 
signal loss Incurred by 
using splitters. 



RICE $59.95 each 



JERROLD 60 CHANNEL 
CORDLESS TV CONVERTER 

MODEL DRX-3-105 

CALL FOR PRICES 




• Receive up to 60 TV channels • Remote TV 
Control • Allach to any age or model TV in 
minutes. •No tools required. • OrvOfI button. 

• Channel selection. • Channel Stepping. • Fine 
Tuning. 



JERROLD JRX TV REMOTE 
CONVERTER 

MODEL JRX-3C105 {SWITCHJ 

OUR PRICE $79.95 each 

Consists o( two units _i.i___i^:;LL_ 

- a receiver and i^fJi^^Xtttmt.y* 

iransmiller. 20 ft. con- 
neciing cod is detach- 
able ai one end to 
helpyoij position Ihe 
unii May be atlactved lo 
any age or model TV in 
minules. No tools required. 
• Recave up to 36 channels. • Remote 
TV control. 



BP VIDEO CONTROL CENTER 

MODEL V-4802 <t>-in rtC 

OUR PRICE %1 9. 93 each 

Provides remote con- 
trol access of aii 
Video. TV or Cable 
inputs to TV or Big 
Screen TV trom one 
location by Hipping 
switch 

• One outpul, your 
TV set or Big Screen TV 
» Four inpuls • Completely passive, i.e. no AC 
poiflier required lo operate ♦ Auxiliary input and 
outpul provides added ISexibilily. 






BP UHF CONVERTER FOR TV 
AND VTR 

MODEL V.5736 <k«^ qj- 

OUR PRICE ^Z^l-.yO each 

5 FOR $100.00 

Use your VCR to its 

maximum capability. 

Record VHF. UHF, 

Cabte or Pay TV while 

walching any other 

mode. 

FEATURES • 36 channels 

• Allows complele programming 
of VTR • Super color quality 

• Watch or record any combination 

of selectable channels. • Receives midtiand. 
superband/Pay and all VHF channels on UHF. 

• For Bela/VHS type recorders or TV set • Record 
and use TVs remote control. 

BP IMAGE ENHANCER 

MODEL V-1860 

Dfamatically improves 

performance 

ot video 

cameras 

and VCR's. 

{ofl-the-air 

or second 

generalion 

recordings}, 

by compensa 

ling (or deleriora- 

lion ol deiail and 

sharpness. Incljdes video dislribution amplifier 

nwiTh iwo video outputs, allowing you lo make two 

copies ai once witliout loss in signal level. 

BP RF CONVERflER/MODULATOR 

MODEL V'l 885 

OUR PRICE $39,95 each 
Allows your TV 

lo receive video 
artd audio signals 
Irom image en- 
hancer, guard 
stabilizer, video 
camera, compuier, VCR, etc. 
The outputs of many video 
com[>Dnenls cannoi be direcHy hooked up lo ihe 
VHF antenna terminals on vour TV seL This 
probtem ts solved by using ihe Mode^ V-ieS5 RF 
Converter. Conveils vjdeo signal from any video 
compcneni to adiusiable RF signal al anienna 
terminals Allows your VCR oulpul lo leed hvo TV 
sels al the same lime, with virtually no signal ioss 




OUR PRICE 
^>Qy*90 each 





N.V, Stdte 
n«idBnr« add 
■ppr^priAta 



■ Chvck 



COD'i axtr« {raqulfsd 3S9b dap(nill|| 



ADD FOR SHIPPING AKD INSURANCE' 
nso.oo M.&O 

S251.00ID 500.00 0.&O 

S01.00IO 7S0O0 OM 

751.CMI1O10QO-W ia.50 

OW*r10O0.OO 15.00 



TOLi 



in N.Y. State call 8O0-832-1446 



CIRCLE 83 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



> 

< 

CO 
OD 

9t 



GROUtlD 



tn 
o 

z: 
o 
tr 
I— 
o 



o 
a 
< 

92 




is substantial enough, R,,. isn"i going to 
pass it last cnnugli antltjie emitter-hase 
junction of Ql is going to be reverse 
biased. If the eunent is great enough. Ql 
is going to break down and the regulator 
will be — to use a technical term — 
zapped. 

Fortunately, an output short isn't any- 
where near as serious. In ih;tt ca.se. C4 
will discharge across the output short and 
the input voltage will be greater than the 
output voltage. Luckily, the regulator 
was designed to deal with that. It W'ill start 
to puss more and more current until its 
ihcrmal -overload point i.s reached and it 
shuts down. Remember, the regulator 
was designed to source current, not sink 



SWITCHING POWER SUPPLIES FREEl 

Our gift to you for trying IbCTTJIinc products isafullcashaltowancetoward your second 

order. Once convinced that our switchers are the best and you're ready to re-order, 

include your original invoice and we'll deduct the face <«S!^ 

value (less handiitjg) providing your order totals 4X _j^ ^^^ 

the original invoice cost This calculates to 25% -^ ' ^^==*^=^ .c:?;-^*.,. 

below our quantity pricing! Offer ends 7/1/83. 

L-cam inc. is determined to become a y' 

leader in the switching power supply ^ -'''' 

field, Wa offer advanced cifcuitry, 
quality, variety and the bast price/per- 
formance ratio in the industry. This 
ad shows only part of our tine which 
includes 18 to 150 watt switchers, ail 
with "off the shelf" derivery. We also 
custom build switching power sup- 
plies to your exact specifications. 
The benefits our products offer: 
■Most popular voltage/current out- 
put. VShort circuit/ overload protec- 
tion. SBuilt-in EMI IRFI) line filter. ' 
•Screw terminal strips. (Soft start ' ' 

feature protects the critical semies. 
•Parallel operation acceptable for 
higher current. •LED "On" indicator 
and Volt-Adj. an panel. •U.L. recog- 
nized components. •AS hr. burn-in 
assures predictable, trouble-free ser- 
vice. VAnodized ma^l ~~'~ 




mti 90'132VAC or DC. 47-44.0^1/. 
(A, S & D Series). 
90-132, iaO'2e5VAC Seiectabie 
{Cr Series only). 
Line Protcctiortj Each Une Internally 

tused- 
Line Regulation; -±-0.1% max. for 

Jil0% ctiange. 
Load Regulation: -to, 2% max. 

50/100% Rated Load. 
Ripple & Notset Typical 1% p-p max., 

all outputs. 
Drift: Less than 3% after 10 mEnute 
warm up (A & C Series), 
Less tnan 1% after 10 minute 
warm up [B & D Series). 
Converter Frequency: 

RCC System^ 30kHz (A & C Series), 

FCC System, 50kHz (e & D Series), 
Efficiency: 65% - 75% Typical. 
Temperature Range: 

Operating, — 10°C to h-SO^C. 

Storage. — 25^C to +80^0. 
Over Curi-ent Protection: AN outputs 

sriort circuit protected by current 

toldback vj\\h automatic recovery 

after fault removaL 
Over Voltage Protection: All outputs 

limited to 130% of rated voltage 

In event of internal failure. 

(A Series, not provided). 
Recovery Time: Less than 300 ms 

to within 0,5% final value ttVDL 
M.T.B.F.; Excess of 35,000 hours. 
Metal Enclosure: AnodUed matte tan, 
Hofd-up Time: 35ms fmax) after loss 

of normal AC power, 

CALL TODAY (617) 682-6936. 







C tKJ2 






13V 1 ]« 
^BV'IA 

I7V4A 
15V 3A 

■T3V-34A 
■IfiV 2A 



7*V 4A 

SVIOA 

'aVlA 
&VIA 
Sv IDA. 



-avflA 

-17V J s* 

lavaA 



-*V HA 
'13V 1* 

• iav 1* 



-ISV.I bA 

■34V 1.SA 



ita« 

lifts 

iift» 

l^VfA 

1»« 
mts 

]»« 

1H-H 



1HDS 

ttS.H 



t14 7fl 



155.716 
ti5.T« 
t'Sa.7« 

HUH 



i7^i 
•3.-9? 

u.ii;r 

17.17 
7.17 
t7.l7 



I32S7 
11? SI 
1JI»7 
1»«7 

l5ftflT 

13-4 n? 

13??]' 



U 



line 1545 OSGOOD ST., UWIT 11AL NO. ANDOVER, MA 01845 




REGUU^TED 



FIG. 3 



it. Tliafs why an input slian is so much 
tiuirc potentially dangerous than an out- 
put shon. 

In order to protect against input shorts, 
we have to Find a way to provide an es- 
cape path Inr tlie discharge cun'ent ofC4. 
We'll add a diode as shown in Fig. 3. 

Adding protective diode Dl gives us a 
really slick solution to the problem. If the 
input shorts out now. the discharge cur- 
rent from C4 will forward bias the diode 
and all the ■'bad"' current will be shunted 
to ground through the input short. You 
may wontier why the diode doesn't bleed 
off some of the '"good " current when the 
regulator is operating normally. But 
we're out of space, so you'll have to wait 
until next month fcir the answer. R-E 



CHNICIANS. 
serious a.jout 



Gets 



Now you can ordar 
the "Study Quids for 
the Associate — Level CET 
Test" from the Intemational' 
Society of Certified Electronics 
Technicians. It Includes material 
covering the most often missed 
questions on the Associate CET 
Exam. BVj" x 11", paperback, 



Send check to ISCET, 2708 W. 
Berry St., Ft. Worth, TX 76109. 

Name 



Address 

City 

State 



Zip _ 

copies @ $5.00 ea,_ 



Send material about ISCET 
and becoming certified. 



CIRCLE 74 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




When TCG first set out to make a complete line of 
replacement semiconductors of outstanding quality 
and value, the big guys tended to look down at us. 
Now, four successful years later, tfiey're suddenly 
seeing us from a wfiole different perspective. In fact 
TCG now offers more replacement numbers than 
either G.E. or RCA. 

We've grown so fast because we give you more of 
what you were buying the other manufacturer's parts 
for. We test our parts extensively on state-of-the-art 
equipment during every phase of production. That 
means you get top quality, backed by our full, two-year 
replacement warranty. And while we already offer one 
of the industry's most extensive parts lines, we're con- 
tinuing to add more each year That's why technicians 
in the know are turning to TCG's Replacement Master 
Guide, cross referencing over 210,000 different parts 
numbers. 



Our special, computer-controlled inventory system 
means that when you decide to replace or design with 
TCG, you'll always find the part you need on your 
distributor's shelf. So, look for TCG replacement parts 
in either polybags or carton packs with device type, 
rating limits, package diagrams and competitive 
replacements right on the package. 

While it's been a tough year for almost everyone else, 
thanks to all of you smart technicians it's been the best 
year ever for TCG. 

G . E. J£ a re^ Is.Eqj' e{J trad Bmark ot 
the General Eieclric Company. 




NEW-TONE ELECTRONICS 
TECHNICIAN COMPONENTS GROUP 

44 FAR RAND STREET 
BLOOMFIELD, NJ07003 



FIND TCG REPLACEMENT PARTS AND THE TCG REPLACEMENT MASTER GUIDE 

AT YOUR NEARBY DISTRIBUTOR. 



5 

S 

93 



SERVICE CLINIC 



An oddball output-stage probiem 

JACK DARR, SERVICE EDITOR 



WHAT WOULD YOU DO (N THE FOLLOWING 

situation? Assume iliat a set comes to you 
for repair with a blown fuse and a shorted 
horizontal -output transistor. That's noth- 
ing unusual so far, so you would probably 
replace the fuse and transistor. Now. 
would you plug the set in and turn it on to 
see the results? Ww I If you did, you might 
find that you then had two dead output 
tjansistors — one of which belonged to 
youl For safety, plug the set into a Variac 
(a variable-output transformer), run the 
line voltage well down, and measure the 
current through the fuse. Then, slowly 
increase the output voltage of the trans- 
former, watching the ammeter carefully 
to see that it doesn't go out of bounds. 
Keep an eye on the DC voltages, too. 

There is a new variation of this too- 
common symptom that's been popping 
up in my mail quite often lately. In fact, it 
appeared twice in one batch last week. 
That variation has the same symptoms to 
start with, and when you replace the tran- 
sistor and fuse, you find that there's still 
too much current being drawn by the new 
output transistor. Here's the oddball 
thing: Grounding the base of the output 
transistor brings the current back down to 
normal 1 I'll count to ten while you're 
thinking of what could be responsible for 
that. It's a good symptom because it's one 
that tells us something — it clears the pre- 
vious stages. It tells us that the output 
stage is working (because the drive is 
there), and that it's trying to drive the 
flyback and all of its loads {the low- 
vohage DC supplies from the flyback, the 
yoke, and the tripler — see Fig. 1 ). Before 
we go any farther, you did check the 



regulated DC voltage, didn't you? If not, 

do so. 

What's causing the problem? 

Now that the previous stages are clear, 
we know that we've got an overload prob- 
lem somewhere in the flyback or its load. 
If the tlyback uses a yoke-return capaci- 
tor, that could be shoiled. To find the 
exact cause of the problem, the old pro- 
cess of elimination is best. Check all of 
the low- voltage diodes, their filter capa- 
citors, etc. for shorts. The best way to 
check the rest of the loads is by load- 
shedding — unhook suspected things (the 
tripler, the yoke, etc.) one at a time and 
then recheck for excess current. 

The yoke can be checked by unhooking 
it. Many sets have a B -(- jumper on the 
yoke plug and you'll have to jumper that 
with a clip lead. If your test indicates a 
short, check the yoke-return capacitor be- 
fore condemning the yoke. The ■"4- 
legged capacitor" (which is used as a 
collector-shunt capacitor on horizontal- 
output transistors) can be checked with 
the ohmmeter or by unhooking it and 
jumping it to gel collector voltage to the 
output. Those capacitors don't seem to 
short too often, but sometimes, neverthe- 
less, they do. 

Check the flyback circuit. Some of 
them have a tuning coil in the output. 
Check that for .shorted turns, and check 
the capacitor across it. One more thing: In 
most sets, the pincushion-correction cir- 
cuits are hooked to the flyback/yoke. 
Those, too, can develop shorts in the 
transformer or capacitors. You might also 
have a wiring short or arc-over. 




Fits. 1 



Once again 

To sum things up, what you have to do 
is check everything that could cause the 
flyback to be overloaded, and thus cause 
the symptoms you're seeing. If doesn't 
take as long as you'd think. What you 
have to do is eliminate everything that 
could overload a good flyback, and if it all 
checks out, then you're left with one thing 
that could be causing the problem — the 
flyback itself. Because of the high cost 
and difficulty of replacing flybacks, we'd 
recommend that all the other tests be 
made first. Replacing a flyback and find- 
ing that you still have the same old 
symptoms can be a real bumnier. Some- 
thing like that can ruin a technician's day 
(and a couple of days' profits!). So, make 
sure that you have eliminated everything 
that iotild cause an overload on a good 
flyback before you suspect the flyback 
itself. 

We check things like that because what 
we're dealing with is an "AC short." 
Note thai there is no short when there's 
nothing but DC on the flyback (when the 
base is grounded the DCs still there). But 
when we start feeding drive pulses into 
the flyback, we see the short. So. some- 
thing like a shorted winding in the fly- 
back, or an overload on one of its outputs, 
is responsible for the short symptoms. 
We're "pumping into a short" when the 
tlyback is getting normal drive. 

The scope can be a lot of help in check- 
ing things. You can (should!) check the 
base drive for correct frequency, peak-to- 
peak voltage, etc. Judging from the 
symptoms, something will be there. With 
the voltage reduced, check each output 
for pulses. On a working output, you 
should see the normal pulse as shown on 
the schematic, but at a reduced level — the 
pulse level will be in proportion to the line 
input. If you've reduced the line voltage 
to one half of normal, the pulse should be 
only one half of the normal amplitude. 
Quick checks of the low- voltage supplies 
can use the same test and ratios. You can 
even check for pulse input to the tripler; 
hold the probe near, but not touching it, 
and check for a good high pulse. If you 
find an output that should have a pulse but 
has nothing, that could be the shorted 
winding. Disconnect everything from 
thai terminal and check the resistance at 
that point. It will be very low. and you 
may not get a usable reading. Turn the set 
on with the winding open and check for a 



94 



This talking phone TELLS you in clear English what numbers you're dialing. 

we'll Try to Describe Everything" 

This Space-Age Phone Does in one Page 

of Smaii Type, it won't Be Easy. 

Each key ilm a stpemtt fuftx'ium. hMh unfLiti ^ w ><14(, t/fitu 
ii'ont U to. What a con vwsaium piece 2het vrrj/ihuig f*hijite it .' 




Vte E^tythirtx Pkcme is a hattdsomt, ctmiftnpofnty 
i\xiry phone wiihasiondafttmodtUarfitvx. rvacbftoifi. 



It's as though someone said — 

"Let's think of everything any telephone 
can do, and con-ibine them into one fantastic 
instrument," 

Someone did say that. This is it. 

We call it THE EVERYTHING PHONE be- 
cause it does everything. It advances the 
science of phone communications by ten 
years, even in this age of wild changes and 
Improvements. 

Forexampie— 

This Phone Actually TALKS To Vou 

The Everything Phone speaks to you in a 
warm, gentle voice. It never tells you wrong. 

Touch the "Voice' ' switch and when you 
push a button, the phone tells you the num- 
ber you've pushed. If vou're working in dim 
'light, you won't dial a wrong nurnber, be- 
cause your friendly phone voice repeats 
each digit immediately, as you dial it. 

A Complete Phone Answering System 

If you press the "Prefix" key, the "Clear" 
key, the Direct Memory Keys, or any of the 
other special function keys (more about 
these later), your Phone Voice tells you what 
you've pushed. If you get tired of company, 
you can shut off the voice; but it's like hav- 
ing a friend right inside your phone. 

This feature takes some explaining, 

Iri the bank of keys to the right of the dial 
pad are three marked Ml , M2, and M3. Ml 
and M2 will tell a caller, when you're out, 
either when to call back or another number 
where you can be reached 

What about M37 

tifl3 makes any cassette recorder an 
answering device. Using the connector Isup- 
plied), your recorder can take messages up 
to the total length of any tape cassette. The 
Everything Phone turns the recorder on and 
off automatically when a call comes in. 

So — you have your voice of 11 a message, 
in the phone's own voice, to call back at 
whatever hour you designate; 2) a message 
that you're out and can be reached at what- 
ever number you designate; 3) an invitation 
to leave a message after the tone, with a capac- 
ity as long as the cassette — an hour or more. 



Memory Keys Galore for Automatic Diuling 

At the left of the numeric keypad are ten 
Direct Memory Keys. The key at the upper 
left is for MCI, Sprint, or other computer- 
code dialings. It holds the access number 
and your personal code number. 

The other nine let you dial stored num- 
bers, including long distance numbers, by 
pressing one key. You can inset a tab show- 
ing whose number is stored. 
But you ain't see nothin' yetl 
You actually can store up to 50 numbers 
of 20 digits each, using a two-number code. 
Example: if you already have 30 numbers in 
memory and you want to store 1 -305- 
473-2044, punch in that number, use the 
"Store" key and "31 ", and you'll be able to 
dial that number in the future just by press- 
ing "31 ". 

Quality Speaker-Phone 
Of Course The Everything Phone has one- 
way speaker-phone capability. Of course it's 
high quality sound. 

Just press the "Speaker" button and you 
have a hands-free phone. A volume control 
gives you just the right amount of amplifi- 
cation. 

Music on Hold; "Mute" Switch 
You can put a caller on hold just by pressing 
the "Hold" key. What a pleasant surprlsel 
Instead of dead sound, the person on hold 
hears a pleasant melody, (You'll hear it too, 
so you won't forget he's on hold.) 

You have a "Mute" privacy button, and it 
couldn't be more convenient — it's right in 
the center of the modern hand-phone. Press 
that button, and although the other party 
won't be able to hear you, you'll still be able 
to hear him or her. Release the button and 
communications are normal again. (No tell- 
:ale "click" when you press the IWute button.) 

Here's a List of Other Built-in Benefits 
Your Everything Phone is an electronic 
butler. It has- 

— Automatic redial. Press this key and your 
phone will redial the last number you called 
either once ( if the phone is of f the cradle) or 
four times (if the phone is in the cradle). 



— Pulse'Tone selector switch In areas 
with rotary dialing only, slide the switch to 
"P". In areas with touch-tone, slide it to "T". 

— Ringer off switch You can turn off tha 
pleasant "chirper" (it isn't a holll when ynu 
don't want to be disturbed A separate ringer 
Le.d. light will alert you, if you're interested. 

— Access pause key. For Sprint, MO, 
and other code numbers, the Pause button 
gives you the proper gap heiwaen the original 
dialing and the time the system takes to 
answer with a tone. The Pause has ol)ier 
uses, too, but we just can't list all (,[ them 
here. 

— Secretarial aids. Open a Ijtila door and 
you have a memo pad to jf>t notes For the 
numbers stored in automatic dialing memoiy, 
slide out the Directory Card, concealed under 
the phone unit. 

— Battery backup. Two tiny, easily re- 
placeable batteries keep your memory intact. 
A power failure, even one that lasts tor 
months, won't wipe out what's stored in 
the memory. 

Anything Elos? 

Probably. We ourselves haven't figured 
out all the phone assistance The Everything 
Phone can give you. But we do knoi/v this: 

No other phone ever made has all the 
benefits and comforts this one has for ytiii. 



CAN YOU BELIEVE IT? 

THE EVERYTHING PHONE 

IS YOURS FOR .JUST 

$199 95 

two for only $189 95 

i+ $4.50 shipping eacti) 



Order your EVERYTHiNG PHONE 

by lifting your old fashioned phone 

and catling loll-fraa: 

1-800-227-1617 

Ask far Operator No. 110 
in California 1-800-772 3545 

Have your VISA or MasterCard handy 

Phones are manned sever> days a week, 

24 hours a day 



We Absolutely Guarantee! 

The Everything Phone is a lot of tun, and it's 
the darnedest electronic Insttiimont you 
ever owned. But if at any time during the 
first full month you own it you decide not 
to keep it, send it back and we'll refund 
every cent you paid. 



Send check or money o(der, or charge card 
information (S199,9S -i- $4.60 shipping - 
Total, $204,45) to New Horiions, or call the 
toll-free number above. 

The Everything Pfione 
is another electronic marvel from 

newHORizoMs 

□apt RE-5, 245 Fifth Avenue 
New York, N.Y. 10016 



~1 — 




to 
o 

z 
o 

a: 

I- 
o 
ui 
_) 
m 

O 

Q 
< 

CL 

96 



One of America's two greal 
probes. Imagine stocking only one probe 
for er>gineenng, field service. QA and 
production lest scopes. TPI's wide «jnn- 
pensation range and 250 MHz tiandwidth 
provide this economy and simplicity. 

Available in: X1 attenualion; X10; 
X10 with aulomalic scale laboring; 
X100; X10 (300 MHz): and a 
switchable X1-X10 universal probe. 
TPI Modular Probes will accept 
accessories trom major scope 
manulai^urers. 



INSTANT 

REPAIR 

Probe tip, 
bead, BNC 
and cable all 
screw irrto 
place easily 
and quidfly. 



$59° 

M12X10 /^ 




I" 

PROBES, INC. [[ni 



Speci^ists 



CXXJNE US. SALES S STOCKING SCUBCE 

PO Box 2113. La Jolla, CA 92038 D (619) 459-4197 



CIFIC1.E 85 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Radio ElGGtroniGS "''""' 



BOOKSTORE 



D Build Youi Own Satellile TV Receiver $7.00 

D 8-B3II Satellile TV Antenna iS.OO 

D Build Your Own Robo! S.12.00 

n TV Dcscrambler [January. February 1981) J3.00 

D Video Enlerlainment (^nuary 1982] SZ.OO 

P Your 0*n Cwnpulet (Dclober 1961) 13.00 

n RadlD-EiecliDnics bart issues (1982) $3.00 

(January 1932 not available) 

Write in issues liesited . 



D Radio-Elecitonlcs bact; issues (1961) 
(Marcti, Oerember 1981 not available) 
Wile in issues desired 



1350 



D Radio- Electronics back issues (1978-79) . 
(October. Novembet 1976 nol available) 
D Write in issues deaied 



.$4.00 



n Radio-f ledrotiics back issues (1980) S4.00 

(March. May 1980 nol available) 

TOiie in issues desired 



n SpBciai Projects (Winter 19SC) $4.00 

□ Special Projects (Spring 1981) $4.00 

n special Pioiecls #4 (Sutnmer 1982) $4 00 

D Special Ptojects #5 (Winter 1983) S3 00 

D Radio-Eiecironics Annual 1983 $2 50 

n Hw to Make PC Boards ,„ .$2 00 

n All Aboul Kils . $2.00 



To order any ol Ibe items indicated above, cbeok oil Ihe ones 
you want, (iranplete Ihe oider lorm below, include your pay- 
meni. check ot money order (DO NOT SEND CASH), and mall 
to Radio -Electronics, Reprint Department, 200 Park Ave, 
South, New York. NY 10003 Please allow 4-6 vieeks lor 
delivery. 

If you need a copy ol an arllcie Itiat is in an issue we indicate is 
unavailable you can order it directly Irom us. We charge 50t 
par page. Indicate the issue (monlh & year), pages and article 
desired. Include paymeni in tull, plus shtppino and handlir;g 
charge. 



ARTICLE 



MONTH 



YEAR 



P/iGES 



TOTAL PAGES 



. @ 50e each . 



TOTAL PRICE 



MAIL TO: Radio-Electronics 5 83 

BeprinI DeparlinenL 200 Park Ave. Soulh, New York. NY 10CO3 All payments must be in U.S. funds 

Tolal price oi order S . 

Sales Tax (New York Siaie Residents only) $ 

Shipping S Handling (US & Canada only) (Intiiudes FIRST CUSS POSTAGE) $1.00 per ilar . . . . $ 

All other (S2 DO pet ilem. sea mail) S 

($4.00 per ilem, air mail) S 

Total Enclosed . . S ^_ 

Name 

Arid ress 

City — 



. State. 



.2i^. 



pulse. If it is (here, check externa! com- 
ponents for brealcdown under load. The 
best way to do that is by replacing them. 
As 1 said, we've been getting too many 
letters about this oddball problem to 
ignore if. I thought this little run-through 
might be of some help. 1 certainly hope it 
wilL and wish you good luck. R-E 

SERVICE 
QUESTIONS 

HORIZONTAL OSCILLATOR 
PROBLEM 

I wrote you about a problem jn a Sylva- 
nia A- 12 — the horizontal oscillator 
wouldn't start. Well, after quite a bit of 
trouble 1 final Iv found the solution. I re- 
placed the FET (part No. LV28654-5, 
new part No. 1 3-4 .'^l 12-1). What they 
don't tell you is that the pinottl of the new 
part is different from that of the old one, 
so watch out I I would also suggest that 
capacitors C410, C414, and C416 be 
changed. 

Thanks lo Ray Green of Camden, AR. 
'That's ihe kind of feedback that can he a 
1(1! of help U> ihe resi of us. 

HEAT-SHRINK HINT 

I have a hint for shrinking heat- 
sensitive tubing in light or enclosed 
places. I wrap a few turns of '/s-inch cop- 
per tubing around the barrel of a pencil- 
type soldering iron, slip about an inch of 
Teflon tubing over the top of the copper, 
and then slip rubber tubing over the Tef- 
lon. When you blow into the mbber tub- 
ing, your breath is heated as it passes 
through the hot copper. You can easily 
direct a stream of hot air into tight places 
using this method, 1 used an old iron with 
a broken tip that was tio longer any good 
for soldering. 

That xoumls like a vety good trick. 
Tlianks ro Jame.s Bohn afFlc>ri.\xaiit. MO 
for that hint. 

RETRACE PROBLEM 
Vve got a terrible retrace problem in a 
Zenith 14A9C50. Nothing I can find seems 
to be bad, but the retrace lines are there, 
and they are bright enough to upset the 
customer. Help! — S.H., Irmo, SC. 

I told liim to check this and that, and as 
a last resort, to check the setting of the 
CRT screen controls. If they are too high, 
you'll get retrace lines. That tuiTied out to 
be his prnblem. In older sets, those con- 
trols should be checked as a matter of 
coursc^they are too ea.sy to get at and 
■twiddle," 

INTERMITTENT PICTURE 
The picture on this Zenith Sy.steni J 
went hiank intermittently, but the sound 
was OK. ill though a bit hashy. Changing 
channels or turning the set off and on 
would sonitimcs bring the picture back. 



^o wonder they call it the SUPERFONEl 

At Last » a Cordless Phone 
with TWICE the Range, Sound 
Fidelity to Rival Phones 
Cords, and a Privaqf Code 
System^ All This in a Phone 
Less Than an Inch Thick! 

The Super Fone ii less than 1" ifikk. The hme unit has a buUl-in speaker phone, 
a fully indepeijdeni intercom and is 110 voll-220 voh switchahle. 



Until now, cordless phones have 
^en you wonderful convenience. But 
ihey've had two problems; 

1 . The range is limited to 600 to 700 
feet. 

2. Some of them sound as though 
you're talking inside a barrel. 

As cordless phones have become 
enormously popular, another problem 
has arisen: two people, living near each 
other, can have the same channel. Not 
only is there line confusion, but someone 
else can literally make a long distance call 
on your phone. 

No more. Never again. 

Range: 1500 Feet OR MOREI 

The SuperFone 650 uses state-of- 
the-art electronics to bring you the 
ultimate cordless phone. Sound quality is 
superb — and it stays superb, 1 500 feet or 
more from the base station. That's more 
than tvrice the distance of standard 
cordless phones. 

Only SuperFone 650 has a secret 
code system to prevent interference and 
false operation of the phone. You choose 
from 512 possible "code" combinations. 
Etoth the base unit and the phone are 
locked onto that code, which you can 
change when you want to. 

No other phone can interfere. No 
other unit can share the signal. No one 
else can hear or speak on your earner- 
wave. 

Enormous Range 

We say the SuperFone 650 has a 
range of 1500 feet. 

Notice we didn't say "up to" or "as far 
as" 1500 feet. There's no hedging, 
because this seems to be the minimum, 
not the maximum range. 

Users report 1800 and 2000 feet. 
That's nearly hcJf a mile. SuperFone 650 is 
a radiophone, not a toy, and that's why its 
signal doesn't break up or start hissing or 
crackling when you get half a block away. 

'you can tell when you heft it. It's a 
little Giant. You can feel the power inside. 
What a marvel of electronic engineering it 
is! And it's tough, too. It fits into your shirt 
pocket, and you can bounce it around all 
day without damaging it, 

Speakerplione, Intercom — 
EveiYthittgl 

SuperFone 650 is The Everything 
Phone, Anything any phone can do, it cap 
do. 



First, the base station is a speaker 
phone. Touch a button and you can have 
a hands-free conference conversation in 
the room in which _lhe base station sits. 

Next, it's an intercom. You can page 
the handset from the base unit and have a 
private conversation. 'Vou have a true 
wkeiess intercom, not just a signal. 

Third, you have a privacy button. 
Push that button and you'll still be able to 
hear anything the other party says, but he 
or she won't be able to hear you until you 
take the button off "hold." 

Fourth, you have an automatic rediai. 
Touch the key and the SuperFone will 
rediai the last complete number. 

What else? A security switch which 
makes it impossible for anyone to call out 
on the remote phone, without changing 
the ability to receive calls. A volume 
control for the speaker on the base unit. A 
cafl button to page the base from the 
cordless phone. THIS PHONE HAS 
EVERYTHING! 

30-Second Installation 

Plug your SuperFone 650 into any 
WciU AC outlet. Push its standard modular 
terminal into the telephone plug. You're in 
business. 

Every component is heavy-duty, 
from the built-in condenser microphone 
(™th automatic gain control) to the LED 
indicator lights. This. phone is designed for 
hard use. 

The SuperFone 650 is yours for 
$249.95. If you want the SuperAntenna 
™th it, giving you a range of a mile ^ or 
even more — you can have both for 
$319.95. (Or you can get the Super- 
Antenna alone for $79.95.) 

We Af>soIiftety Guarantee! 

Use the SuperFone 650 (or any 
electronic instrument you acquire from 
us) for up to 30 days. If for any reason you 
decide not to keep it, return it for a 100% 
refund. 

The SuperFone 650 — $249.95 
The SuperAntenna ~ S79.95 
BOTH Phone and Antenna — 
$319.95 

SupeRange 3!^ mile phone or 
SupeRange with 8- mile Super- 
Extender unit - write for information, 
(This phone for export only). 
Adapter for Multi-line telephone — 
$39.95 
Add $4,50 f)er total order for shipping. 




For Export Only — 

THE MOST POWERFUL 

PHONE OF AU TIME — 

3>/2 TO 8 BAILE RANGE! 

The SttpcSan^c phone is so 
powerftil we're authorized to sell it for 
export only. 

This phone operates clearly, up to 
316 miles from the base station. Add the 
SopcrExtender unit and the range goes 
up to an incredible 8 miles. 

Write for information about this 
remarkable instrument. 



TRIPLE THE RANGE 
OF ANY CORDLESS PHONE! 

The SttpecAntemta will give your 
cordless phone, rejanOeis of make or 

mode!, three times the range it has now.j 
If the range is 7(X) feet, it'll leap to' 

over 2,000. If it's 1500 feet, it couJd be as 

far as one mile! 

Easy to install. Only $79,95 

complete. Add $4.50 for shipping. 




For instant service, if you have a VISA 

or MasterCard, call toll-fi'ee 24 hours 

a day, seven days a week: 

1-800-227-1617 

Ask far Operator 1 10 
(in California, call 1-800-772-354 51 

The SuperFone 650, SuperAntenna, and 

SupeRange phone are more electronic 

marvels from 

new HORizoMS 

Dep(.RE-5/ 245 Fifth Ave. 
New; York, NY 10016 



Also, sometimes il would come back by 
itseir, I suspected (Ue Chroma- 
LumitiatKe module, but die pmbiem real- 
ly could be anywhere. You suggested 
some things to try, including lightly tapp- 
ing stages. 

1 found that the picture could always be 
restored by a tap on the shield over video 
amplifiers Q 1 22fi and Q 1227. Our Zenith 
distributer supplied a new circuit board 
without charge (after a letter from Zenith 
Customer Service. Chicago). The new 
bfiard is 9- 1 5 1 -03C — the same number as 
ihc original, but with a "C" suffix in- 
stead of the original "A." The difference 
is that the shield on this one is soldered 
in.'itead of pressed on. Also, there's no 
?:ero-caiTier adjust as there was on the old 
one. That control might have been the 
faulty part. 1 hope this will help others 
who run into this problem. 

/; tirialnly iiv7/. Thanks laJ.H. Stmon 
nfCtitnim-, AR for the feedhcick, 

COMPUTERS NOW! 

I've got a TRS-80 microcomputer with 
an intermittent video output. Ttie screen 
goes dark, but ttie computer still works 
and f/ie printer output is normal. The com- 
puter technician hasn't found the problem 
yet.~E,L.G., Merritt Island, FL 

Wheel Now \' m a c o in p u t e r 
technician — and I know nothing about 
them. However. 1 do know how to find 



out why a picture tube goes dark. 

Check all of the things around the CRT 
such a.s high voltage, all the DC voltages 
on the base, and the socket contacts. Loss 
of high voltage will cause your problem, 
a.s will incorrect bias and interniittant 
socket contacts. You may have to monitor 
some of those voltages to find out which 
one chajiges when cutoff occurs — but one 
of them does! Check and log all DC vol- 
tages while the monitor is working, and 
then recheck them when the fault shows 
up. 

MUSIC-AMP DISTORTION 
1 asked you about distortion in a Poly- 
tone musical amplifier. Your siLggestion 
for checking pin 9 (the feedback pin for 
distortion correction) of the LM-.^91 IC 
was the clue. An open resistor, R20, be- 
tween pin 9 and the emitter of the 92PU07 
transistor was the cause of the distortion. 
By the way. there's a mistake in the 
diagram — pin 16 is B -I- and pin 1 1 goes 
to the junction of RIO and R9. C.F. 

TUNER PROBLEM 

This GE 25YM1£ had no sound and no 
video, and the tuning voltage on the con- 
trol assembly was a constant .30 volts on 
all channels, instead of the nonnal 1-25 
volts. I replaced the PLL iC a.s the service 
manual said, but with no succes.s, I re- 
placed both the tuning-control a.ssembly. 



EP93X168, and the wtcieband amp with 
an EP93X289 tuning assembly. That 
fixed it. 

Thanks lo David E. Linv of Astoria , IL 
for that hint. One of these days we'll get 
into the problem of those tuners and their 
repair. More and more of them are show- 
ing tip, 

MORE ODD TUBES 

/ need a SDL4 tube, but can 't find one 
anywhere. Do you have ideas?— T.M., 
Spring, TX 

Try Transeleieronic, 1 365 39th Street, 
Brooklyn. NY 11218. 

f Feedback: Thanks! They saidlhey had 
30 of them in stack, and they shipped four 
of them to me quickly.} 

SYNC PROBLEM 

I've got a dandy in a Magnavox T8-9 
chassis. There are four or five vertical 
lines in the picture with ringing at the 
top~-they look like upside-down Christ- 
mas tress! I'm lost.—D.A., Babbit, MN 

The ringing at the top of the picture is 
due to horizontal instability. I'd say that 
that could be due to "something" getting 
into the horizontal sync. That can come 
from an open filter or bypass capacitor 
that is letting pulses get into the sync. Use 
a scope to check the DC supplies to the 
sync separator and horizontal oscillator. 
Check the composite sync to see if the 



CO 
O 
z 

o 
cc 

I- 
o 
m 



O 

Q 

< 

cc 

98 



THIS CATALOG IS YOUR KEY TO 

INCREASED EFFICIENCY AND 

PRODUCTIVITY. AND BECAUSE IT'S 

FREE, YOU'VE ALREADY STARTED 

TO REDUCE COSTS! 

This is our current 
catalog... The Wire 
Handlers. It's hlled 
with wire handling 
tools designed and 
engineered to make 
your life easier. The 
tools are unique. . . 
unique in design, 
and unique in the 
way they perform. 

You may know 

about our Wire 

Strippers... but 

we also offer the 

finest power electric 

desoldering tools, termination kits, 

wire and cable cutters, slitters, crimpers, and law cost 

voltage testers, available. Ask for your copy of The Wire 

Handlers today! Just send your business card. 

^PALADIN 

M CORPORATION 

Suite IDS, 3133S Via Colinas, Westlake Village, CA 91362 
Call [213)991-4970. 




CIRCLE 93 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




CIRCLE SS ON FREE INFORMATION CARIi 





rv£\£V2rt7'^ ^ J2 WASHERS 
pHJ^ 31 SPACERS 

*=^ MOUNTING BRACKET 

6" RG 174 COAX 
P CONNECTOR • 35" ROD 
'/2" X 4" P.V.C. PIPE 
DRILLED END CAPS • HARDWARE 




2300 MHz VARIABLE DOWNCONVERTER 

ANTENNA KIT .<xj:\£V?X PARTS CONVERTER 

Converter P.C. Board 

Plated through holes 

for stability $4.95 

Power Supply 

P.C. Board 2.95 

MRF 901 2.00 

NE02135 ...4.95 

2835 Diodes 95 

.001 Chip 

Caps 10/3.95 

Choke Set of 4 1.95 

LM 317 Regulator 1.25 
'F' Connectors 

Chassis 50 

Wall Transformer 

12 VAC 700 MA....4.95 

'U' Bolt 95 

BALUN 

75 to 300 ohm 1.95 

BALUN 

for rabbit ears....2.95 
*RG 59/ U COAX 

WITH CONNECTORS 
FACTORY MADE 

100 Ft, 117.50 

50 Ft. 9,50 

25 Ft. 5,75 

3 Ft. 2.50 



POWER SUPPLY 




POWER TRANSFORMER 
COURSE TUNE POT. 
FINE TUNE POT. 
3 'P CONNECTORS 
RESISTORS & CAPS 
LED WITH HOLDER 
TERMINAL STRIP 



P.C. BOARD 

RF CHOKE 

KNOB 

WIRE 

2 SWITCHES 

4 DIODES 

LM 317 REG. 



WOOD GRAIN CABINET WITH SILK 
SCREENED front and back $10.35 Extra 

BUILT POWER SUPPLY, $34.95 



Complete 

Down Converter 

System 

INCLUDES 

ANTENNA KIT 

POWER SUPPLY KIT 

CONVERTER KIT 

SPECIAL $49.95 



QUANTITY 

DISCOUNTS 

Any Price in Adv. 

10 tics. 12% off 

25 pes, la% o(f 

50 PCS. 25% oft 

100 PCS. 30% oH 

1000 pes 35% off 

titt Ktmng for 
Quantity Discount 



P.C. BOARD PRE-DRILLED 
SOLDER PLATED WITH 
PLATED THROUGH HOLES 
FOR A MORE STABLE PIC- 
TURE. Mei^ ■" 

.... •z/ST^oTT-eow^.., 

3 -MRf-^ei-flWrt^SfSTOR — 
2 HP 2835 Diodes 

6 .001 Chip Caps. 

9 Resistors 

4 Prewound chokes 
1 Electrolytic Cap. 
1 Pre Made Probe 



• WIRED P.C. BOARD TEST- 
ED, READY TO CONNECT TO 
CAN WITH PROBE & CABLE 
CONNECTOR ATTACHED. 
$24.95 



We will tune conver- 
ter board for $12.50 
trouble shoot 

add 7.50 

trouble shoot 
power supply, $12. 50 

plus any ptrts need«d. 



We will accept telephone orders for Visa & Mastercard 
No C.0.0. Orders 

To Order Call 800-428-3500 317-291-7262 

Coinplete Kit Weighs 10 piiunds. Please add Suffii:iem Postage 

6254 La Pas Trail 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46268 



ELECTROniC 
RRinBOUl f 



SATELLITE TELEVISION RECEIVER 




KITS 



The Electronic Rainbow Receiver consists of a receiver 
with an external down-converter tbat mounts at the 
antenna, feeds the voltage to the LNA through the coax 
cable. The 4GKz signal is down converted to 70 MHz 
and is fed through the RG59/LJ coax to the receiver. 



Rainbow Kits are supplicid with simple step by step in- 
structions. All the circuits that you need expensive test 
equipment to do are pre wired and tested. All printed 
circuit boards have the outline of each part printed on 
them. 



RECEIVER FEATURES 

Built in RF modulator • Detent 
Tuning-3.7 to 4.2 GHz • Variable 
Audio-5.5 to 7.5 MHz • Invert Video 
• Channel Scan • Voltage monitor- 
ing* Meter output • Remote Tuning 
SPECIFICATIONS: 
Single Conversion Image Rejection 
Downconverter • Threshold 8 db 
CNR • IF Bandwidth 24MH2 • Gut- 
put IV Audio and Video • IF Fre- 
quency 70IV1HZ • Video Bandwidth 
4.5MHz • Size 3V2"Hx8y2"DxnV4"W 



Complete Satellite TV Receiver 

KIT '1 — Contains: 

• Mainboard • Tuning Board • Down- 
converter Board " Modulator Board 

■ All parts needed to complete receiver 
Down Converter built in case. 
Cabinet, attractive black brushed ano- 
dized metal with silk screened front 
and back for a professional took 
70 MH2 Filter is pre-wired and tested. 
Complete instruction (tqnr nn 
Manual. ^J73.UU 



auatanteea 
to pfo-H 



We will accept telephone ordeis tor Visa jL Mastercard 
No C.O.D. Orders 

To Order Call bo(M28'35oo 317-291-7262 

Cam plate Kit Welglis 10 pounds. Please add SuHlcietit Postage 

6254 La Pas Trail 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46268 



KIT "2 — Board Kit Contains: 

• Main Board • Tuning Board • Down- 
converter board • Modulator Board 

• Parts List, assembly and alignment 
manual 

• 4GHz local oscillator and 70MHz filter 
is pre-wired and tested. d^lOQ flf) 



Instrtjction manual. Contains printed 
circui't board layouts, parts placement, 
and alignment instructions, d^nc AA 



ELECTROniC 

Rninnouj o 



> 



CIRCLE 45 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



is: 



problem shows up there. 

Check the horizontal oscillator/driver 
module and especially the sync input to 
that module. Also. it"s possible that some 
kind of poor contact on the module itself 
could be causing your problem — a bad 
ground contact, perhaps, 

HINT ON TRIPLER 
I asked you a while ago about using an 
ECG523A tripler in this Curtis-Mathes 
CMC-51 chassis. You gave me some 
help. 1 found out that it could be done by 
taking the focus dropping-resistor out, 
and connecting the focus control from the 
new iripler directly to the focus lead from 
the CRT socket. I also connected the con- 



trol lead from the tripler directly to the 
focus control on the TV, thus eliminating 
the drops in the TV by using (presumably) 
u network inside the iripler. Thanks, it 
works fine. 

/ don' I iliiiik there is a dropping resis- 
tor ueiwork inside the tripler. If I'm not 
mistaken, tlie focus voltage is simply tap- 
ped ufftlie tripler at a point witere it's just 
alMiti right for that use. 

NOTE ON DERATING-RESISTORS 
CLINIC 

I read your Service Clinic on derating 
resistors (October 1982) and I agree with 
you, but a word of caution is in order. In 
certain circuits, a low-wattage resistor is 






Huntington's Disease Kills on and on and on an 



NATIONAL HUNTINGTON'S DISEASE ASSOCIATION 



TRYTELLING THESE PEOPLE 
THAT CANCER IS UNBEATABLE. 




CO 

z 
o 
tr 

h- 
O 
UJ 
_j 
liJ 

o 

< 



Everyone in this picture shares something in common. They've all had 
cancer, and are leading happy, normal lives. 

Though prc^re.ss in u-eatment, knowing the risks and early detection, 
over two million individuals have survived cancer. 

But most people don't know diat. They still think cancer is unbeatable. 

A fact which over two million people would like to dispute. 



^^AMffilCnN CANCER SOCIETY' 

< Ho\< wu live ma>- save yidir life. 



Thj$$paceconlnbuledasa public service- 



used as a protective device— for example, 
the small emitter-resistors in high-power 
transistor output stages. Those are meant 
to blow out, protecting the board and 
other parts. You'll find fusible resistors in 
other places, too. 

Thanks to Steven R. Eddington of 
Bloomington. IN for that note. Til go 
along with that Steve! You'll find places 
where resistors are deliberately low- rated 
for that purpose. However, if you use the 
one special tool that we should on all 
cases, those will be fairly obvious. That 
special tool is your headl 



NO RASTER, BUT PLENTY OF 
HIGH VOLTAGE 

In this Zenith 12A12C52, the high volt- 
age is a nice 29 KV. The horizontal oscilla- 
tor is running and all DC voltages are OK 
except for the boost, which is at about B + 
(450 volts}. The focus voltage at the CRT is 
OK, There 's no raster. What's going on 
here?—R.M.H., Norco, LA 

Well. 1 ran in circles for a while (not an 
unusual exercise for me) but it tin ally hit 
me. Your boost is low. Actually you have 
no boost at all, just B + . (What threw me 
me here was that that loss of boost usually 
reduces the high voltage quite a bit.) With 
no boost, the screen voltages on your 
CRT are going to be very low, and the 
picture tube wiil cut off. (2heck the dam- 
per, boost capacitor (it could be open). 
etc. R-E 



EQUIPMENT REPORTS 



continued from page 32 



shortwave listener who may have more 
than one radio, but is short on antennas. 
And. there is provision for connecting up 
to two antennas to the model 959. The 
antenna you want to use is front-panel 
switch selectable. 

Using the model 959 combination an- 
tenna tuner and preamp is easy. The in- 
struction pamphlet is clear and concise, 
so it should take no more than thirty 
minutes to have the unit up and working. 
One thing that we should note is the need 
of a good earth ground. That will prevent 
unwanted oscillation when the preamp is 
in use, 

.'^bout the only thing missing with this 
nearly plug-in-and-use-it tuner is a good 
theory e.xplanation in the instruction man- 
tial. Although there is some minimal- 
level theory included in the introduction. 
it still isn't enough for the technically 
inclined hobbyist. A schematic, howev- 
er, is included. 

Overall, the MFJ model 959 Receiver 
Tuner/Preamp should be a good addition 
to any shortwave listening hobbyist. Its 
ease of use and the extra potential it brings 
to your receiver is worth the asking price 
of S89.95. R-E 



100 



SWD-1 VIDEO CONVERTER 



FOR CABLE TV 

The SWD-1 VrdBo Convon^r it VH' \ 
iT*d on cabit TV lyscorrn te ce- 
move th* HHe'5 stgrid from a I 
disEarlad vldao (chflnfiHl 3 in/ I 
outf And aIid pill Ihfu IKd I 
ntirmnl undiiTodad/dQCD'Clad | 
BudiD iignal. Rackor switcli 
3pBraEin$ niDdi lo mmov* KHz'a I 
d(itor[jor>frornthitvld«ODrpa*SBll stHarchiO' 
neH no'rtntlly, Simpit ic usemble — len th«n 30 
iriinuTe^. Pre-tuned- Input/output Qiannflil 3. Impftdirice | 
7Sohms, tr7VAC. 
SWD-1 Video Converter Kit $69.95 I 



0-35d0 VARIABLE GAiN 

RF AMPLIFIER 

USES TWO REVOLUTIONARY 

NEW HYBRID 
BROADBAND AMPLIFIER ICs 

Works on all RF Signals from 4O-900IVIHz 

EXCELLENT FOR USE WITH: 

• All Antenna Systems 

• Voice Communications 
MATV Systems 
CCTV Systems 
Video RF Line Amplifiers 
Frequency Counters 
Oscilloscopes 
FM Broadcasts 

Uavi you can use one TV/FM Antenna to cover all cEosa and 
distant stations withixit experiencing overloadrng pfoblerrta. 
idsgl for outdoor and indoor usSr I/O impedance Is 75 ohms. 
Power Supply is separate cosk feed system which allows 
annplifier to be located anywhere in cable run. Power Supply 
has knob ID control varible gain. LED power on indicator and 
on/off switch. 
AiL-ZVG Wired and Tested S4a.9S 




Our New SIVA 14.5dB GAIN, 14 EL£MENT 
CORNER REFlfCTOR VAGI ANTENNA 




SlVil-] ViglliHiu.11.jeGHSllKU«ll7Sa3[nMm 

ctanrifio-ita sia.flj 

rm-4 Ywlli<nmi14i«C>iS*cWi7Siir]lfilKn 
i U-5! ttJ.JS 

ae-wu vsiiiiLHtiiiCiinCilit LiinrtL F-ncwCmcw. . t Jiu 

■MM Sfi«ii{ilPir7S-3«]riiinMil£hn)Ti]nili«ii)if S1.«5 n. 



AMATEUR — ETV 32 ELEMENT 



■ Nol * KIT 




• 1.9-2.5 GHl • 3IK' Llllll 

* 23 dB Avenge Gtin ■ Commrrtiil Gnde 
* Die C»t W^vpTBDf HQuilnii wild ^%" x ZVj" 
Am far EliEtraiici 
■ InckMjti P.C. PrahA, F-DT CoBiKdor ud MMetbtg Hitdtntt 
MAE-Z 32 Elemml YA6[ Aniwni S23.85 



Kam Sons' RegulatEil Varible DD Power Supply 

ht use wilti KSDC-KIT 1.9 - ^.BGHe Down Canveder. Cornpleldr atsemtlM 
witti Attncl^e Cabinet, TV/CaFTVEmr Mode Switch. FtequencY DDiitial ind 
W IndicalH 
Modil KSPS-IA Aueitilltod Ptmn Supptt SZ3.9B 



sreciAL 

PACiCAGE 
OFFER 



ORDER ALL THREE ITEMS 

. mE-2, KSK-KIt ini ST A 95 

f KSPS-U lur Oi*( m 

- cn-AI [^Btf S ME HOT WCtUOED — 



Switch to Bambf ! 



Electronically 



Bambi Electronic Video Switch ... 
mates switching of your VCR/VTR, 
Pay TV Decoders, Cable TV, Wdeo 
Discs, Video Games. Closed Circuil 
TV, Antennae and Microcomp* 



The BsiTini E l;;:v.:]'tic .Vj.^:] Switch ts an electronic comput- 
flrized switching network with rnemorv which can accept up 
to six drfferent sources of uideo signals end provide the flexi- 
bilitv of directing the inputs to any qt all of the three outputs. 

Now you can eliminate ... the drudgery of disconnecting and 
reconnecting your video equipment each time you use it ... 
[he tangled mess of oables which are impossible ta trece 

out ,., not being able to use more than one function 
at a time. 

Bambi lets you enjoy using your video equipment the 
way it should be ... electronically and on line at the 
push of 3 button. 



Y 



Model BEVS^l Cainpletalv Wired and 
Assembled. Includes comprehansivo Instil c- 

tiori/OperDtiDn Manual and DocaL Set for 
customicing ycur Video Switchi installeiion. 



129 



95 




Bambi'i front panal^M dosigiicd i^i:h eIia 
uiar 1n mind. Compu'ttf styltd cmniimcriori, 
wlch loFl^lQuch kflvtK^^rd jfited lor over tO 
million opemianB]. irrgngfd in instriK form 
ffltowi ffaiy input/outpuL B«tecttQn wiEhaut 
rafnrlnQ to chartn. Funclians iwlQctiid through 
Tho keyb^arti Bra immRdialaly disnlayed an 
l.ht« 1 8 LEO ilBluS indicatort. 




FREE 

Bambi 
Poster 

Wltll 

sny 
purchase 



Bambi' c Spocil^cstiansL 



0^ 0^^ &00 
©- "' '"■ " "" " "1 



♦ Inpui/ChrtpuE Imp-odsni-t; 75 D.ftn 

* SignfJ Lain ^dB ±1<fe 
« Nana ^cfQ ^l^g 

• InEMT-Rfliun* loft ISiJQ mm 

* I|4'la[i04^ €^1^9 mm. 

• Poww niq, 1 I TVAC 60 Hi, 2W 
■ filfliDiiiiDnt tOKWiiBHDxaMH 

• VV«idhl 4>t Ibl 




Check the qutUiv o4 B*Fnbi agvjnit thai of 
much hlohnr pricffd c^ompatition. All sotid 
stnEe flectrontc gwitcKing provides low «tten- 
uiilian |3dB], wide f requencTy reapcmse [40- 
aSQ MHz], and axcfllient isolation belwcen 
signal sounGBi {sach I/O seclion JndfVidyalLy 
shoid^i:] f«r 65dB min. iscrlatkOnf. 




AiSflnnbh^ 
TtiTrti 

AppfOKimjitafy 
S Mlnutai, 



MODULATOR 

Not a Game Type Modulatof 

_The MPS'! Kil contftrts Vidoa/Auilio 
Signals TO a cr^taL contraJIcd RF 
output lot TV Ghannals 3 and 4. 
The MPS-I Modulalor's adjust- 
able inpuiis are desrgned to malch 
all TV Cameras and VC Hs and iflalures a . 
vofisge regulated povl^e^5lJpp^'. power swfich 
and LED indicator. No Turning Required. Opersles 
ofi 1 17VAC. [dea[ for use wilh our new DetrbEe 
CCTV-1 and revised Bamtn GEVS-l S, 
MPS-I Modulator Kit $39.95 



SEE PACKAGE OFFER BELOW FOR ANTENNA, 
DOWN CONVERTER, POWER SUPPtY, & RF AMP, 



Kato Sons' Dawn Converter Kit •1.9 - 2,5GHz:^ 

Ostigiied Fw SJrnph Simon by faiTTiEF Japan«^ DQ Acnateut Magazine'! WT 
it^t/En^mtK. Unit uliUK new ingMuaus Prifii«t Circuii: Prabe fof mpxitnum 
gain. Ci.ruiFt Inaiil Fits wadt MAE-2 mmm hguElng, Rn;u^ (nechanicoj 
asscmbN i^nly. AD eJectronts ati prB-saldHtd and pra-iasted. Li-sabia up ta 
^i^axinulKtv T5 mln 
Model KSOC-KIT 1 3 - 2.bGHi Down Cvnwte KK ...... . $34 3S 

A^ Sons' RF Amplifier •ZZdB Galnit 

Hiyh qinl^2 ilags taw notsia RFAmi^ilin lor 1.9 ID Z.SGKt. Uiut i^qutres aprox- 
ii^itiolv iD niiniilei assHcibhy. Ftis in same Kuising wilh down CDtncnif. Cava^ 
dillancK ijT up tD 3C iniWs 
Modal KSRF'2 RF ^plikr S23.95 



BE SECURE WITH BAMBI! 

Bambi Now Provides Home/Industrial 
Security With The New ... 

Autamatic Sequential Scanning BEVS-1S 

That's right' In addition to Bamb^s regular feaiures Jisted 
above, we have added Autoscanning with a contrqliecl l-lO 
second Vanble Delay Cor up to sk input security umerss. 

The BEVS-1 S atlovn iimu Itarwoui recording Oin .tVCfl wiiilfi otnervin'O Kl'Wity 
on lihe monitor, ManuaUocK-CHiot'iTtvafieoFsixinFHfti un^JoKCampJishcd a1 
any iime. 'The SEVS-I S coupled with our riffw OiAbw CCTV'1 iiatsd ticlow 
np.Dlfei an c^ceManr jccunti^ «ytle/n for vour tlnme or BusmcK 
BEVS-lS Sequ&nEieJ Scenning ^lecErontc Videc Switch. . . $'199.95 



SPECIAL 

PACKAGE 
OFFER 



ORDER ALL FOUR ITEMS 

' ml KSRF-Z fir [lll»f 94 

nqula. p.n il Hdm) icpnutr S idS.St] 
— mm C«BIES «ltE NIIT mCtUDED - 



* PWD 



FOR DETAILS SEE 
OUR PAST ADS 



• SPECIAL 
$109.95 



WHITE FOR OUR CATALOG OF 
ADDITIONAL CCTV ACCESSORIES 



SIMPLE SIMON ELECTRONIC KITS^ Inc. 

3871 S, Valley View, Suite 12, Dept. R, Les Vagas. IMV 89103 
In Neuado Call: 702"O71 "2832 

1-8CX)-782-3716 



KID I OR MCH 9 Ui \THJr 
WRITE FOB 

auAHrkrr DISCOUNTS 



O^Jtside Wcvada Call: 



Av.^iJijtjlQ by fUdil Ordor Onty 
Send Check" or Money Order. Minimum 
Order: SVB.95. Add 10% Shipping and 

Handling of^ orders under $40.00. For 
orders Over S40.00, add 5%, Minimum 
Shipping and Handling S2.00. Cot. $1.00 

— VISA and Mastercard Acceptable — 
*ChBcV; ord»r^ wiii be iBirf '^0 riar^' tjoloic! ihippinfl 



You ShQulH Have Debbie's'" Qualityl 




Debbie 
CCTV-1 

CLOSED 
CinCUiT 
TtLEWiSION 
CAMEftA 



EJtcellent For Use In Home or Business Security 
Systems. Monitoring Production Lines. Childrens 
Play Areas, Etc. 
features: 

• 2.1^3" ESectrotTatic Focus-in g Vidicon Tube 

■ EtA B25 Line. 60 Fiolt^ Per Sec Stanrting System 

• ■GOO Line at Center Horijonlal Resolutfon 

■ 1 FchOtcandlQ Minimum ElluiminBticin 

• I0,i300io 1 Aijtomalic Lighl Control Flange 

• 1 .QVpp Composiift. Negative Sync. 75 Ohm Vndeo Output 
» 40dB Signal to Noise Ratio 

• Slandard "C Lens Mount 

• 1 TOV ±10%. 50-60 Hr, 9 Watts 

Debbie CCTV'1 Require* C-rvtount Lfirw... £159.35 

16mnn, F1.G Hi'RasBlutiun tens w/Cap 1 9,9& 

Mounting Brnckvt ReKible.. Locktng<. SGCT" Gooswieck lor use in 
■ceilrng ot wall mounllng 12.95 

NO^E WheiiuimQirM] OcbbwCCfJ'-l withBoimbi BEVS'15. >nfl:F MpdulftoriMch 



MODEL IC-1 INFftARED CONVERTER 

Adapts Eoany vid&Q camura. Rec^uC&scnE'rc^yco^lsfDf night vi ow- 
ing iyif 60%. Video lopn in th& d.-trk without being detected. 
Excellent for • Faciory H rounds SiituriTy • Home Survtillence. 
Write fai" Details. 



> 

-< 

CD 



101 



Electronles 



[m]DDt]D°/^E 





CALL NOW 
AND 

RESERVE 
YOUR SPACE 



6 ■ rate $550 per each insertion. 

Reaches 220.500 readers. 

Fast reader service cycle 

Short lead time for the placement of 

ads. 

We typeset and layout the ad at no 

additional charge. 



Call 212-777-6400 to reserve space. 
Ask for Arlme Fishman. Limited num- 
ber of pages available. Mail materials 
to: mini-ADS RADIO-ELECTRONICS, 
200 Park Ave South tMew York. NY 
10003. 



o 

o 
□: 

1- 
o 

LU 
_l 

tu 

O 
Q 
< 
CL 

102 




UNGAR'S NEW SOLDERlhJG (RON for 

technicians and hobbyists features unique, 
long lasting THERMO-DURIC heater for fast 
heat-up. The CM25 has an integral nickel- 
plated cone tip {750°F) for use with both small 
or large connections. Handle design is roll 
resistant, slim, coo! and comfortable. $8.50. 
See your Ungar distributor, or write UNCiAR, 
Division of Eldon Ind., Inc., P.O. Box 6005, 
Compton, CA 90220. 
CIRCLE 114 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



mpr 




^^ 


W /I 


^ 





WIRELESS & ELECTRICAL CYCLO- 
PEDIA. Originally printed in 1918. this 176- 
page reprint of the complete catalog gives 
you an accurate look at the state of electron- 
ics in 1918. Contains everything from a Zinc 
Spark Gap to a 1000-Mile Receiving Outfit. 
You can get your own copy of this modern 
antique, profusely illustrated, for only S4.95 
plus $1.00 P&H. Order yours from R-E 
BOOKSTORE, Radio-Electronics, 200 
Park Avenue, South, New York, NY 10003. 




THE MEAN LITTtE KIT New compact kit of 
electronic tools. Includes 7 screwdrivers, 
adjustable wrench, 2 pair pliers, wire stripper, 
knife, alignment tool, stainless mle, hex-key 
set, scissors. 2-flexible files, burnisher, 
soldehng iron, solder aid, solder and de- 
soldering braid. Highest quality padded zip- 
per case. Send check or charge Bank- 
Americard, Ivlastercarge, or American Ex- 
press. The JTK-6 sells for $95.00— JENSEN 
TOOLS INC., 781 5 S. 46tti Street, Phoenix, 
Arizona 85040, (602) 968-6231. 
CIRCLE 11 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




HI TECH CASSETTES. Now on 2 hour color 
video tapes 'Learn how to improve your tv 
picture plus receive weak UHF-VHF station 
snow free. Detailed step by step instructions 
in the art of distance tv signal reception. — 
$29.95, Satellite TV— $29.95, Audio cassette 
version S14.95 each. Beta or VHS, Visa- 
Mastercard, Dealers Welcome. DX TELE 
LABS, 3822 N. Paradise Rd., Flagstaff, Az. 
86001, 602-774-4735. 
CIRCLE 112 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




TELEVISION MODULE includes VHF. UHF, 
and CABLE-TV TUNERS, IF AMPLIFIER, 
VIDEO DETECTOR, SOUND DETECTOR 
and AMPLIFIER, and SYNC PROCESSOR: 
585,00. TELEVISIOr^ SIGNAL PROCESS- 
ING MANUAL explores standard and non- 
standard television: $1 5,95. Add 5% handling 
and shipping. Catalog S2.00. Visa and MO 
accepted. ORDER DESK (415) 439-7470. 
ABEX, P.O. BOX 26601 -RZ, SAN FRAN- 
CISCO, CA 94126. 
CIRCLE 111 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




APPLIANCE REPAIR HANDBOOKS— 13 
volumes by service experts; easy-to- 
understand diagrams, illustrations. For major 
appliances (air conditioners, refrigerators, 
washers, dryers, microwaves, etc.), elec, 
housewares, personal-care appliances. 
Basics of solid state, setting up shop, test 
instruments. $3.65 to S4.90 each. Free 
brochure. APPLIANCE SERVICE, PO Box 
789, Lombard, IL60148. 1-(312) 932-9550. 
CIRCLE 14 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Eleelranics. MUM 





TELTONE DTMF RECEIVERS TURN 
PHONES INTO CONTROL DEVICES and let 

you turn the phone system into a control net- 
work. They outperform other receivers in 
noisy environments and operate over a wide 
dynamic range. Three DTMF kits are avail- 
able: TRK-956 ft! $22.75 decodes DTMF. 
The TRK-947 fu $53.00 has built-in dial-tone 
and noise filtering. For both rotary and DTMF, 
order the TRK-927 (a $75.00. Kits include a 
3.58 IvIHz crystal and a DiP socket. To order 
call: (800) 227-3800 ext 1130 (In CA, (800) 
792-0990 ext 1130). 
CIRCLE 115 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



mil 



o, 



POWER LINE PROBLEMS? SPIKE- 
SP1KER THE SOLUTION! Clean up equip- 
ment damaging voltage spikes and con- 
ducted RF noise. Surge protection & RFl 
hash filtering. All units 120V. 15A. Deluxe 
Console 8 outlets $79.95, Quad Plug-In 4 
outlets S59.95, Mini Plug-In 2 outlets S44.95. 
VISA. MC. or check we pay UPS. COD's add 
S3. 00 plus UPS. Pa. residents add 6% sales 
tax. KALGLO. 6584 Ruch Road, Dept. RE, 
Bethlehem, PA 18017 (215) 837-0700, 
(800) 523-9685. TWX 510-651-2101. 
CIRCUe too ON FREE INFORIWATION CARD 




SOLDERING STATION FOR LESS Front 

display of tip temperature, adjustable tem- 
perature 200°F to 900^F, UL listed, low cur- 
rent leakage, high insulation. Complete as 
shown. 7 tips available, also takes standard 
tips, ORDER MODEL 81-XY 168. S79.95 
plus shipping. To order call toll free: (BOO) 
423-5336 In California (800) 382-3663, Or 
send $79.95 (California residents add sales 
tax) plus $5.00, shipping to ORA ELEC- 
TRONICS DEPT. RE, 18215 Parthenia St., 
North ridge, CA 91325 (213) 701-5648. 
CIRCLE 15 ON FREE INFORfflATIOM CARD 






COVER STORY AUDIO KITS from Radio 
Electronics 5-6 78. 2 80 and 3-4 81 . Our S89 
Graphic Equalizer (,02% THD, 12 bands, 
92dB SN), S40 PLM-1. and $120 ASRU 
(Noise Filter Expander increases dynamic 
range by 18dB) are attractive, excellent per- 
formers. Free shipping vi/ith prepaid orders. 
Free catalog with lots more. SYMMETRIC 
SOUND SYSTEMS, 856J Lynn Rose Ct., 
Santa Rosa, CA 95404. 

CIRCLE 10 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



jigj3-^-^ 



m.mi 




MODERN ELECTRICS. Miniature souvenir 
of the first publication ever produced by Gems- 
back Publications. This issue appeared in 
April 1908 — just 75 years ago. You can own 
your own reprint of this unique first edition for 
just $2.50 plus 75e P&H. It's available from 
R-E BOOKSTORE, Radio-Electronics, 200 
Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10003 



ULTIMATE UHF FRINGE AREA RECEP- 
TION. The system includes a 114 element 
antenna, 39db LNA (booster), a match 
maker -I- signal extrator for SI 99.95. Com- 
plete documentation and return policy if not 
satisfied. Also 2 hour VIDEO TAPES on how 
to receive snow-free UHF-VHF pictures— 
$29,95. VHS or Beta. Vis a' Mastercard, Deal- 
ers welcome. Specify channels. DX TELE 
LABS, 3822 N. Paradise Rd.. Flagslafl, AZ. 
86001,602-774-4735. 
CIRCLE 113 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




MAGNIFIER LAMP FOR LESS All metal 
construction, UL approved 5", 3 x magnifier, 
22 watt fluorescent circline lamp. 45" arm 
reach, heavy duty clamp mount. Only $59.95 
plus shipping. (California residents add sales 
tax,) To order call (800) 423-5336. In Califor- 
nia, (800) 382-3663 or send $59.95 plus 
$5.00 shipping to ORA ELECTRONICS, 
1 821 5 Parthenia St., Northridge, CA 91325 
(213) 701-5848. 

CIRCLE 19 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



^--, 



A,,,% 



$99.50 PRICE BREAKTHROUGH. Aniateur 
hi-gain commercial grade microwave TV sys- 
tem converts 2.1 - 2.6 GHz signal (or your 
home T.V. Assembled and tested. Minimal 
wind loading. (A problem with dish type.) 
Complete with antenna base, 26 element di- 
rector rod. power supply. 40' & 3' co-ax 
cables and hardware. ONLY S99.50 F.O.B. 
OEM DISTRIBUTING CO., 9748 Jamach 
Blvd., Spring Valley, CA 92077. Dealers 
phone (619) 698-OEMO for quantity 
prices. 
CIRCLE 20 ON FREE II^FORMATION CARD 




QUALITY TOOLS AT HALF PRICE! Sunnex 
manufactures a wide range of high precision, 
box joint cutters and pliers for the electronics 
industry. Sunnex only sells direct and can 
offer you quality tools at the most competitive 
prices. A HALF PRICE INTRODUCTORY 
OFFER will be enclosed with the catalog 
SUNNEX INC., 87 Crescent Rd., Needham, 
MA 02194, Phone 1-800-225-8480 (in MA 
617-444-4730). 
CIRCLE 21 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



> 

-< 

103 



SAVE! 

MONEY • TIME • FREIGHT 

^ QUALITY STEREO EQUIPMENT 
AT LOWEST PRICES. 

tYOUR REQUEST FOR QUOTA- 
' TION RETURNED SAME DAY 

Hr FACTORY SEALED CARTONS— 

~ GUARANTEED AND INSURED. 

L- SAVE ON NAME 8RANDS LIKE: 



PIONEER 


JVC 


KEMWOOO 


TEAC 


MARANTZ 


SANSUI 


TECHNICS 


SONY 



AND MORE THAN SO OTHERS 

BUY THE MODERN WAY 

BY MAIL-FROM 

EQ 

llllllM/ QUdiO 

BANK CARDS ACCEPTED 

12 East Delaware 

Chicago, Illinois 60611 

312-664-0020 
800-621-8042 

CIRCLE 94 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 






LONG 

PLAY 






<c\<fi °A \o ^^ ,;.■>» 








IQ^ CIRCLE 9 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



MUSIC SYNTHESIZERS 



cvunnned from pcii^c 6<S' 



ADSR generators have been most pop- 
ular among professional musicians. It is 
t'clt that that generator — which provides 
control over the attack time, decay time, 
sustain level, and release time — is the 
minimum required to imitate traditional 
instruments. ADSR-type generators re- 
quire both gate and trigger signals. 

Unlike the other modules that we have 
discussed, the envelope generator is not 
an audio module: it is a logic module. The 
output, though analog in nature, must re- 
spond to a number of digital conditions, 
(is the gate present? Is the trigger present? 
Are both present?) Envelope-generator 
logic hasn't changed over many years; 
only the means of implementing the logic 
has changed. For example, early units 
were discrete and were composed mainly 
of diodes, transistors, and various R-C 
networks. Later, many units were de- 
signed using TTL integrated circuits. Re- 
cently many designs have been appearing 
that incorporate CMOS-type circuits. 
Kinally. within the last several years a 
number of LSI circuits have appeared that 
incorporate the entire ADSR envelope 
senerator on one chip. Some examples 
are the SSM 2050 and 2055 by Solid State 
Micro Technology, and the 3310 from 
Curtis, Those LSI versions are especially 
attractive for computer-controlled syn- 
thesizers where many ADSR's (perhaps 
as many as 32) are required in one unit. 

The use of one-lC envelope generators 
cannot really be justified (except for the 
computer controlled synthesizers men- 
tioned above) because of the relatively 
high cost of the units. Single-iC envelope 
generators still cost seven or eight dollars 
apiece. In contrast, the circuit in Fig. 5 
(which uses about two-dollars-worth of 
IC's) accomplishes the same thing — it 
provides complete control over the 
atlack, decay, sustain, and release por- 
tions of the envelope. In addition, it al- 
lows for rctriggering. That means that if 
the gate is still presem and the waveform 
is in the sustain portion of its curve, a new 
trigger will initiate the attack cycle once 
again. 

While there is no doubt that use of LSI 
technology can make the designer's work 
much simpler in regard to VCO's, 
VCF's, and VGA's, it appears that, for 
now, the use of standard components is 
much more cost-effective in the design of 
ADSR's. 

We have barely touched the four main 
synthesizer-components, and there are 
many other types of modules available 
such as balanced "ring" modulators, 
echo units, sequencers, sample-and-hold 
units, etc. Those other types of modules 
have also been affected by advances in 
LSI technology, bringing parts counts 
and prices down to a minimum. R-E 



SEE YOUR DEALER TODAY 



FROM 




rirestK'. 

'ANTENNAS' 
■ ACCESSOR I EM- 



HERE'S A TIP 
THAT'S PERFECT! 



AM/FM AUTO RADIO 



U 



ANDCB 

'Firestilc'n 

GOLDEN SERIES 

BARE-HANDS TUNABLE 

■NO TOOLS NEEDED' 

HIGH PERFORMANCE ANTENNAS 



ALSO ANTENNAS FOR 

CORDLESS TELEPHONES 

MONITOR SCANNERS 

Oealar & Distributor Inquiries Invited 
SEND FOR FREE CATALOG 

Flranlli' minnni Compiir) 
jeu East Adams'Phoeran. AZasOM 



Namfl. 
SIrmi . 

Crty — 



. Zip_ 



Sirvlng tht CB intl 
tlemntunlcitlORt Miikil SInt* 1902. 



5- YEAR REPLACEMENT WARRANTY 



CIRCLE 8 ON FHEE INFORMATION CARD 



CABLE TV 
CONVERTERS 

VIDEO 
ACCESSORIES 



BUY DIRECTS. SAVE 





40 CHANNEL 
CONVERTER 
$38 Regular £69 

Advanced Solid State design and ciruitry 
allows you to receive mid S sjper 
band channels. Restores programmiitg 
(0 Video Recorders. 

36 CHANNEL 
T^ REMOTE CONTROL 
] CABLE CONVERTER 
$88.00 

DIAMOND D-56 WIRELESS 
THE ULTIMATE CABLE T.V. 
CONVERTER 

56 CHANNEL 
INFRARED 
REMOTE CONTROL 
S1 39.00 



Send SI for Complete Catalog 
VISA • MASTERCARD • COD 



DIRECT \flDEO SALES 

P,0. BOX 1329 
JEFFERSONVILLE, INDIANA 47130 

CALL 
1-812-282-4766 



CIRCLE 4 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




I ADVANCE ELECTRONICS IS PROUD TO 
m INTRODUCE THE A. W. SPERRY 
INSTRUMENTS LINE OF TEST EQUIPMENT. 




15 MHz DUAL TRACE PORTABLE 
W/INTERNAL BATTERY PAK 




20 MHz DUAL TRACE W/BUILT-IN 
COMPONENT CHECKER 



CALL FOR 

OUR 

SPECIAL 

INTRODUCTORY 

PRICES 



MODEL 

3^^'^ THE SMALL PORTABLE 

FEATURES WITH BIG FEATURES 

• AC/DC powered • 2inV/Vertical sensitivity • TV 
(Video) sync filter • ZVn" internal graticule, high 
brightness CRT • X-Y display mode • Add/Sub 
mode with ch.2 invert • Automatic and triggered 
time base • Trace rotation adjustable from front 
panel • Internal rechargeable pak included • 
Lightweight 12.1 lbs with battery • Small size 
(4.4" X 8.8" X 11.7") 

SPECIFICATIONS 

Vertical System CH. A and CH. B- Deflection Factor, 2mv/div - 
1 0v/div, 1 2 steps • Frequency Response, DC-15MHz{-3dB)» 
Rlsetime, 24 ns • Maximum Input Voltage, 300 V (DC + AC 
peak) 'Input Impedance, IMfi ±5%, 20pF ±3pF« Display 
Modes, CH-A. CH-B, DUAL, ADD, CHOP • Internal Horizontal 
System (Sweep Operation) • Deflection Factor, 0,5/u5'div. - 
O.Bs/div (-5%), 19 steps • Magnlticatron, 5x all ranges • Trigger 
System - Sources, INT, CH-A, CH-B, EXT • Modes, AUTO, 
NORMAL • Sensitivity, INT: 1 Div or more, EXT: IV p-p • Cou- 
pling, DC, TV SYNC. 




MODEL 
620C 



FEATURES 

• Component checker for locating defective 
components in or out of de-energized circuits. • 
6" high brightness, internal graticule CRT • TV 
(Video) sync filter • Z axis (intensity modulation) 

• High sensitivity X-Y mode • Front panel trace 
rotator • Low power consumption • 3PCB modu- 
lar construction • Comes with 2 year warranty 

SPECIFICATIONS 

VferWca; System CH. A and CH. B- Deflection Factor, 5mV/div- 
20v/div, (±3%) 12 steps • Frequency Response, DO-20MHz 
(-3dB) • Risetime, 17ns or less • Maximum input Voltage, 300 
V {DC + AC peak) • Input Impedance, iMn ± 5%, 20pF ±3pF • 
Invert, CH-B only • Operating Modes, CH.-A, CH.-B, DUAL, 
ADD, X - Y • Internal Horizontal System (Sweep Operation)- 
Tlme Base, 0.2/iS/div-0.5s/div (±3%) 20 steps • Magnification, 
5x • Trigger System - Sources, INT, CH-B LINE, EXT • Modes, 
Norm, Auto • Coupling, AC, HF rej, TV • Slope -i- or - • 
Sensitivity, INT: 1 div or tetter, EXT: IV p-p or better. 



A.W. SPERRY INSTRUMENTS INC. 

FEATURES A FULL 2 YEAR PARTS AND LABOR WARRANTY ON OSCILLOSCOPES. 




AWS DIGITAL MULTIMETERS 

Models EZ-6100, 6110, 6200 & 6220 

• Autoranging on volts and ohms 

• Self-contained 10 Amp AC/DC ranges (EZ-6110 
& 6220) 

• Low power ohm ranges — applied voltage « 0.3V. 

• Continuity buzzer (EZ6100 & 6110), 5 settings 

• Range hold (EZ6100 & 6110) 

• Large ZV2 digit LCD display 

• 300 hours continuous operation 

FIVE-YEAR WARRANTY 



MM 



puEEHOTUHE THE TEST EQUIPMENT SPECIALISTS 

800.223-0A7A 



26 WEST 46th STREET, NEW YORK, N.Y, 10036 • 212-730-7030 



ADVANCE^^^J 
ELECmONJC^^^-' 



Put Professional Knowledge and a 

COLLEGE DEGREE 

in your Electronics Career through 

HOME 
STUDY -^ 




Earn Your 

DEGREB 

No commuting to class. Study at your 
own pace, while continuing your present 
job. Learn from easy-to-understand les- 
sons, with help from your home-study 
instructors whenever you need it. 

In the Grantham electronics program, 
you first earn your A.S.E.T. degree, and 
(hen your B.S.E.T. These degrees areac- 
credited by the Accrediting Commission 
of the National Home Study Council. 

Our free bulletin gives full details of 
the home-study program, the degrees 
awarded, and the requirements for each 
degree. Write for Bulletin R-SA, 

Grantham College of Engineering 

2500 So. LaCienega Blvd. 

Los Angeles, California 90034 

CIRCLE 98 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



YOUR EXCITING 
NEW HOBBY! 

SI Enjoy fantastic savings by assem- 
bling your own organ or piano. 

lit It's easy. !No technical 
knowledge required. 

B» Just follow our clear, 
pictured instructions, 

*i Choose from many models 
from portables to consoles. 

fw Ask about our interest-free 
installment plan. 

ORGAN & PIANO KITS 

f-'jr Ffet InfomwCfln Pa<;kM40 

^, Call Toll Tirt 

r^' \ 800 233 3965 

jn«fi**T.^*^ •'^^I'l PA 7 I J 2qq 4327 



g 
z 
o 

DC 

h- 

o 

UJ 
_l 
m 

Q 

Q 

< 



WERSI Depi M40 PO Box 5318 
Lancaster PA 17601 

D Free Inio, Pack: H Organ □ Piano 
D Catalog & Demo Record ipicosr S6. 

Name 

Address 

Ciiy 

Phone I |_ 



_ State. 



.Zip. 



Rep inquiries inuited 



TALKING ALARM CLOCK 



continued from page 60 



The second way of feeding data to the 
VSP is through its microprocessor in- 
terface. The interface consists of a 
bidirectional data bus with some control 
lines. In addition to being used to carry 
speech data, that bus is also used to send 
commands to the VSP, Those commands 
control all the VSP functions. 

During speech generation, the micro- 
processor first detemiines which words to 
speak. If the speech data for a particular 
word is in the dedicated speech- memory 
ROM, the microprocessor sends a com- 
mand to the VSP to address that word, 
and then sends another to start speaking 
the word. The entire data fetching and 
speech-generation process is handled 
automatically by the VSP. The micropro- 
cessor simply commands the VSP to 
select a certain word and commands it to 
start speaking, if the speech data is not in 
the speech ROM. but in the PROM, then 
the microprocessor sends a command to 
the VSP instructing it to start accepting 
speech data via the microprocessor in- 
terface. The microprocessor then sends 
the coded speech-data to the VSP, and the 
VSP speaks the word. As the VSP gener- 
ates speech, the microprocessor con- 
stantly reads its status to determine when 
it has finished a word. It then commands 
the speech processor to speak another 
one. thus producing phrases made up of 
several words. 

When we continue next time, we'll de- 
scribe the clock hardware as well as the 
software that is needed to drive it. And of 
course well cover completely construc- 
tion, checkout, and use. R-E 



Many Happy 
Returns ^ 



m 



.stockXyo^ 
in^nerica. 



The mrorlil of 

electronics 

gee-mfizardry 




-YOURS FREE. 

32-pages ot test instruments — from tfie 
latest digital multimeters to the famous 
EICO scopes. Security systems. Auto- 
motive and hobbyist products. Kits and 
assembled. EICO quality. EICO value. 
For FREE catalog, check reader service 
card or send 50<! for first class mail. 



£lCO^ 



v_ 



10S New South Road 
Hicksville, N,Y. 11B01 



CIRCLE 50 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



€:^t;^ae Socket 
* §2-^^ Sample Pak 




you can now receive nine phosptxsr bronze IC 
sockets absolutely FREE It is our way of intro- 
ducing you to the quality parts we offer. 

Sample Pak ^ ^*- s-e470i3-i4 (i4 pin) 

, 7 ", 3 ea. SS47013-16 (16 pin) 

includes: 3 ea. S-247!M040 (40 pin) 



D YES, please send me a FREE 
SOCKET SAMPLE PAK, plus 
your brochure on additional 
products available. 

Please include i1.M tQ tKIp cover postage and tiandliris. 

Name . 



Address. 

City 



State 




14803 N.E. 40th Dept. RE023 
Redmond, WA 96052 



106 CIRCLE 95 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



CIRCLE 97 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



This publication 
is available 
in microform. 



mmiTi n^tibH it«t*atiiiHiii 




University Microfilms 
International 



Please send additional information 

for^ 

Mame 



Institution . 

Street . 

City 



Stale. 



.Zip_ 



300 North Zeeb Road 30-32 Mortimer Street 

Dept.RR. Dept. P.R. 

Ann Arbor. Mi. 48106 London WIN 7RA 

USA England 



Be an FCC 
LICENSED 

ELECTRONIC TECHNICIAN! 



^*t:^y 



It cam III hntrtfin Sparc nine. 



^^^r£i? 



No cosily School. No i^ortimuiLiip to i;lsss. The Original 
Vtonie-SiLidi touric [ha.E preparer you for the FCC Radio- 
itlcphdric litcn<iec\ann in your spare liine] Pawing thccitam ii 
your "ticker" to rhQusand'ii of c^cinnf opportunities in 
Communiualiunv Bfcatlfasnng. Mobile r^o-way syssenn. 
Microwave siaiions. Radar in^ialt;!iions. Acrovpactand more 

NO NEED TO QUIT YOUR JOB OR GO TO SCHOOL 
You learn hov, lo pavs ihe FCC License ti(ani at home ai your 
own pace with thu easy -to^ understand, proven course. Wiihin 
a few shoft weeks you eoutd be on your way lo bein^ one of 
the highest paid v^orkervin the elect ronit^ Held- ItHihat eajvyl 
U.S. Kederat law requirc^ you to have an FCC License if you 
want to operate and maEOiain virtuatfy any communk'otuj'ns 
SiViitfm — you don't need a College degree to qualify, but you 
DO need an FCC Licenve, With ihis Home-Study course, 
youMI be readj [o pass ihe FCCGovcmtncnl liicensingcxatr in 
a remarkably short time. Send for KRtiE faccv now. No 
obhgaiion- No lalcsmcn will lsIL MAIL COUPON TODAYl 

r corfimfliiD MiowJcfiofis' " "I 

I FCC LICENSE TRAINING, Dept. E ■ 

■ P.O.Boi!2223,SanFrancisco,CA94126 I 

I Rsjsh I'Kr.F liii;!^ uri tuiw I csin pfeparc ft>r rny FCC ' 

I I k'cnsc lat home in rtiy ^parc lime. I 

' MAME - { 

j ADDRESS \ 



.„STATE_ 



CIRCLE 96 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 





There Ls a road. 



Many cancer patients 
fipfit Iransportnlinn lo 
and trom irealmenls. 
Thai s why the 
American Cancer 
Society has formed 
groups of volunteers 
across iln' Uniletl 
Slates who give a 
\, few htjin.sof Iheir 
-^ lime each month lo 
y I drive Itiern. The 
_\ rtyad lo recoveiy 
[71 can be a long and 
difficult one, bulit 
k . can KjtMhai much 
- -\ i-asit^r when there 
■"■ art- (nend.s who can 

ihalp aloni^jthe \vay 





Model 8022B 
3-1/2 Digit 
"Trouble- 
shooter" DMM 

• 0.25% accuracy 

• 6 functions 

• 24 ranges 

• Diode test 

Overload protected, 
comes complete with 
test leads, battery and »4mm 

2-year warranty. $ 1 44 

DC Voltage: 200m V-2-20-200-1 000 V. AC Voft- 
agc : 200mV-2-20-20O-750V. DCI^C Current: 
2-20-20O-2000mA. Resistance: 20O-2k-20k- 
200k-2l^-20l^n. Send check or charge 
MasterCard, Visa, or American Express, 
To order: call 1 -800-22 5-5370 
Contact East, 7 Cypress Drive 
Burlington, Massachusetts 01S03 

CIRCLE 13 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



TIMEX/SINCIAIR COMPUTER USERS 
We Have The Books You Need 




D JtHT OF PROG RAM MINIS THE IK ZXBL 

How to use Ihe (eatufes of Ihe ZXSI m prajrams 
that tit into the IK machine 9€pp S5.75 pt^stpald. 

C ART OF PROGRAMMING THE 1BK ZXB1. 

How to use your 16K BAM pacit and ZX pnntei to 
the U 144 pp S6.9S poslpgid. 

a ART OF PROGRAMMING THE ZX SPECTRUM. 
Everylhing yoi; need to know To put Itie ZX 
Spectium to work lor you 144 w- H poitpaid. 

ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY TODAY, INC. 

p 0, eox as 

MASSAPEQUA PARK. NY 11762 

Name; . 

Add ress ■, 

Clly 



[^ Number of hooks order 



State', 
ordered 



^ip:. 



HOBBY MICROWAVE ANTENNAS 
"COMPLETE SYSTEMS" 




ONLY iitSU 



OUR 
LOW PROFILE 



A e (ta,n 

TUMER 



TUNER 



ti COAl 3 CmX TUIltB W SIJTtM -WIT FOB S.T.I" 
WE REPAIR ALL MICROWAVE Sir.M 



OORD'FBEE 

UP TO 1 MILE RANGE 

-PACEB- 

MULTIPLEX 

S»T,50 

TRUE TOUCH TOME 



DEALER PROGRAMS AVAILABLE 




& 



COMPLETE SOMAW PflQDLIN 

SATELLITE SYSTEM 33250.CM 



^^^■1 14$£4 CAUDEN AVE SAJN JOSE. GA S&1E4 ^^^R 

CIRCLE 29 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



> 

CD 
CO 
CO 



107 



This space contributed as a public service. 



Electronics Paperback Books 

Quality Paperbacks at Affordable Prices 

BUY 12 PAY FOR ^0— TAKE 2 FREE! 




Z 30 SOLDERLESS 
BREADBOARD PRO- 
JECTS eooK-1. 

SS.TS. Wh«fiBv«r pOHl^ 



bulidtr can cofngWv 
eheia ercuiti. 

- HOW TO GET 
YOUR EtECTRONIC 
PROJECTS WORK- 
ING. $5.00. H«I[)S you 
iFQu^lQihoa^ ana rspiur 
F-onW'bun prO|*Cti cd 

~ MINt'HATRIX 
BOARD PP^JECTS. 
$5,00. A mnBEy tA pro- 
[K'A 1M*1 can an E» 
tiUllE upon a mifti.ffli,1rli 
boird 1Ka1 has 1C} strips 
and It 24 no!« long 



" MOOERN OP-AMP 
PflO^ECTS, S5.U. 

Wk!« fan9« OP spMLH' 
i2kE op-amp circuits m- 
cludrfifl lo-nOfM. 10- 
drtUnnn, iAta-ht inpul 

Z MULTKaRCUrT 

BOAHD PflOJECTS, 
S5.00. 2i lairly simp^fl 
flrojflctj tiTii can til be 
buill an a singlo 
prinlM-CircuH tKM^O AH 
are sovarna by a 9V 

Z 1C PROJECTS 
FOR BEOIHNERS. 
SS.OO. LnexpeiraFVfl o^pi- 
ipl vus urvur IC t VC 
i^sK] Id dBSWTiEite [hi& 
seteaion of circuits in- 
lOAdsd ror iha £«•' 



- ART OF PFtO- 
GRAMHING THE IflK 
ZW.«.!S.Tflp«in 

CivM lull GcrMn. scroll- 
ffig. PEEK £ POKE, 
Blus uivai workin^i 
prcigrams 

Z THE 6909 CONk 
PANIOH. $5.00. Wnl- 
»n lor trw Average 
as&emdly languiage 
CKogrammef.A ChBcui- 
snn ar 6SQ9 laalurca L 
rfl1"ef«rte* *orK tof Die 



PRACTICAL COM- 

PLrren EX- 
PEHIHEHTS- S4.50, 
Fi 's .T DackgroUv'xJ to 
rTKfC'Pi5cesJ&' &>■ CCin. 
slrucnng [ypical compu- 
Ler circitils usmj <3is- 
cr«l0 k>gic cOmponenEs 



^ ARTOFPRO- 
GRAUHIHGTHElK 
ZXB1 . SE,O0. How 10 

uss CtiB fsat>iirs5 a\ l!w 
2X61 in progf juns tnji 
JiT 1h« 1 K rnacrMTH anfl 
ve slill lun E9 u$e. 

~ INTflODUCTJON 
TO BASrC PRO- 
GRAMMING TECK- 
NiOUES. S500. eased 

on uulhiDr's Dwn expen- 
enco in lejifjiang 6aSiC 
arid fw-ping abhors ;a 
loam 10 pfogram 

~ A UICRaPROCE& 
SOfI PRIMEH. S4.50. 
PamlB&s apparoacn la 

compuHsi '«* the be- 
ginTiffr. Sljep-l!:iy-5!Bp 
eiplflfis cCHT.puEer 00^ 



FIRST BOOK OF 
HI'Fl SPeAKER EN- 
CLOSURES. S4.M. 

~ SQitD STATE 

HOVEI-TY cjRCurrs, 

2e TESTED TfWK' 
SISTOR PROJECTS. 

SOLIO-STATE 
SHORTWAVE HE- 
CELVERS FOR BE- 
GINNERS- M.50. 

SO PROJECTS US- 
ING 1CCA 3130. 
S4 50 

50 CMOS EC PRO- 
JECTS. U.SQ. 

HOW TO 9UIL0 
ADVANCED SHORT- 
WAVE RECEIVERS. 

ss.oo. 

Z BEGINNERS 
GUIDE TO SUIUDING 
ELECT710NIC PRO- 
JECTS. %5M. 

ESSENTIAL 
THEORY FOR THE 
ELECTftOHCCS HOB- 
BYIST.SE.OO. 

FIRST flOOK OF 
TRANSISTOR EQUIV- 
ALENTS, t: sua- 

STITUTES. S3.T5. 

r PRACTICAL COM- 
PUTER EX- 
PERIMENTS. S4.5d. 



. ENOINEEflSA 
MACHINISTS flEFEH- 
ENCE TABLES. S3.». 

SECOND BOOK 
OF TRANSISTOR 
EOUIVALENTS fi 
SUBSTTTUTES- W-SO- 

- 53 PROJECTS US- 
ING »C 741. S4 JO. 

~ BEGINNERS 
GUIDE TO 
1^ PROCESSORS & 
COMPUTING- S4.sa. 

~ VHOS PROJECTS. 
SSuOO. 

~ HOW TO USE OP- 
AMPS. S5.7S. 



~ Ca PROJECTS, 
S5O0L 

Z HOW TO GET 
VOUR ELECTRONIC 
PROJECTS WORK- 
ING, SS.OO. 

- MULTl-CIRCUnr 
BOARD PROJECTS. 

SS.OO. 

~ ELECTRONICS 
SJUPLIFIED CRYSTAL 
SET CONSTRUCTION. 
$4.50. 

~ ELECTRONIC 
HOUSEHOLD PRO- 
JECTS. Sfl.SO- 




■ POWER SUPPLY 
PROJECTS. S4.$C]. 

Contain} designs and 
consl'ucton del a 1 13 for 
alFnost any poi**r sup- 
ply tt]t ejcDflnmanlBr is 
hluly to navel 

Z flEMOTE CON- 
TROL PROJECTS. 

SS.OO. Raflio-eoficfoi 

inira^red, vibibla ligFil. & 
ullrasanip systems are 
all AcioMd. aidng wiin 
machodi oF applyinfl 
tiiem 

~ ELECTRONIC 
TEST EQUIPMENT 
CONSTRUCTION. 

S4^ ConH-TAfiiDn Off- 
lai's Qf a vKiB ra^^gf or 
last equipment itw *«■ 
pannwnMr can txjilid 4L 
tKinM 



~ ELECTRONIC 
PROJECTS USING 
SOLAR CELLS. SS.OO. 

Stmple circuity 1tu1 
have rurrwous ao- 
qJcaliDTVi aroimd i\vt 
lumt 

Z ELECTRONIC TIM- 
ER PROJECTS. $5.00. 

Timing circuits fef 
i\irnif[ uny ippljcatiOi^ 
Iha aXpanmanter migPd 
nefid. A mosr valuable 
nriarencB 



Z COUNTER DRIVER 
«r NUHERICAL- 
DJSPLAY PROJECTS. 
S4.50. F9Ki;;l09, atf 

Li-sing van&ij cypoj ^r 
nufiun^'OiSptay da- 




~ PRACTICAL ELEC- 
TRONICS CALCUl-A- 
nONS AND FORMU- 
LAE. ST.SOl a tWJjc 
rer^rancg wbtk ttui 
tindges IMe ga^i pe- 
Meen comfjiicaiBO 
IhJviipdI Ihecry A cu\ 



- HOW TO MAKE 

WALKIE TALKIES. 
SS.OO. De&c:^$s equiQ- 
menc lor Ifr^'P^rtr 
harK3t>Bld oparAlKHi 
il^iu^eseri must 
reuirq For 1h» CMi- 
catedq 



~ INTERNATIONAL 
DIODE EQUIVALENTS 

GUIDE- SS.7S,Hfrtw 
>0u hnd >uD£Ci[uWt lor 
3ie many dittarenl 
?yp« cd SKMkxindudot 
opdfla in uaa bday. 

~ INTERNATIONAL 
TRANSSTOR EOUtV^ 
ALENTS GUIDE. 

V^. Products of 
ffwre (Han. itio man" 
ulacUKflra ■re' listed & 
cron-tflrflrencod *iin 
polsibJe TflplacsriHTitx. 



Z ELECTROMC 
CALCULATOR US- 
ERS HANDBOOK. 
SSrSSr Preier*lJ (omiu- 
lae daU. maihods OT 
caicuiabcn. conversion 
Facms a mOf« irom [lu 
viBW □( thfl ciilcutxlpr 



Z LINEAR tC EQUIV- 

AUEJ^TS AND PIN 
CONNECTIONS. Se.25, 

Shorn aquivalanis & pui 
connjtrctior^s oi a popu'tr 
user-onanled ae^cluy^ OF 
tineor ICf 



r ELECTRONIC 
SYNTHESIZER PRO- 
JECTS. (4.50. 

~ 50 ciRcurrs us- 
ing GERMANIUM. 

SILICON A ZENER DI- 
ODES. S3.7&. 

Z so PROJECTS US- 
WG RELAYS. SCR'S 
& TRIACS. SS.OO. 

Z H (FETl FSELD- 
EFFECT TRANSIS- 
TOa PROJECTS 

U.MI. 

Z 50 SIMPLE LED 

CIRCUITS. W.iS- 

3 SO CIRCUITS US- 
ING 7400 SERIES 
KTS. S4.50. 

Z 5° SIMPLE LED 
CIRCUITS BOOK S. 
£3.95. 

PROJECTS USJNO 
S55 JC'S. SS.0O. 

Z PROJECTS USING 
Lh»400 IC'S. S4.TS. 

~ RADIO CONTROL 
FOR BEGINNERS. 
£4.50, 

~ ELECTRONIC 

GAMES 54.5(3. 

SINOLE )C PRO- 
JECTS. S4,2S. 

Z RADIO CIRCUITS 

USING IC'S. S4.S0, 



Z ELECTRONIC 
PROJECTS FOR BE- 
GINNERS. $S,00. 

"■ ELECTRONIC 

MUSIC & CREATIVE 
TAPE RECORDING, 
SS.OO. 

Z ELECTRONIC 
SECURITY DEVICES 
S€,00. 

HOW TO 8UILD 
YOUR OWN SOUD- 
STATE OSCILLO- 
SCOPE. $5,00. 

" SECOND BOOK 
OF CMOS IC PRO- 
JECTS, S4,2S. 

7 PRACTICAL CON- 
STRUCTION OF PRE- 
AMPS, TONE CON- 
TROLS. FILTERS AND 
ATTENUATORS. 
S3.75, 

Z BEOlNKEnS 
GUIDE TO DIGFTAL 

TECHNIQUES, S3,75. 

~ ELECTRONIC 
HOUSEHOLD PRO- 
JECTS, $4,U. 

" ELECTRONIC 
MUSIC PROJECTS. 
U,50. 

POPULAR ELEC- 
TRONIC PROJECTS. 
S3.T5. 

' PROJECTS IN 
OPTO-ELECTRONICS. 

*s.oo. 




Z ANTENNA PRO- 
JECTS. ts.0a Cowrs 
p^aacal anlimnB d*- 
aiQiM irvQuSiftg flCtrwt, 
toop & larnle lypei that 
ATB BBsy £ inexp«n9«v9 
iP&Uild. 

~ RADIO STATIONS 
GUIDE. 54,75. Cbnv- 
p^aliertjtve lifting 0^ 
iranimi^D^i arourKt in« 
ivorid PresanEs tpct- 
bon. <reQu«ncy, c»w*f 

- LONGDISTANCE 
TV RECEPTK)K 

(TVDX) FOR THE EN. 
THUSIAST, S5.0D, 
Practical £ au- 
Ihcffllauve inirodu«Kin 
TO 'his unusual awvd 
ol ■cflcironrjci 



~ CB PROJECTS. 
Si.00, A number ol 
us«1ul and in^BnusUng 
owsgns Ipr <^ 
aCCvSSOriBS. Sp««Cfl 
prpcej.-so'. imerlorsncs 

rmef a moffl. 

^ CRYSTAL SET 
CONSTRUCTION, 

t4.S0- Pfldwd Full Pi 
c-^y to dupiicau □«' 
Signs For cfystBl riidc 
t*ct<vef3 

- ANIKTROOUD- 
T10N TO RADtO DX- 
ING. SS-M- Ltslen, tn 
your homa. lo DtPAd- 
casts pngmtUng 
|houS£nd» OF m4H 
away Tails tww ypu 
can do q. 




ELEMENTS OF ELECTRONICS SpKlat 

6-vPlum« aei 



- THE SIMPLE 
ELECTRONIC CIR- 
CUIT & COM- 
PONENTS- S5.75. All 

Ifio iLryJanienlal Iheory 
neecnc 10 «h to a lun 
undficitgndjngi ol Iha 
S^SW «ledroiK clrcuil 
ana i\% cOmpOnSnts 

Z ALTEPINATING 
CURRENT THEORY. 

45,75, AiwrnaSing cuf' 
rent Iheorv willMsut 
which there can t» no 
COmpraho-nEicn ol 
spwch, musK, rado, 
or Tttviban 



~ MECR0PR0CE5S- 

FHG SYSTEM t CIR- 
CUITS. S7,50. A Injiy 
campraharutva guid? 
ID ill pi Che elenriflfiis oF 
a mtCrtip^rocess.'ng 
3^»lem. 



Z SEMICONDUCTOR 
TECHNOLOGY. $575. 

Evarylhing ycu always 



Z COHMUHCATIONS. 

tT.W. Covers mow 
rp&dem corrmK^nicalKJO 
sys1«ns Lmw. rTKro- 
wAviQ'. Submarine, sat- 
bIIIIb, (digital multtplax, 
raiJei |<Hftgrac*»y. 

Z AUDIO. S9.O0. 

Cliap;Br after chapm 
imasUgpites avary im- 
pdifin up«ctci1 tudio 
Circuiliv. 

~ SPECIAL OFFER— 
Complvt* BBl ol all 
slK vplvtnee—i bar- 
'gaJn tliot aavBi you 
S6-Z5— SPECIAL 
PRICE S34.00 FOR 
THE COMPLETE SET, 



ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY TODAY INC. 

P.O. Box 83, Fi/lassapequa Park, NY 11762 



O 



Numtjer of books ordered | 

Total Price of Boote 

Sales Tan (NY State Residents) 

Shipping (75e 1st two books, 30e ea additional) . 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 



Mame_ 



Address. 



-Stale. 



Cily 

Prices good until April 30, 1983 



JL\?^ 



I 



108 



MARKET CENTER 



PLANS & KITS 



NEW combo plans for SWD and microwave conver- 
ter. Send S14.95 to ADVANCE CIRCUITS, 8310 
East Main. Box 201, Mesa, AZ 85207. 

COMPONENT TV receiver construction bool<tel 
S8.00. SASE for catalog. DRM PRODUCTS, Box 

327 Syracuse, NY 13215-0327. 

TIMER, thermoineter, other kits, TRS-80 soft- 
ware, everything guaranteed, "for catalog: DAC 
INDUSTRIES, 6005 Musket Road, Fort Washing- 
ton, PA 1 9034. 

PRINTED circuit boards. Quick prototypes, pro- 
duction, design, renew soider. send print or descrip- 
tion for quote to KIT CIRCUITS, Box 235, Clawson, 
MI4S017. 

DESCRAMBLERS for cable and UHF kits and built 
units. For information send S2.0Q. MEAN ELEC- 
TRONICS, P.O. Box 347, Boston, MA 02188. 617- 
337-7303. 

UHF parts kit, Zenith type S21 6, Also microwave 
antennas $112. MICROSCAN, 8400 Eastwood. 
Minneapolis. MM 55432. 

COMBINATION computer desk and software 
storage. Plans and material )ist S10.00. 
RADkI'S COMPUTER SUPPLY, 6242 Hwy 12. 
West Helena, MTSS&OI. 



J I one o CAPACITANCE METER .1pFto999KuF 
!"> O FREQUENCY COUNTER 35MHJ 
J "" O SQUARE WAVE GEN IHl to 99KH2- 
O OHMMETER - 3.5SMMi Xlal - Regulated PS- Five 
' Reddouts-Low cost TTL Circujis- Automaitc 
-Jdimal Plademont-Be AMAZED -Bultd It lor 
S60 or toss. I PurcliasB the plans, drilled P.O. 
board 4-3/4" by 6-3/4" and (loni panel decal 
tor 5?1 ,-9 BAGNALL ELECTRONICS, B.lui.d- 
179 May Slreel. Fsirlietd. Conn. 06430 •'"' 



WATER sensor kits, ideal for projects, lun, experi- 
ment. Free details: WATER SENSOR, Box 331, 
Portage, Ml 49081. 

PRINTED circuit boards from your sketch or dia- 
gram. Free information. BUDGET CIRCUFTS, 6201 

Htlston. Depl. E, Austin, TX 78745. 

CABLE TV converters and equipment. Plans and 
parts. Build or buy. For information send S2.00 C & 
D ELECTRONICS, P.O. Box 21 , Jenison, Ml 4942S. 

LIGHT display sequencer kits Send stamp for 
(Iyer. DESIGN SPECIALTY, P.O. Box 1995, Hunt- 
ington Beacfi, CA 92647. 

SUBSCRIPTION TV manual, covers both sine 
wave and gated sync system, only $12 95. Includes 
theory, circuits, waveforms, and trouble shooting 
hints, information S2.00, refundable. D&S ENTER- 
PRISES, Box 0929ZR. Cleveland, OH 44109. 



To run yourown classified ad, put one word on eacti of the lines below and send this form alon^ with your check 

for SI. 90 per word (minimum 15 words) to: 

Radio-Electronics, 200 Park Avenue South, N,Y., N,Y. 10003 

ORDER FORM 
PLEASE INDICATE in which category of classified advertising you wish your ad to 
appear. For special headings, there is a surcharge of $15.00. 
( ) Plans/Kits ( ) Business Opportunities ( ) For Sale 
( ) Education/Instruction ( ) Wanted ( ) Satellite Television 



( )- 



Special Category: S15.00 
PLEASE PRINT EACH WORD SEPARATELY, IN BLOCK LETTERS.) 



PROJECTION TV.. .Convert your TV to project 7 
foot picture. Results comparable 1o $2,500 pro- 
jector.. .Total cost less than S20. 00.. .Plans S lens 
S17.50... Illustrated information free.. .Credit card 
orders 24 tiours. (215) 736-3979 MACROCOMA- 
Gl, Wfashington Crossing, PA 1B977 

SAVE steps, money. Use your telephones as an 
intercom. Plans $5.00. dB ENTERPRISES, Box 
453R. Westwood, NJ 07675. 



REVERBERATION 

FOR ORGANS 



Solid state witri controls for rever- 
beration and room size. 
EVERY ORGAN SHOULD 

OWN ONE. StndforfrMflYiir- 

DEVTRONtX ORGANS, (NC. 

S101 WAREHOUSEVVAY 

SACRAItlENTO, CALIFQRMIA95826 Ctepl. B 



ELECTRONIC touch light conWDl pad five modes 
dim medium bright delay and off. Two kits available. 
Vifrite for free brochure. EXOTIC ELECTRONIC 
IDEAS, P.O. Box 446, Lake Bluff, IL 60044. 

KITS, plans, devices, miniature transmitters, tele- 
ptione circuits, electronic article surveillance, radio 
homing, motion detection, laser, radars. Giant cata- 
log S2.00. INFORMATION INTERNATIONAL, P.O. 
Box 5162 RE, Tampa. FL 33675. (813) 949-7504. 

VIDEO game cartridges are easy to duplicate. Aver- 
age cost per game 310,00. Complete, detailed 
plans S9.95. RANDOM ACCESS, Box 41770R, 
Ptioenix. AZ 85080. 



FREE KIT Catal og 



conlaini 
TEST & 
EXPERI- 
MENTER'S 

EQUIP. 



i^Ar^C SCIENTIFIC INSTHLIMENTS 
"^"^ BOX 144 VALLEY SPRINGS CA 9SZS2 



FUNCTJON GENERATOR KIT $59.95 

Phone 209-772-2076 

Write nr Phnne for FREE C.^TALOCi 



1t 



16 



21 



26 



31 



12 



17 



22 



27 



32 



10 



13 



14 



15 



18 



19 



20 



23 



24 



25 



28 



29 



30 



33 



34 



35 



PLEASE INCLUDE FOR OUR FILES YOUR PERMANENT ADDRESS AND PHONE NUMBER. 

CLASSIFIED COMMERCIAL RATE for firms or individuals offering comerciai products or services). 

SI. 90 per word prepaid (no cfiarge for zip code). ..MINIMUM 15 WORDS. 5% discount for 6 issues, 

10% for 12 issues within one year, if prepaid. 

NON-COMMERCtAL RATE (for individuals who want to buy or sell a personal Item) $1.25 per word 

prepaid. ..no minimum. 

ONLY FIRST WORD AND NAME set in bold caps. Additional boid face (not available as all caps) at 1 5c 

per word. All copy subject to publisher's approval. ADVERTISEMENTS USING P.O. BOX ADDRESS 

WILL NOT SE ACCEPTED UNTIL ADVERTISER SUPPLIES PUBLISHER WITH PERMANENT 

ADDRESS AND PHONE NUMBER. Copy to be in our hands on the 20th of thethird month preceding tlie 

date of the issue [i.e.. August issue closes May 201h). When normal closing date falls on Saturday, 

Sunday, or a holiday, issue closes on preceding working day. 



UHF wave converter — cheapest, most superior de- 
sign on market. Approximately $20 worth of readily 
available pads, your old B&W TV and a basic knowl- 
edge of electronics necessary. Plans $5.00 and a 
SASE. RAMP ELECTRONICS, 1500 Venera Ave., 
Suite 2-D. Coral Gables, FL 33146. 

SUBSCRIPTION TV sinewave type. PCB and plans 
SI S.50. RVB INDUSTRIES, Box 663, Skokie, IL 
60676. 

SINE wave decoder problems? fylanual includes 
trouble shooting, alignment, antenna hookup. Im- 
provements, theory $15.00. SIGNAL, Box 251 2-R, 
Culver City. CA 90230. 

TAILGATERS beware! Clever device ends this 
hassel. Quick, easy installation. Kit S4.95, two for 
S8.95. TAILGUARD, 8 Alpine Place, Franklin, IvIA 
02038. 

NEAT stuff! 40 page catalog of electronics kits parts 
and deals! Send 50 cents refundable first order. 
BEC, Box 401244R. Garland, TX 75040. 

ELECTRONIC debugging plans — kits— assembled 
units. Send S2.00— MOUNTAIN ELECTRONICS, 
Rt. 2 Box 30. Charlotte, TN 37036. 



COMPUTERS 



TI-99/4A owners. Send for free list of new and excit- 
ing software. DYNA. Box 1 24. Hicksville. NY 1 1801 . 

EXCHANGE vour Ti-99;4A cassette programs with 
others, wriie EXCHANGE, RE-1 , P.O Box 46. Ster- 
ling, VA 221 70. 

REEL TO REEL TAPES 

TRUCKLOAO sale Ampex high quality open reel 
lape, 1 800- or 2400-feet on 7- inch reels, used once. 
Cost of 40. $45.00. Casseftes available. VALTECH 
ELECTRONICS, Box 6-RE, Richboro, PA 18954. 



00 
CO 



109 



g 

z 
o 

& 

Hi 

_I 
m 

< 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

EARN money with your elecironics kiiowleflge. No 
Qimmicks. tree details: INNOVATIVE DESIGNS, 
Box 331 . Portage. Ml 49081 . 

PROJECTION TV... Make $SSs assembling pro- 
jectors... Easy. ..Results comparable to S2.500 pro- 
|ectors...Yojr total cost less Ihan S 17. 00... Plans, 
lens & dealers intormation SI 5. 50... Illustrated in- 
fcrmatior free... MACROCOM-GIX, Washington 
Crossing. PA 1 8977, Credit card orders 24 tiours. 
(215)736-2380 

WIND power an investment in the future. The right 
decision is essential. Inlormatior S2.0O WINDE- 
SIGN, Box 138, Boston, NY 14025, 

PORTABLE electronics construction projects 
"tjug detector," "pen transmitter," '"telephone 
scramblers," "telephone bugs" and automatic 
moniterlng equipment, many more, send S5. US 
to cover inlomalion package to HODGINS, RR#1 . 
Smiths Falls. Ontario, Canada K7A 5B8 



HIGHLY 
PROFITASLC 



ELECTRONIC 



ONE-MAN 
FACTORY 



Investment unnecessary, knowledge not re- 
quired, sales handled by professionals. Ideal 
home business Write today for facts' 

Postcard vwill do, Barta-RE-X, Box 248, 

Walnut Creek.CA 94597. 



UHF CONVERTERS 



UHF converters tor all major cities. Catalog S3.00, 
T.C.E.. Dept-RI, Box 343. Brooklyn. NY 11230. 



USA PAY-TV STATIONS 

PAY-TV stations. Complete and latest data on loca- 
tions, programming, equipment and more. Just 
S9,95. T.C.E., DEPT-R1 . Box 343, Brooklyn. NY 
11230. 



ElcGtronlos 



•IMIITMsnnTmt 




BUILD YOUR OWN ROBOT! 



Send today for your 52-page (8V2 >: 11") 
booklet containing complete reprints of 
all eleven articles in the Build Your Own 
Robot series by Jim Gupton. 

This all-inclusive reprint gives you all the 
data you need to build your own Robot. 

■ TELLS EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO 
KNOW to build the Unicorn-1 Robot with- 
out the need tor an engineering degree or 
special equipment. The robot is fully 
mobile with manipulator arms to grasp, lift 
and carry. 

■ MANIPULATOR ARMS and end-effec- 
tors (hands) are what enable the robot to 
perform useful tasks. Details of construc- 
tion techniques and considerations are 
fully explored. 



■ MOBILITY BASE is not a lunar space 
station. It is the drive system that permits 
the robot to move from here to there. Full 
construction details along with a discus- 
sion of power sources is included. 

■ THE BODY— FRAME AND ROTATION 
MECHANISM. This is the part that makes 
Unicorn-1 look like a robot. Wood and 
Formica are the materials for the body. 
Motors and gears are what make it func- 
tion. 

■ COMMUNICATIONS. How you can tell 
your robot what to do. Preprogramming 
techniques..., radio control....computer con- 
trol are all detailed. 

■ SENSORS. How to add sensors so your 
robot doesn't bump into things. 



iMlto EICBlrMlN 

Robot Reprints 
200 Park Ave. South 
New/ York, N.Y. 10003 



> print 



583 I 
I 



(Name) 



I want to order reprlnts@Sl2 00plusS1.00post- 

age and handling for U.S.. Canada and Mexico 

Add 99c sates tax for New York Slate residents onl^. [Street address) 
U.S. Funds only 

t want to order reprints @S12.00 plus S3 00 Air 

Postage and handling tor all otfier countri&s. 
U.S. Funds onl/ 



(City) 



(State) 



tap) 



Allow 6-8 wee^s far dsiivery 



We tfo not bill, check must be enclosed. 



SINCLAIR/TIMEX COMPUTERS 

YOUR Sinclair can drive a video monitor with our 
direct video kit, only $9.95. 12-incti B&W video 
monitor S98.45. RANDOM ACCESS, 6ox 41770R. 
Phoenix. AZ 85080. 



HOME ASSEMBLERS WANTED 

ELECTRONICS Irrrn is looking for assemblers in- 
terested in working at home. Send S3. 00 application 
lee: IROC, LJoppa Hill Road, liflanchester. NH 

03102. 



lisaa^ewFj 



REMO^ES-lfOCAL FROM MOST STEREO DiSCS 

Tht Tiiamp&Qn Vocal Eliminjtor cjn jctu;illy remuv^ mo« of 
vJftLjidif all Of d *QiQ vDcafist irom J 4iurn)ar(j \Xfito tKwa ifnd vet 
iMwe mMt cP t he bac kgio u nd muitir u i>ttnj died ' Kot an «juil i ler < Wt 
^tr the ohfl<w Write of call lo* « 2A pjgr 



Writ« to: LT Sound. □cpt,R, P.O. 9ak 338. Stone Mcunt^n, 



COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT 

VIDEOSCAN 1000 Slow Scan TV— hioh resolution 
(amateur, phone line, siirifeillance, teleconferenc- 
ing). Code-Star— Decode Morse. HTTY, ASCII. 
Large LED's or connect computer primer Morse-A- 
Keyer — CW keyboard. Tri-voltage power supply. 
Kits assembled Free brochures. MICROCRAFT 
CORPORATION, Box 513-HE, Thiensville, Wl 
53092. (414)241-8144. 



CABLE TV 



CHANNEL 3— 60db notch filter, 63.5 MHz. S32. 
CROSLEY, Depl 606, Box 810, Champlain, NY 
12919, 



CB RADIO 



GET more CB channels and range! Frequency 
expanders, boosters, speech processors, FM con- 
veners, PLL slider tricks, how-to tx)oks, plans, mod- 
ifications. Catalog S2.00. CB CITY, Box 31500 RE, 
Phoeniz, AZ 85046, 



CONVERTERS 



DELUXE sine wave UHF. parts SI 50. Digital phase 
inversion VHF UHF, parts S225. Both have sound 
out of TV like normal with only antenna connection 
to TV or VCR. Gated pulse wave UHF (speaker box 
type), parts S12S. Ail have true AGC, Quantity dis- 
counts Plans: Large SASE (54 cents postage), 
Free shipping'handiing. 1-312i'267-3455. LSR 
ENGINEERING, P.O. Box 6075, Chicago, IL 60680. 



PERSONAL ROBOTS 

ROBOT Shack — personal robot: Kits, parts, plans 

for (un and learning. Inexpensive, easy constnjc- 
tion. Basic plans S9.95, Advanced plans S19.95. 
Complete Droid— Bug kit S99,9S. Catalog 52.00. 
ROBOT SHACK, Dept 10, P.O. Box 582. El Toro. 
CA 92630, 




OW TO USE A COMPUTER 

Trsin H horns in spare time! No prftviaux 
experience needed! Now you can learn 
U all! Computer prog ram mhg,., 
computer appEications-. computer 
games,,. everything you ever wanted 
lo know about computer operation 5- 
U&e hundreds at programs already 
available or write your ownr.,budget- 
ing, real estate, bookkeeping, ex- 
penses, investments, interest, taxes, 
shopping lists, vacation planning^ad- 
dresses, phone number5r-,even for- 
eign languages and graphics. £k- 
peTts explain everything in easy-to- 
understand lar^guage with step-by- 
step diiections- Ttmex i::omputer In- 
cluded with your training-, plugs in- 
to any TV. Send for free facts! •m 



I less I COMPUTER TRAINlNa,Oept. Qm^ 

I KJJi(i^^^n.^^:»JScranton, Pennsylvania 1&515 ■ 
I Rush free facts how i can [earn computer applications, I 
I programming and operation at home in spare time. I 

j ttuni As* . I 

I AddrtK 



J CUt/Slilf/Zlp J 



110 



RELIABLE MICROWAVE TV ANTENNAS 
2.1 to 2.6 GHz 
Frequency Range 

34dti System Gain (IK Gceaier) 

Coraplele Syslem lpicTiiie4i 51 19 95 
Down Convener Probf Sfyte 

(AsxmbM t, Tested I S 49 95 
PDwer Supply It2V to tSV DC* I 

(AsseiUDieo « TesiHli S 39 95 



PETERSON 
ELECTRONICS 

4^ Auburn Blvd 
Sacrarremo CA95M1 

(91 6t 4B«-9071 

sPECii^i guitJiriTY ?mm 

Deilers Wanltd - COD'S 



I VURWAnRANTV 
PARTS e LABOR 



FOR SALE 



FM wireless transmitter: Transmits up to V< mile. 

(Approximately IVj" - 1" a V/') S30.00. Crystal 
controlled miniature transmitter S50.00. Telapnone 
transmitters (plans and schematics) $10.00. Send 
S3.00 (or our incredible cataiog. A.T.I. S., Box 405B, 
Dearborn. Mi 4B126. 

MICROWAVE antenna systems S 100.00, assem- 
bled and tested, postpaid. CODS. DECK ASSOCI- 
ATES, 4218 Ziegler, Dearborn. Ml 48125. 

USEE3 tubes at 'A price, checked, guaranteed. Send 
SASE list to BERNARD'S, Drawer B, Feiton, BE 
1 9943, 

PRINTED Circuit boards; quotes free, SASE to 
JAHMAAL ELECTRONIC SUPPORT, P.O. Box 
397. Troy, NY 12131. 

PROTECTED by official security service decals, 
self stick for business, home, or vehicle. Set of 

10 various sizes S5. Each additional set S4. MUL- 
LEN SECURITY, Depl-R, Box 1065, Fort Collins, 

CO 80522. 

PICTURE tube rebiilldlng equipment— we seii 
and buy new and used equipment. Free training, 
ATOLL TELEVISION, 6425 Irving Park, Chicago, IL 
60634. Phone 312-545-6667. 

POVERTY electronics— If you're on Mouser, Oigl- 
Key, etc. mailing list you also need our pricing. Send 
SASE to RR, Box 62, Edwards, IL 61528. 

OVER the air UHF converters, DLX sinewave. 
gated, addressable and coming soon very com- 
plicated audio FSK unit. Cable equipment, TV pre- 
amps, and many more. Catalog 52-00 refundabie. 
301-882-9362. SATELLITE ELECTRONICS, PO 
Box 9534, Baltimore, MD 21237. 

"ANTIQUE Radios; Restoration and Price Guide," 
Step-by-step guide to fixingold radios. 9Bpages, 53 
diagrams, 122 photos. $10.95 postpaid. SOUND 
BOX, Bo^f 313, Ettriok, Wl 54627, 

CABLE descramblers. Oak M35S sinewave 
$250.00 Jerrold gated-sync pushbutton S250.O0, 
Jerrold galed-sync digital IR remote S300.00. 
SPECTRUM TV SYSTEMS, 13108-233 S.E. Issa- 
quah, WA 9S027. 

LASERpowersupply12to28VDCinpiit2000VDC 

output 10 mA adjustable regulated 15KV trigger 
pulse SS9.95. TRI-TECH ENGINEERING, 711 S. 
Linden Ave, Bloomington, CA 92316. 

Newl Repair any TV., ..easy. Anyone can do it 
Write RESEARCH. Box 51 7C, Brea. CA 92621. 

SENCORE SGI 65 Stereo Analyzer. Mint condition 
with all accessories & manuals. $400 COD. M. 
McBURNEY, 7140 Marymount. Goleta, CA 93117 
(805) 963-0583 evenings. 

CABLE TV products; Wireless, corded & settop 
eonvertors. Send S3.00 for catalog. ADDITIONAL 
OUTLET CORP., 231 E. Commercial Blvd., Ft. 
Lauderdale, FL 33334. 



e£s: 




WRITE FOR 



McGEE'S 



SPEAfCER & ELECTRONICS CATALOG 
1001 BARGAINS IN SPEAKERS 

T*l.: 1 (S16) M2 SOTi 
mn MCGEE $I8EEI KANSAS CITY, MO. 64108 



SCANNER monitor accessories— kits and factory 
assembled. Free catalog. CAPRI ELECTRONICS, 
Route IR. Canon, GA 30520. 

CABLE TV SECRETS— the outlaw publication the 

cable companies tried to ban. HBO. Movie Channel. 
Showtime, descramblers, converters, etc. Suppli- 
ers list included. Send. S7.95 to CABLE FACTS, 
Box 711-R Pataskala, OH 43062. 

PCB 1 5 cents sq-in. Free drilling. Quantity discounL 
INTERNATIONAL ENTERPRISE, 6452 Hazel Cir- 
cle, Simi Valley, CA 93063, 



THE B£ST PIACE to MJY. SELL or 
JtMX NEW mi USED EQUIPMENT 

NUTS K VOLTS HAGAZINE 

Box.Mii-e ■ fxjkcmriK ca «i7i) 

(7H) tJJ.Tni 
Join Tlwvundt ot ktt4tn NKionwklc 

t^ftrf Momii 
OH 6 YiA* U.S, «J«CltWTK»0 
Sr.M - Iri aim • ilXU ■ In O i 
4tt tU.M 



mgam 




RESISTORS 'AW, ViW 5%C.F. 3 cents. 1 %M.F. 1 
ohm through 1 .1 meg. No minlmums. Volume dis- 
counts. Write JR INDUSTRIES, 5B34-B Swan- 
creek, Toledo, OH 4361 4. 

COLOR computer.ViC-20 programs hardware Rtty 
code EPROM Progammer RS-232. FRANK LY- 
MAN. Box 3091 , Nashua, NH 03061 

THE Intelligence Library, Restricted technical 
secrets — books on electronic surveillance, lock- 
picking, demolitions, investigation, etc. Free 
brochures: MENTOR, Dept, Z, 136-53 No. Blvd., 
Flushing. NY 11354. 

MICROWAVE antennas 2100-2600 MHz 
downconverter probe 18-inch parabolic dish 50-foot 
cable, power supply, 6 month warranty. MDS 
ASSOCIATES, 21 1 6-2nd Ave. North, Minneapolis, 
MN 55405. Just $109.95. 

COLOR computer ovuners— Free hardware and 
software catalogue, SPECTRUM PROJECTS, 93- 
15 86 Drive, Woodhaven, NY 11421 



Radio- 
Electronics 

SPECIAL REPRINT 

BUILD A BACKYARD SATELLfTE TV RECEIVER 



:....P.n."_^-r:^a?s.'o«'''^^^'- 






Don't miss out again! 



Send away today for your 36-page 
booklet coriEaining a complete reprint 
of all seven articles in the series on 
Oackyard Satellite TV Receivers by 
Robert B- Cooper Jr. 

This aN-inclusive report gives you all 
(he data you need to build your own 
Backyard SateHite TV Receiver, 

■ TELLS ALL ABOUT domestic satel^ 
lite communications, with tM details 
on how you can pull ttiose elusive TV 
signals from space, 

■ LEGAL REQUIREMENTS, techni- 
cal specifications, and how you^ the 



home constructorn can meet them. 
Find out what mechanical and eiec- 
trQmos skills you need, 

■ RECEIVER CHARACTERISTICS, 
technical details and specifications, 
along with examples of actual re- 
ceivers built at comparatively low 
cost. 

■ ANTENNA DESIGN,,/ and ex- 
actly how you can build a spherical 
antenna, while keeping total earth- 
station cost for the complete system 
under Srooo 

■ THE FRONT END is critical when 
you build your own system. We hetp 
you explore several different ap- 



proaches to making one that will 
work for you. 

■ RECEEVER-SYSTEM hardware, and 
how it goes together to bring you di- 
rect-from-satellite TV reception En 
your own home. 

To order your copy; 

Complete coupon and enclose it wiih 
your check or money order for S7-CC, 
plus SVQQ for postage and handling. 
We will shtp youi reprint Wjthin 6 
weeks of receipt of your ojder. All 
others add $400 (or postage. New 
York Stale residents must add 58c 
sales tax. 



Radta 

Eleetmies 



Satellite TV Raprinta 
45 East 1 7th Stroot 
New York. N.Y 10003 



I wan I reprints @ $7.00 fla£h, plus SI. Han- ^^^^ 

dting & Postage- 

I tiave flnclos«d £ 

add i&tes tax. 



. N.Y. State residents muflt 



> 

-< 

CO 

a 
u 

1t1 



FOR SALE 



UNUSUAL UHF subscription TV kits. Also micro- 
wave downconverters. Catalog 50 cenis. TROJAN, 
2920 Shelby. Indianapolis, IN 46203. 

MILITARY radios: R-174. tunes 1.5-18 MHz, AM- 
CW-SS8, amateur, shortwave frequencies: S47.S0 
mint. S27.50 good. Canadian Backpack Radio 
PRC-510. 38-54 MHz FM transceiver with headset, 
battery box, antenna: S34.50. 267.50 good. ARC- 
27 Aircraft Guard Receiver, 220-248 UHi AM. sin- 
gle channel: $12.50 mint. Schematics Instructions 
included. Add SS unit shipping. BAYTRONICS, De- 
pt. RE. Box 591 ■ Sandusky, OH 44870. 

SURVEILLANCE device schematics, books on 
electronic surveillance methods & equipment, 
locksmithing, covert technologies, etc. Catalog, 
SI .00. MENTOR, Oept. Z, 135-53 N. Blvd., Rush- 
ing. NY 11354. 

FAST dependable mall-order! Prime semicon- 
ductors, pans, supplies. Free 55 page catalog. 
THE PARTSTORE, Dept. 165. 999 44lh St.. Mar- 
ion. I A 52302. (319) 373-1803. 



Govt. SURPLUS 
ELECTRONIC 
EQUIPMENT 



New ITEMS. 



New BARGAINS! 



r o r r upon request. 

r n C C Send today for FREE copy of 
NEW CATALOG 83 • Address: Dept. RE 



FAIR RADIO SALES 

1016 E. EUREKA • Boi nOS ■ LIMA, OHIO • 4SB03 



EDUCATION & INSTRUCTION 

UNIVERSITY degrees by mail I Bachelors, Masters, 
Ph.D's-Free revealino details. flOUNSELtNG, 
Box 317-RE5, Tustin, CA 92680. 

EARN your university degree through evaluation 
assessmenu of existing education, experience, 
achievements. Call. (614) S63-1791, or write, 
ASSESSMENT, Box 13130 R. Columbus, OH 
43213. 

ELECTRONICS computer bool<s. International 
publishers. Lowest rates. Ask list. BUSINESS PRO- 
MOTION, Lajpat Rai Market. Delhi. India 



BOOKS 

NIKOLA Tesla's autobiography! Quality illus- 
trated paperback. Ill pages, S7.95. HART 
BROTHERS, Box 205K, Williston. VT 05495. 

************************* 

; QUALITY MICROWAVE TV SYSTEMS J 
************************ + 
♦ Complete Systems From ^69*= J 





* 1.9 to 2.5 




♦ 




t GHz 

^ Antennas 

% Galaxy 


feai^ 


If 




OOLO STAH j , 






* Electronics 






* 6007 N.Btst Ave. 


-- 


+ 

•4- 




* 6lendale, Az. 




♦ 




* 85301 


^1 


* 
♦ 




>^ (602) 247-1151 


SILVER BBITE 


* 
♦ 


Oi 


* COD'S 


ST* ft STAR 


* 


zr 


* Dealers Wanted 


•jl 


+ 


n 








STAR II 


3f 












r^ 


If 


VISA 




^^. 


* 


III 


4- 


^^^^HHI 




m* 


♦ 


_i 


^ 






Jf 


m 

6 

Q 


* 


^9 




4- 


< 




t*it**-ii 


•k***-t 


********** 


** 



JUALITY MICROWAVE TV SYSTEMS 



2.1 to 2.6 GHz Ant. 
34 db Gain or Greater 

" S!tS3& 
innrtiil BM Slyle 
las-omillltnifriil SINK 

"■"ft siiBi)iiHii?u'iD m\ J ?■!» 

1| S 9B5 

S l!!» 

- , I 

PtiiiiiDS-Tecn Electronics 

P.0.B0HM77Z 
J PDOemx. « 8S067 
7j (B02) ZB5-a235 



PUBtSBUBDR 



SATELLITE TELEVISION 

SATELLITE parabolic dish antenna manual, for- 
mulas, facts, S15. Write, J. FOX, 21617 Collier, 
Battle Creek, Ml 49017. 

SATELLITE TV — before you buy get this video cas- 
sette tape explaining operation setup and irouble- 
shooting. Save up to S500.00 on inslallatlon fees 
S49 . 95 V H S or Beta f ree system p rice 1 i St e nolosed . 
GATORVISION, Box 313, Hardin IL, 62047. 618- 
576-9229. 

SATELLITE antennas by Poiar-sperical, Build 1 0- 
foot wood under SI 60, metal S1 15, plans $40. PRO- 
TOTYPE ENGINEERS, Box 1812, Oeming. NM 
B8030. 

12 (ooL parabolic satellite antenna manual, only 
S24,9S, Up- convert your audio subcarriers to the 
FM-broadeast band, board and plans S4.95. Stereo 
matrix demod-decoder. partial kit S39.95 or board 
only SI 0,95. Tunable audio demod, partial kit 
SI 9.95 or board only S7.95. Send SI .00 (or more 
intormation, refundable with any order. loSA ELEC- 
TRONICS, Box 277T. South Milwaukee, Wl 531 72 



PAY TV/ AMATEUR TV 
RECEIVERS 



24 hour movies, specials, sports, etc. 

QUARANTEED FINEST models anywhere!! 

Writ* or Call for FREE BROCHUREI 

JARIK, 632 West Doran, Suite "F" 
Glendale, CA 91203, (213) 956-5839 



SATELLITE systems. Complete for 31,499. 100' 
LNAs S399, Free wholesale catalog, SIGNALS 
SATELLITE SYSTEMS, Box 8836, Detroit, Mi 
48224. 313-361-5146. 

HOW to build a satellite TV LNA or downconver- 
ter! Save hundreds! Free information! Send 
stamped envelope: XANDI, Box 25647. Dept, 21 J. 
Tempe, AZ 85282. 

7 toot parabolic antennas. S1 1 6,00, Send SI .00 for 
brochure. BOB'S ELECTRONIC SERVICE, 760S 
Deland. Fort Pierce, FL 33451 . 




MINI FM MIC 

ComiLKISJifr.orJy^'" r ^ 3.t- tonsmii 
to FM radw 8^108 MHi. EjicepEiorMJ au- 
aio quality. Tronsjiiils stzhle fignal up tt} 
yyi rt CompJeie kil irKi caso. baieery ^ 
inslnjctsorts. Only SI 5. 95. Aseemblad 
Sa)95. Atk) SI ,55 SiH ea. CA HES 
ADO TAX. Ssfid ?0c slamp for tfochure. 

s.E.co(p..soKii3a-nE 

Yaitu Unaa. CA. 3Wa 



INTERESTED in home satellite television? Don't 
buy anything until you've read Homesat Handbook 
& Buyers Guide. Our book tells everything about 
home satellite TV and may save you huridreds, 
even thousands of dollars in your selection and 
Inslallation of a system! SI 0.00: H & G HOMESAT 
SERVICES, Box 422. Seaford, N.Y. 11783. 

SATELLITEcables.connectors:TypeNUG-21D,'Ll 
S3.00 Elbow S4.95, UG-57B U %5.25, UG-29BU 
S3.90, F-59A 10,'2.15, RG-6U .12 cents ft, RG-59.'U 
copper 12 cents ft. RG-213U .36 cents ft., RG-214,' 
U SI .35 ft. Shipping: 10% $3 00 minimum. Free 
catalog. NEMAL ELECTRONICS, 132S NE 1 19 St., 
N. Miami, FL 33161. [305) 893-3924. 



SATELLITE TV WEEK 

The most ccwnptttff ^vrtkty listings. We cover more th^n 
Just SATCOM 5. Send $1 for uniplc topy. 

Satellite TV Week 

P.O. BOK S08, Fortuna. Cjilifornii 95540 
QUI tollfrae: (800) 358-5997. OiltfomU(707| 715-M76 




University Microfilms 
International 



Please send additional information 
lof - ^^ 

Name 



Institutton . 
Street 

Gty_ 



State. 



.Zip. 



300 ISorth Zeeb Road 30-32 Mortimer Street 

Depl.RR. Depl. RR. 

Ann Arbor. Mi. 48106 London WIN 7RA 

USA. England 



112 



BEGIN YOUR SPRING PROJECT AT THE SHACK 

Quality Parts! Huge Selection! No Minimum Order! 



New! 9-Position D-Sub 
Connectors 




Low 
As 



199 



The BEST for lessl Fit 
joystick ports of many 
video games and mi- 
cros. Perfect for mak- 
ing joystick extension 
cords or cfiassis 
mounting, 
ISi i-Conductor Plug. 

276-1 S37 1.99 

Si Socket for atuive. 

276-1538 2.49 

Lc] Hood. Fits both. 
276-1539 2.19 



Sale! EMI/RFI Filter 

Save «3<>7 




888 



Reg. 
11.95 



U.L./CSA Approved 
Protect Your 
Computer & Data 

Keeps power line 
transients out! Rated 
5Aat120VAC. 
273-100 . . Sale, 8.8B 



Low-Voltage Indicator 

359 




1CM7201. Triggers an LED 
(not incL) wfien voltage falls 
be[ow preset 2.9 V level. Easy 
way to add iow-battery warn- 
ing to power packs — ideal for 
nickel-cadmiumsl 
276-2333 3.59 



Com pressor/ Expander 
For Audio Use 



16-Pinl ' pa' 



699 



NE572. Dual-channat 
device can compress or ex- 
1 6-Pin 1 ' pand dynamic range, ideal for 

With Data stereo noise reduction systems. 6 to 
22VDC, single supply 276-1781 . . 6.99 

Single-Supply UART 

Full-Duplex Universal Transceiver 

;595 



m^^^^ 



«-Pln With J 
Spocs & Data , 



AV-3-1015. Accepts asynchronous serial bi- 
nary ctiaracters, converts to paraliel format. 

and vice versa. Multi-logic compatible in- 
puts. Fully buffered outputs. Low power. 
4.75-5.25VOC. 276-1794 5.9S 



Sound Switch Module 



Only 




-199 



Whistle Activated! 

• with User Notes 

• Up to 25 ft. Range 



Whistle once for on, 
again for off! Use it 
to control a relay, 
appliances, lights, 
TV sound, more. 6 
to 9VDC. 
277-1011 .... 1.99 



Tantalum Capacitors 



NEW! 



16 WVDC Minimum 

Premium capacitors for critical bypass, blocking, 
decoupling and filtering applications. Provide 
high capacity in a very small package. 



mf 


Cat. Ho. 


Eacft 


0.1 


272-1432 


.49 


0.47 


272-1433 


.49 


1.0 


272-1434 


.49 


2.2 


272-1435 


.59 


10.0 


272-1436 


,69 


22.0 


272-1437 


.79 



Stereo Y-Adapter 

L NEW! 199 



Adapts tVhJO phono 
plugs to Va" stereo 
mini jack. Color- 
coded. 
274-369 1.99 



DPDT Knife Switch 

yb 99' 



hrfi. 



Great for projects, an- 
tenna switching, 
model railroads and 
more. 0.5 A at 250VAC, 
Screw terminals, 
27S-1S37 age 



16K RAMs— 25% Off! 

a^StHi Reg. 3.95 

TWTTTn 295 

4116 Dynamic RAM. Under 450 ns 
access. Manufacturer's prime. 
Stock up now! 
276-2505 Sale, 2.95 



Mini SPST Switches 



fl 



249 



Pkg. of 5 



Normally open mo- 
mentary contact- 
Mount in '/»" hole. 
O.SAat 125VAC. 
27S-1S47 . .5/2.49 



Handy Digital 
Logic Probe 

Diagnose Any 
Digital Circuit 




LEDs indicate high, low, or 
pulsed (to 10 MHz) logic 
states. Minimum detectable 
pulse; 50 ns. Overload and 
polarity protected. 34" leads 
obtain power from circuit un- 
der test. 22-301 19.95 



Deluxe, 21-Range 
LCD Multimeter 

Time-saving 
audible conti- 
nuity and 
range-change 
indicator. tJ\ea- 
sures AC and 
DC voltage, 
AC and DC 
current, and 
resistance to 
20 megs. Tests 
forward con- 
duction of _ 
diodes and transistors. Over- 
load protected. Requires two 
"AA batteries. With spare fuse, 
test leads, instructions. 
22-191 79.95 




UHF Adapters and Connectors 





Fid, 


tm 


Adlpli 


To Fit 


Cit. Ng. 


Each 


A 
B 
C 


U6-255/U 
M-3M-T" 


Fsmale BWC 
S0-?39 


PL-259 
SO-239 

(2) PL-259 


278-120 
27B-121 
J7B-198 


2 99 
2.M 
2,59 


D 

E 
F 


PL-25B 
M-359 


SO-239 
PL-259 
Rtglil-Angle 


SO-239 
PL-259 


278-192 
278-1369 

27B-1 99 


189 
1.59 

2.09 



[siBiIlilerltss Push -On PL-259. For FIG5a'59 Z7B-19I) . .1.59 
El 1B94 FBmjlB BNC. Mounts in W hole 278-105 1.5S 

[3 UIi-8t Male BNC. SnUlerliss Far FiGSS 27B-1(13 2.29 

□1 UG-SB Mall BNC. Above, lor RG59fRGG2 279-194 .2.29 

d Inlins Femali BNC. For RG56 catile. 278-113 2.49 

[Kj Inline Female BNC. For RG59. RG62 cable 278-114 . . . 2.49 




Colored Mini Lamps 

Lonc^llfeln CQ'^ NEW I 

candescentB V*' IICVVi 
are great for 
model trains, 
panels, pro- 
jects, 60 mA, 

6V. 272-1098 3/69C 

12V. 272-1099 3/69« 



100 Disc Capacitors 



Builder's 
Bargain 



^ 



198 



Set 01 

too 



Includes NPOs. 
N-750S, Mylar and 
ceramics from 2 pF 
to 0.1 pF, WVDC up to 
1 kV 
272-801 ...Set, 1.98 



Mike Element 



^ 



-|19 



for Projects, 
Heplacement 



PC Board-Mount Electret. Omni- 
directional. 2-10VDC, 1 mA max, 20 
Hz to 1 5 kHz ± 4 dB, 270-090 ..1,19 



33% 
Off! 



Resistor Sale! 



Reg. 
2.99 



199 



Set of 
100 



s^ 



V*- Watt. 5% Toler- 
ance. 13 of the 
most popular val- 
ues. 271-308. 
Sale, Set^1.99 



Radio /haek 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION • OVER 8500 LOCATIONS WORLDWIDE 

Retail prices may vary at Individual stores antj dealers 



CIRCLE 86 ON FFtEE INFORMATION CARD 



> 



113 



o 



o 

< 

114 



WE HAVE QUALITY PARTS. DISCOUNT PRICES AND F^^ST SHIPPING! 



TRANSFORMERS 

120 ran 
primMrimt 

S.K VOLTS t1 750 MA tS.OO 

« VOLTS « ISO MA t1.25 

1S.iV. 113 AMPS M.M 

11 V al (SO MA M.SO 

H VOLTS Jtl AMP H^ 

ta V.C.T. al 2 AMP M.SO 

M VOLTS II isa MA i:.so 

2i VCTll 1 AMP S4.St> 

41 V.C.T. It t.l AMP »4.50 



DC WALL 
TRANSFORMER 




ALL ARE 11S VAC 
PtUOIK 



« VDC at TO MA tlSt 

« VDC at 100 UA $1.00 

* VDC It 21S MA iiM 

1B.5 VAC at 10 VA %iM 

17 VAC •! SOO MA tiJH) 

12 voc 11 SO MA asn 



VAR ACTOR 
DIODE 

MV22(I5 3 FOR t1.0« 

16 PF 100 FOB S3DO0 

BB-103 3(orS1,0«- 

33 PF lOCFOBSaOOO 



DIODES 

BRIDGE 

1 1/3 AMP 100 P.I.V. 
T0.5 CASE fl^^ 

3/S'^ DIA. 
3/ir HISM 2 ror $1.2$ 

S AMP 2M P.I.V, 

S/S" SQUARE 
$1.00 EACH 

to AMP aM P.I.V. 
5/9"SOUAFlE 



.25 AMP BRIDGE 

RECTIFIERS 

1 1/B-SOUAFIE 
IS AMP 200 P.I.V. 



T.V. GAME 
SWITCH 



RCA PLUG or 

300 OKM IN 



30t)orimi 
OUT 




LIGHTS 

GRAIN OF WHEAT 
T1 SIZE 



$2.00 EACH 



25 AMP too P.I.V. 



RECTIFIER 

1 AMP so VOLTS IS lor tl.DO 
1 AMP 2Q0 VOLT$ 10 lof $t.00 
1 AMP 900 VOLTS S Icr $1.00 
i'fi AMP 1000 VOLTS A lor $1.00 



CRYSTALS 

CASE STYLE HC33/U 



COLORSURST 
I tS.SOEACH St.WJEACM 



P 



2 CHANNEL LIGHT ORGAN 



EASILT HOOKS INTO STEHEO SPEAKERS 
ANP ALLOWS 110 VAC LIGHTS TO DANCE 
WITH MUSIC. TWO SEPARATE 1 10 VAC 
OUTPUTSFOHHIGHANDLOWFREQUENCV 
AUDIO SIGNALS. USE TWO OFIGANS FOP 
STEREO . . , 

$«.S(I PER UNIT 

COLORLIGHTSTniNO AVAILABLE $1 »T5 EA 




S.C.R. 

0.8 AMPS 30 VOLTS 

5 lor $1.00 
4 AMPS 200 VOLTS 

S5C EACH 

i AMPS 5i» VOLTS 
SSC EACH 



TRIAC 

6 AMPS 400 VOLTS 
75t EACH 



TRANSISTORS 



2h70fl 

2NZ222A 

PM2222 

2N2904 

2N200S 

2N2S0T 

MJ3030 

2N305S 

2N3SS5 

2H3904 

:N390S 

2N4401 

JNMW 

2N4$S< 

D43CI1 

D4tC2 

TIP 31 

TIPSJ 

TIP 121 

TIP 120 



S IcrSI.OO 
a laf $1.00 
a Isr (1.00 
4 lor $1.DD 
4 loi $1.00 

4 tsi tl.M 

I2.S0 
$1.00 
$1.00 

5 \w $1.00 
S \ar $1.00 
$ lor $1 .00 
5 Tor $1.00 

(1.S0 
2 for $1.00 
.TS 
.7S 
.7$ 
.7S 
.TS 



MICROWAVE 
TRANSISTOR 

MRF 901 B EDUCED TO 
N.PN SILICON $2.00 EACH 



12S" DIA fS.ISmmJ 

Hat VOLTS 3 iar $1.D0 
Rated, SSme tffi 5 VOLTS 

« Id 12 VOLTS 3 lor $1.00 
RatatI 55ma ^ e VOLTS 

12 10 24 VOLTE 3 Tof $1,00 
Raled 45mn @> 14 VOLTS 



12 VOLT A.C. POWER UNIT 




THIS UNIT CONSISTS OFA12VOLT2 AMP 
TRANSFORMEH. 1 AMP CIRCUIT BREAKER. 
4 PHONG CINCH JONES SOCKET AND A 3 
WIRE A C CORD ALL MOUNTED IN AN 
ATTRACTIVE tv i S» ■ « 3" CHASSIS BOX 
GOOD FOR PARTS OR A NICE START FOR 
DC POWER SUPPLY „ 5, pg^ ^j|,|,f 



T1 SIZE '^^^5^ 
WITH WIRE LEADS 

3 10 « VOLTS 3 lor $1,00 
Ftatad astna @ 5 VOLTS 

I to 12 VOLTS 3 (or $1.00 

Rated. SSina @ s VOLTS 

12 to 7* VOLTS 2 (ur $1,00 
Rateo. 45ma @ 14 VOLTS 



T1- 3/4 SIZE 
WITH WIRE LEADS 

1S3" DIA. (4 14mm) 

3 IDS VOLTS 3 tor $1.00 

Rated. 45(na @ 6 VOLTS 

g u 12 VOLTS 2 lor $1.00 
Ralcd: Sinn @ S VOLTS 

13 ia 24 VOLTS 3 for $1.00 

Rared 45fna @ 14 VOLTS 



CO-AX SWITCH 
( A/ B SWITCH) 



750hnlllN 
TWO 

7SotiniiOUT 
$3.50 EACH 





NEON W/ RESISTOR 

. DIRECT 

''^ — • OPERATION 
7 for $1,00 FROM 120 VOLT 



120V INDICATOR 



NEON INDICATOR. RATED 

120 V 1^3 W. MOUNTS IN 

S/18- HOLE . RED LENS. 

7E* EACH 

10 FOR $7.00 

100 FOB $S5.00 



METERS 

- 20 V.D.C. 

-20 VDC FULL SCALE 

FACEPLATE 
BATTERT TEST 
SET-UP AS 
INDICATOR 
tS.M EACH 

1 MA 

2 5/16'" SQUARE 
PANEL METER 
MOUNTS IN 
2 1/0- HOLE 
$S.50 EACH 

0-15 V.D.C, 

THIS a-V4" 
SQUARE METER 
MEASURES 
D-15 VDC. 
$4.50 EACH 



LINE CORDS 

TWO WIRE 



6' iSga TWO WIRE 
3 FOR $1 .00 

THREE WIRE 

18 INCH ISga THREE WIRE 

2 (or $1.00 
B FOOT IBsa THREE WIRE 

$3,04 EACH 



SWITCHES 

MINI-PUSH BUTTON 





METAL OXIDE 
VARISTOR 

| f °^ 2 FOR 

Q.E, « V822A12 '" 

SO VOLTS. NOMINAL DC 
VOLTAGE 5/a" DIAMETER, 



I Jf 



S.P S.T. MOMENTARV 
NORMALLY OPEN 

1/4" auSHING 

3S« EACH 10 FOR $3,15 

100 FOR $30,00 

SPECIFY COLOR: RED. BLACK 

WHITE. GREEN, TELLOVK 



KEY SWITCH 



S,PS,T. 

4 AUPS@ 125 VAC 
KEY REMOVES BOTH 
POSITIONS $3.50 EA 



c 




LIGHTED 
PUSH BUTTON 



RED LIGHTED 120 VAC 

10 AMP, SPS.T, 
"POWER" PRINTED ON 
FACE MOUNTS IN 
7/a- SQUARE HOLE , 
$1.^ EA 10 FOR$13.S0 



PREE! FPtt- free! SEND FOR OUR NEW^EEl 40 PAGE CATALOG free' "ftee; ^^es/ 



2-WAY CAR STEREO SPEAKER 
SYSTEM 

THESE SPEAKERS COME IN HEAT 
RESISTANT ABS PtASTIC CABINETS, 
IDEAL FOR CAR INTERIORS WHERE 
HEAT CHANGE OCCURS . . 
POWER RATING; 15 WATT NOM 
45 WATT MAX, 
EACH SYSTEM CONTAINS A 4 INCH 
10 OZ, WOOFER AND 2 INCH TWEETER 

SPECIAL PRICE $36.00 PER PAIR 




KEY 
ASSEMBLY 

5 KEY 

$1.00 
EACH 

CONTAINS 5 SINGLE.POLE 
NORMALLY OPEN SWITCHES 

MEASURES 3 3I4" LONG 



6 KEY 



$1.25 
EACH 



CONTAINS 6 SINGLE-POLE 

NORMALLY OPEN SWITCHES, 

MEASURES 4 1/4" LONG, 

^6 KEY 

ADDING 

MACHINE 

STYLE SWITCH 

ASSEMBLY 

CONTAINS tS 
SINGLE.POLE 

NORMALLY OPEN SWITCHES 

(PUSH TO MAKE}, 

K.SO EACH 




JOYSTICK 



PRECISION 
DEVICE... 
CONTAINS 4 
SOK CENTER 
TAPPED ALPS 
POTS $4,75 » 




POTS 

2K 10 TURN POT 

SPECTROL 
•MODa4-7161 
$5,00 EACH 



SLIDE POTS 

500 K linear taper 

2 7/0" LONG 
1 ^r TRAVEL 
75* EACH 

DUAL 100K 

AUDIO TAPER 

3 1/2" LONG 

2 1/2- TRAVEL $1,50 EACH 



RELAYS 

6 VDC RELAY 

MINIATURE D.PO T 
3 AMP CONTACTS 
FUJU1TSU • FBR32IDO0e 
$1.75 EA 10/ IS.DD 



MINIATURE 
6 VDC RELAY 

SUPER SMALL 
SPOT RELAY; 
GOLD COBALT 
CONTACTS. 
RATED 1 AMP AT 30 VDC; 
HIGHLY SENSITIVE. TTL 
DIRECT DRIVE POSSIBLE. 
OPERATES FROM 4,3 TO 
E V, COIL RES, 220 OHM, 

1 3/16- ' 13/32- ' T/IS- 

AROMAT a RSD-ev 

$1,S(I EACH 

10 FOR $13,50 



13 VDC RELAY 

CONTACT: S,P,N,C, 
10 AMP @ 120 VAC 
ENERGIZE COIL TO 
OPEN CONTACT , . 
COIL; 13 VDC 650 OHMS 
SPECIAL PRICE $1.00 EACH 



4 PDT RELAY 

* 14 pin styla 
- 3 amp comacts 

* 24 voll d.c. or 

120 volt a,c cf^il 
■ Usod but tully tnled 
$1.70 EACH 
sp«^r(y call vciltago 
LARGE QUANTITIES AVAILABLE 

^OCVaia FDfl RELAT iOt 



COMPUTER 

GRADE 

CAPACITORS 

1700 mid. 150 VDC $2.00 

2 1/2" DIA ^ 4 3/4" HtGHrt^fc 

3,(00 mtd. C^S 

40V DC $1.00 I 

1 3/8" DIA, t3" HIGH 1^ 

6,400 mid. D 

«WVDC $2,50 li_|| 

1 3/B" DIA »4 1/4" HIGH 
le.OOO mid. 75 VDC $4.00 

2 1/2" DIA, " 4 1/2- HIGH 

M.OOO mid, IS VDC 

2" DIA . 2 1/2" HIGH $2,00 

£2,000 mid, «D VOC 

2" DIA, - 6" HIGH $3,00 
24,000 mid, 3D VDC 

1 3/4" DIA, ■ 4" HIGH $3,50 

31,000mld. 15 VDC 

1 3/4- DIA, • 4" HIGH $2,50 
72,000 mid. 15 VOC 

2- DIA . 4 HIGH $3,50 

180,000 mfd.atSV 

2 1/2- DIA < 4 1/2" HIGH $1.50 
CLAjiai TO nT c/VACiTont sot « 



BLACK LIGHT 
(ULTRAVIOLET) 

G.E.»F6T5aL $2 JO aich 



EDGE 
CONNECTORS 

— mtrntilttTitiitintitiiinit — 

ALL ARE 156" SPACING 

IS PIN GOLD 

SOLDER EYELET $1,75 EACH 

15/30 GOLD 

SOLDER EYELET $3.00 EACH 

18/36 GOLD 

SOLDER EYELET $2.00 EACH 

22/44 GOLD 

SOLDER TAIL (P.C, STYLE | 
$2.50 EA 10 FOR $2250 



BLACK PLASTIC 
CASE 




BLACK PLASTIC ENCLOSURE 
ADJUSTABLE HEIGHT PROM 
1 S3" TO 2 93"; WIDTH 
6.S5"; DEPTH 8" BUILT-IN 
STAND OFFS FOR PC 
BOARDS , FRONT AND BACK 
PANELS NOT INCLUDED 

$5.25 PER CASE 



POWER SUPPLY WITH PRE-AMP 




THIS SUPPLY WAS USED TO POWER 
AN STRACK/CASSETTEUNIT.IT 
WILL SUPPLY APPROX. 18 VDC AND 
INCLUDES A SMALL PRE-AMP TO 
BOOST SIGNAL LEVEL 
RCA PLUGS FOR LINE IN/OUT, 



$4,50 EACH 



LaE.D.'S 

STANDARD JUMBO 
DIFFUSED 

BEO 10 FOR $1,50 
GREEN 10 FOR $2.00 
YELLOW 10 FOR $2.00 

A FLASHER LED 

^ 5 VOLT OPERATION 
■ RED JUU80 SIZE 
Jf $1.00 EACH 



I 



BIPOLAR LED 

2 FOR (1 70 

SUBHM1NI LED 



'E- 



073" - 098- 20 MA AT l.rsv 

RED 10 FOR $1.00 

2tX] FOR $13 00 

GREEN 10 FOR $1.50 

LED HOLDERS 

TWO PIECE HOLDER a 
FOR JUMBO LED — 

10 FOR <$« 200 FOR $1000 



a 



PHOTO-FLASH 
CAPACITORS 

35 MFD 330 VOLT 

1" » 5/a- DIA '^^~" 
45t EACH... 

10 FOR S4,tM 

170 MFD 330 VOLT 

1 1/8- - 7/8" 
3 FOB $1,50 10 FOR $7 00 

750 MFD 330 VOLT 

2" HIGH ^ 1 1/4" DIA, 
$1,25 EACH 10 FOR $11. 00 



TOLL FREE OfiDERS ONLY 
1,800 826-5^32 
(ORDER ONLY! 

ALASKA. HAWAII, CALIF 
ORINPOHMATION 
(J131380 BOOO 




OUANIITIES LIMITED 
MINIMUM ORDER SIO.OO 
USA S2 50 SHIPPING 
FOREIGN ORDERS; 

INCLUDE SUFFICIENT 

SHIPPING 
CALIF RES ADD 6'. 
NO COD' 



CIRCLE 73 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



i £ 



The Deluxe II" 

Is The Ultimate In UHF Sine Wave 
Converter Technology 

PC BOARD & PLANS $20.00 

With purchase of COMPLETE SET OF PARTS 4 ENCLOSURE 




The latest state dVpe art sf^ctronics coWmined with thg::£xc«)lci(fce% printed circuit 
manufacturing Q^ates this high performance UHF Siiie wave Ou\V<0leT kit that outper- 
forms the imitations by a long shot. ,^ Ijf^ 
Engineered for reliable stabilityiand outstanding receptmn clarity, uninterrupted modulated 
audio and fully illustrated instru4tions with tte amateur in mind. 

^§. J|f- ^ TOLL FREE 

BETA ELECTRONICS, 1700 E. DESERT INN RoSfo, SUITE 222, LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, 89109 1-800 "782-2701 

PLEASE 
PRINT CLEARLY 

SEND THIS 
ORDER FORM 



QTY 


DESCRIPTION OF rfEM 


COST 
EACH 


SHIPPING 
EACH 


TOTAL 




PC BOARD, PLANS, PARTS & ENCLOSURE 


$152.99 


$4.95 






PARTS * ENCLOSURE ONLY 


$132.99 


$4.95 






PC BOARD & PLANS ONLY 


$30.00 


$1.50 




GRAND 


$ 



ADDRESS . 



Cmr /STATE/ZIP. 



QUANTmr DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE 
. ORDER DATE 



□ visa QmST. CARD CARD NO. 



MO. DAY VR. 



.EXP. DATE. 



FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY MONEV ORDERS OR (^ERTtRED CHECKS PREFERRED 



PeRSOMAL CHECKS ALLOW 4 WEEKS FOA DEUVERY ' 



CIRCLE 7a ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



CPU'S & 8^ 
SUPPORT ^ 

CHIPS 825& 



aoeoA 



fi9« 

2.75 
5.75 

does s% 

AMD23QI S9b 



l-SQ 

3.aj 

1.76 
2Jfi 
1.90 
350 
BS5 

14 S5 



SHIFT 

REGISTERS 

MU1402 1 75 



8212 
SZtG 



am 

0237 
R749 



19,95 
4.E0 

5.» 

eUQ &7S 

2HUCPLI 3.76 

ZBOASld 

ZfflCTCA 

TMSS9Z7NL 9.96 

£375 1SS6 

eS45 1336 

6?ID 2 50 

fia» 2-16 

8356 B » ,^ 

DISC t*t89 

& DRIVERS 8130 
Cantmllsrs 



t2:efi 

3.?fi 
3.75 



SCR's 





t.EA 


eA 


35A 


110A 


100 


.36 


.40 


XM 




zx 


40 


.60 


i.eo 


O.DO 


HX 


.SO 


.70 


2,40 


12.0) 



1.00 3.60 15.00 



TRIAC's 



EPOXV GLASS VECTOR BOARD 



PRV 


lA 


10A 


2SA 


100 


.35 


.SO 


1.40 


30! 


.50 


.90 


1.90 


WJ 


.70 


1. 00 


2.E0 



eOO 1.00 1.20 3.6 



Uhti«o 

MM1*J4 

MWHBe 
MMSK7 



175 

3&S 

la 

250 
2.50 
2.50 



1771 . 
1791. 
1793. 
1795. 
I7EF7. 



16.50 
2S.0O 
3B.CC 
4S.(X) 
45.00 



INTER 

FACE 

a 

DRIVERS 
Sb 
£5 

2X 
2fO 
2.S 
2.W 
300 
3.00 
2JS 



C/MOS 



Bi3] 
BBS 
eS34 
3837 
3333 
MtAHXJ tm 

amviL s% 
MME^si 9 so 
MMsaee 2 so 

TRI$CQB 3.95 



ROM'S 
27ie ^ ^ 395 



RAM'S 



2732 

2764 

htCff761 

B2S3 

B2Sia} 

ECS115 

BIS12J 

i«331) 
S2S123 
.S2S130 
3e2SA3 
AM92I4C 
a2S6-6 

{7418a«^l 
74S3S7 
74S*7* 



7.Sfi 
9.9G 
19.9G 
19G 
2.9$ 
4.00 

135 

196 
1.916 
3.00 
29S 



21102 3 
93L422 
2101 1 
2111AL 
2an-* 
2114 3 
21*7 3 
TM53409 

u};4o:€P 

iVI»;4Cff7 3 

M9<>«S6-I1 1.9& 
41ie-3 1.10 

4116-1% 160 



6.95 
165 

1 10 
1 60 
4^5 
4,^ 
1.96 
t96 



5101E 
2S104^ 

1TO 8264(41642 S.75 

395 5e725iM*:'S802l fi-S 



Z96 

260 

650 



6S000L8 
$50.00 



CRYSTALS 

2.000 6 1>H 

3 000 S0C4 

3 5?9 10 000 

4.000 1BDC0 

5 000 tB.432 

6.1X0 33.000 

2.95 ea. 



50PlNnieBONO0N«ECTORS -53.25 

40PrN RIBBON CABLE CQNK 43-00 

34 PtN RIBSOM CABLE CONN ^-00 

lOPlNRISBON CABLE CONN .. .- *1 50 



«IKI 
<0I7 
«iU 

40i» 



«?0 
4071 



4&SI 



X«C«l - 

j^coa - 

MCM 
74COt 
J4C1Q 
T4CK 
74C2I3 
7'iaa - 

;4C4i 

T4CM - 

74CT1 . 

7^CH - 
74CH 

7^cw ■ 

T4CM 
74Cl^ 

J*C157 

JlClil 

?^cia • 

7<C17J 

J4C174 
J4C17B 
74Cl« 
74CHt 
7«*M - 
74C914 
74C«1 - 
74CIJ 



74S SERIES 74374 

74ses 

.30 



74SM] 
74502 
74503 
74S04 
74S06 
74S08 
74S10 

74S1S 
74S20 
74S30 
74S32 



.70 

1.25 
.60 
1-90 



74see 

74Sa9 
74Sn2 
74S133 
74S1K 
74S13S 1-25 

745139 1-1D 

745140 KTO 
74S1S1 1-25 
74S153 
74S167 
74£15S 



50 

1-10 



.96 
1.25 
1.25 



74S161 1.75 

74S163 1.40 

74S1&9 1.76 

7*5174 1.40 

745175 140 

745132 1.75 

74S1W 1,10 

745240 1.00 

745241 1.W 
74S257 1 ,30 
74S2SS 1 ,30 
74S26Q 1-50 
74S280 1.75 
745373 2-2fi 



LINEAR CIRCUITS 



25 wan Infra R«j Pulw rSG2006 &quiv > 
Laser Deode 4 Spec sheet included) $124.95 



2N3B20PFrr. 
2N S457 N FET 
2N2646 UJT. 

m 9O0 TRIGGER DIODES 
2N 602S PROG, UJT 



& .45 

$ ,4S 

$ ,45 

4,''S1.00 

« .65 



D15C CAPACITORS 

1UF 16V ID SI DO ICO $800 

OTUf^SV 16 J1 00 100 J&OO 



PR I NTED CIRC U IT SO AHD 
' 6- DOUBLE SCDCDEPOXY BOAflOEO '/.^^THlCK 
Mm. .5.'S2.«) 



TOGGLE '^^ ^^^'^ ^ ^*' 

SWITCHES JMP DPOT CLUTIROFJii 



IN4148{!N914) tS/1.00 



L1411-1R DETECTOR 3/*1.D0 

FP 100 PHOTO TRANS * -50 

REDLED's.J" E.-*1-00 

YEL, GftEEN Of AMBEfl LARGE lED's .2". . C'SI.OO 

RED-GREEN BIPOLAR LED * ,90 

RED-VELLCW BIPOLAR L£0 % .90 

MLEOSeiRLED * .75 

M.RD14B PHOTO DARL XTOH S .SO 

MCT20PT0 ISOLATORS , J .60 

4N260PTO ISOLATOR S ,70 

1 WATTZENERS; 3,3, 4.7, 5-1, S-6, fi-B, 
g-2,9.1, 10, 12. 15. ia, m22V,. 6/$1-00 



DAQCHEa - 

TLoea cp - 

TLD6* CN - 
TLOM - 1 5( 
LM201 - 75 
LM»V,'748 . 
LM307 - .X 
LM308 « 
LM310 M 
LM311 K 
LMJia 7E 
IM319 9. 
LM324 EC 
LrW(2S - S 
LWMB - .K 
LF361 - .» 
LF353 - .» 



4 9Ei IF3K - 

.H LM368 

1,U LM»1 

\ I.IV137D 

i LM377 

' ,30 LIV(380 

I LMSS 

i Ll^3tt 

LM3a7 

1 LM333 
i LMS6E 
i LMSK 



7nCH 

74tC - 



SO 



1.00 741CV 

- .50 747 

- 1.75 CATSa - l.Tfi 

- 1.60 Lh1131D - 1.60 

- 160 1466 - U 

- -B6 t4fia - .60 

- 1.» LMiaoa - 1,75 

- .BE LM2W1 - 95 

- 1.3 CA3018 - 195 

- .75 CAJ]7a - 1 5fl 

- 34 CA30BE 75 

- .66 AP^TCQiQ - 4.95 
2.S [;LA314q 1 GO 

H 3900 - ,« 

ia 413& - .» 

S N5U6A - 1,60 

IS Deans - 1.75 

- .40 W3BCC - 390 
36 LM130eO - -9S 



20KV250MAQIODE- 



FULL 

PRV 


^AVE BR 

2A GA 


tOGE 

2SA 


100 




■: 40 


200 


SO 1'30 


2 20 


4D0 


1 DO ^65 


3 30 


500 


1 3Q *90 


4 4q. 



.^1.90 



FLftT 
RIBBON 
CABLE 

GRAY 
28 gou^e 

40 conductor 

.90/ ft 
26 conductor 

.60/(1 

BOcortductor 
1.00 



DIP SWITCHES 

CTS2C6 < 4 POSITION 75 
CTSSOfr ^ 7 POSITION 95 
CrS^. B 8 POSITION .3£ 
CTS?«.10 10 COSfTlOhf T 25 



DIP 
SOCKETS 20 PIN ,25 



SPIN .10 
14 PIN .12 
16 PtN .15 
13 PIN .20 



22PIN .25 
24 PIN .25 
2BPIN .35 
40 PIN .40 



MO. 30 WIRE 

WRAP WIRE 

SINGLE 

STRAND 

10O'...*1.40 



DB CONNECTORS 

DB^ . K.m Da25p - &2.75 
0B4S . 3.00 DB26S - 3.60 
HOODS- 1.10 HOOOS- !.26 



S P 1200 ohm coll 
.36 

O.P. 40Oohmcoa 
1.S 



SILICON POWER RECTIFIERS 



?4aA 

600 

$» 

1700 

t^OO 

laoo 

26 CO 



PflV 
'00 


lA 
05 


14 


\2h 
36 


.90 


125 A 

4 26 


400 


.06 
OS 
11 


2E 

io 


.60 
BO 


1 30 

''l 60 
2,00 


6 26 
6.S0 

sso 


eoo 


13 


35 


1,00 


250 


■050 



1 25 3 Ofl 12 50 



REGULATORS 



I.M338K 

tMJlTT . . 

70.05,70.1! 

41MD % .SG 

723 S .60 

320T5. 12 150.34 » W 



.W.50 
tl.OO 
* 40 



.»1.95 
,*1.75 



LM3J7T. .. . 
323K(1A1«&]. 

LMXfiG fl .75 

3WT.S. 0. B. 3. 12. 

15, I8or24V A B5 
UAS1*12 . IZVJftO 95 



TANTALUM 

.22UF35V 5/$1.00 
.471JF36V 6,'SI.OO 
.6SUF35V S.'M.OO 

luFarv 5/51.00 

2.2L1F20V 6/^1.00 

3.3UF20V 4/51.00 

4.7LtF35V 4/f1.00 

S.BUFaOV 4/51.00 

10LiF20V - * .40 

22UF10V - S .30 



CAPACITORS 

15UF16V 3/51.00 

30UF6V 

33UF 10V 

47UF20V 

esuF'iev 

120UF6V 
200UF20V 
150UF 16V 
330UF 10V 



5/*t.00 
5 .40 
5 85 
51.00 
% ,75 
51.75 
*1.30 
51.75 





■Ifi'lMckwitl' 


MO- 


ipacirtg 




4 


V X 


ti'.'/' 




$1.95 




14 PIN HEADERS , 




...,3/*l.00 


24PI^ 


HEADERS 
HEADERS . 

EDGEBOAR 






75 


40PI^ 








sop^^ 


DCO 


MN„ ,. 


3,95 


26 PIN EDGE80.ARDC0NN.. . . 


2,50 


M PIN ANGLE CONN . 




3.% 


20 PIN RIGHT ANGLE CONN. . . , 


2,25 


TRANSISTOR SPECIALS 


iMMJPNP0ET0 6 






. 1 M3 


Jh'«t*,PNPIiETOS 






3 *1 EO 


HEPGffl14 PNPGETUiJ 




t K 


T1P111 




t » 


TIP lift 


ttK 


IMEUhPN SWITCH iHQPOWift 


H.flS 


MftF «5M CM «F TRANSISTOR NPN 


* J* 


2h37?;hF^&1Q3 






MO? 


3N4$iVPhiPS'Ta] 






*ll» 


T|P364PhP& 








* » 


2FJl22IHWJSiTOia 






1C.*1» 




F-NP^i TO IS, 






.1 HLOD 


?!43(K« 






t CO 


3k|:»^HPNSi 


TO 55 






»'I1.00 


S^MOSPNPSiTOK 






1 » 


21«iMpnpSiTO;20 






1 » 


TJPaiBhPWS. 


iOSO 






$ HI 


Tipaauphr-s-foaa 






( u 


TlP3*P^P5> 








1 as. 


ClPIJIWJffSi 


jflJ 






1 GO 


TIP 14! 


HPt+S-L-gT 






i1 CO 


&Ui2<X 










fi n 


DPSjtm tKjAL T'avfrm.DAii 


L 


i3« 




TTLIC SERIES 




7400 


17 


7472 


30 


741312 


60 


7401 


17 


7473 


.W 


741 EJ 


60 


7402 


17 


7474 


32 


74 le* 


EO 


7403 


17 


7475 


,40 


74166 


€0 


7404 


24 


747Q 


36 


74166 


70 


7406 


24 


7490 


46' 


74170 


1.60 


74« 


29 


7«3 


50 


74173 


:?6 


7407 


29 


7496 


55 


74174 


66 


740e 


34 


74« 


,35 


74t75 


60 


74Ca 


.le 


74BS 


1.60 


74(76 


75 


7410 


17 


7490 


.35 


74180 


t.30 


74IT 


22 


7491 


46 


74)82 


46 


7412 


Xt 


7492 


45 


74190 


70 


74 13 


% 


7493 


36 


74191 


75 


7414 


45 


74^4. 


60 


^41 a3 


79 


7410 


25 


7496 


.56 


741M 


^ 


7417 


?5 


7496 


«0 


74196 


4S 


74i0 


17 


74107 


30 


74196 


71 


7425 


J5 


74116 


1» 


74221 


1.00 


7426 


26 


74T2I 


.S 


74273 


BS' 


7427 


:2E 


741 22 


-a 


74279 


GO 


7430 


.17 


74123 


.42 


742M 


66 


7432 


27 


74126 


.46. 


74365 


65 


7437 


27 


74146 


.60 


?43<7 


K 


7438 


27 


7414S 


t.io 


74390 


90 


7440 


17 


74 ISO 


t,1.0 


7B334 


176 


7441 


.75 


74151 


50 


7sas 


1 60 


7442 


.45 


74153 


.40 


75492 


T.dfi 


7446 


66 


76164 


[.10 


^&i^ 


7h 


7446 


m 


741S6 


» 


Kffl 


75 


7«7 


66 


74167 


.M 


aT2fi 


100 


7W8 


■«i 


741 SO 


.Wi 


0TS7 


90 


7450 


17 


74161 


.66 


6796 


.90 



74LS SERIES 



74iLS0a .20 

T*LSPi .20 

?4iS0: 23 

r4|.Stt3 23 

741S04 .23 

74LUK .S 

74LSn .23 

74L5Ca 2S 

74LS3D J3 

74LS11 .a 

74L513 35 

74L513 ,45 

J^LSH 40 

J4I.&1*, 3fi 

74L£2g .33 

74LS21 3$ 

1M.S32 a 

74LSJS 35 

7«.S77 12 

MLSTB *a 

^41630 ,22 

T4LS33 75 

74LS^7 X 

74LS3B X 

7*1540 26 

7<LS4J 44 

74LS47 «9 

74LS&1 £2 

7'iLS!l4 » 

74LS73 .» 

74LS74 » 

74L275 » 

7^1^76 35 

74L5fil .BO 

7'*LSK » 

NLSffi 40 

I4I.SS0 « 

741.392 » 

74L<i$3 bO 

74C.S99 .H 

74LSia7 at 



74LS1W » 

74L5117 39 

741S11J *!i 

74LS114 U 

7iM.sm ?s 

T44.S1S 45 

74LS1» 4 

T4LSm S5 

74LS136 .4i 

74LS33I7 K 

74tS13i BO 

74LSia ES 

741S147 1 H 

74iS151 M 

74LS153 W 

74i51i( 1 » 

74LS156 « 
TtLSiGS 
74LS1S7 
741. SUSS 
74tS1M 
74I;S1S1 
74L£ie2 
74LSiej 

7^LS164 H 

r4i.siifi » 

TALSIB 176 

74L5i7fi tJO 

74LSI73 B6 

74L5174 GlF 

74L517fi SI 

74LS1I1 1» 

MLSiH eo 

74t.S'iai n 

74LS1U .7S 

74LS1SI 75 

74LS1S4 AG 

741.SI1I6 A 

?4L5l« 75 

74LSl«T J5 



74I..SS1 76 

74LS?40 Jd 

74LS»i as. 

74L52«I UK 

T4L5?U K 

74L57M SO 

741S746 Ija 

74LS24J 75 

74L5?U K 

74lS»1 » 

74LS3E3 5& 

74LS2fi7 B& 

74LSZ5a U 

74L53CI9 140 

74LS2tt 1*1' 

MLS273 I 16 

74LS379 4e 

74LS3V] 1 U 

74LS2e3 a& 

74LS29a 7£ 

74LS29] H 

74L52H K 

74LSX2CI 2 00 

71LS3Z3 3 50 

7419306 .H 

74i;,S»e ED 

74t.£»7 80 

74L63eS £0 

74L53ra H 

74«.S:}74 K 

74LS177 1 H 

T4lSJ» 45 

1H.S3X 1.10 

7415383 1 IP 

74VS»6 2H 

?+l,S4» 1 S3 

741SAC 3 OQ 

BUS'S? 1 10 

BlLSH 1 10 



MULTI TURN TRIM POTS 

50 OHM SK 
IMOHM tOK 
500 OHM 5QK 3/$2.00 
lODOOHM 500K 



POSTAGE HATES 

ADD 10% FOH ORDERS UNDER «25 00 

ADD 5ft FOfl OftDERS eETvVEEW »2S 00 ft 160.00 

ADD 3% FOR ORPERS AflOVE 150 OO 



TERW5F0B CAWflfiiDGE. MASS SEND CHECK SEMO t 25 FQH OUH tlATALOG 

OR MONfY ORDER hftlWtMUNI TELEPHONE. ^EATUR-I^G mAHSiSEOFiS ft 

COP PURCHASE OFIDEfl Ofl CHAPGt tTOOO RECTIFIEFii 146 HAft4PSHinE 

MINIMUM WAJL OaPEP 16 00 ST . CAMBRIDGE. MA&S CH13S 



o 



Q 
< 

116 



SOLID STATE SALES 

P.O. BOX 74 D 

SOMERVILLE, MASS, 02143 



TEL (617) 547-7053 

WE SHIP OVER OVER 9^*4 

OF OUR ORDERS WITHIN 

H HOURS OF RECEIPT 

TOLL FREE 1-600343.5230 

FOR ORDERS ONLY 



^ ACTIVE ' 
RECEIVING 
ANTENNA 

Gives excellent reception, 
50 KHz to 30 IVlHz. 

New MFJ-10Z4 Active Bacelvfng 
Antenna mounts outdoors away from 
electrical nofse for maximum signal, 
Gives excellent reception of 50 KHz 
to 30 MHz signais. Equivalent to wire 
hundrecfs of feet iong. Use any SWL 
MW. BCB, VLF or Ham receiver. 

High dynamic range RF amplifier. 54 

ir. whip, 50 foot coax, 20 dB attenuator 

prevents receiver overioad. Switch be- 

■ tween two receivers. Select auxiliary or 

.active antenna. Gain control, "Oi^" 

■LED. Remote unit, 3x2x4 in. Control 

.6x2x5 in. 12 VDC or 110 VAC witti 

optional adapter, 

MFJ-1312, $9,95, 

MX 





■129 



Order from JiflFJ and try it. If not delighted 
return within 30 days for refund (less shipping)' 

0»e year unconditional guarantee. 

Order today. Call TOLL FREE 800-647-1800. 
Ciiarge VISA, MC. Or maii checl<, money order 

Write fo r free catalog. Over 100 products 
l>fJiailllBi=IJ ^;|, | l H rf.^gt:M. l 
Caii 601-323-5859 in f^iss., outside continentai 
USA, tech/order/repair info. TELEX 53-4590. 

ENTERPRISES, 
INCORPORATED 

V^Box 494, Mlaalsaippl Stato, MS 39762 

CIRCLE 46 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



MFJ 




CIRCLE 35 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Free Buyers Guide 



84 pages ol tfie latest in components, fools 
□nd instrurr>ents — a must lor DESIGNERS, 
instructors ond maintenance engineers. 



NEWZEKITHZXM 121 

High tegibilify 1 2" green phosphor monitor. 
1 6 Mfiz bandwidth, 

40 Of eo character ^nn. nt- 

setectable lull compafabillty . . $99.95 



SPECIALS 

25 PIN OS PLUG AMP P/N 205737-2 
Any Qunntity $1 .97 



9 PIN DB PLUG RIGHT ANGLE FOR 
-^^^ HOME COMPUTERS & GAMESI 

"- AMP P/N 207456-2 

Any Quanfily $.85* 



RESISTOR BUYOUT 

" MOST STANDARD VALUES 

Vt WATT 5% RESISTORS 1 OHM TO 1 MEG OHM 

2KMIN BUYl K HIN. PER VALUE 

$6.50 . , Par 1 .000 




UHF/VHF Conversion 

Kit - with 

Genuine Mitsumi ^ ^ ^ ^ 

Tuner $11 9.95 



CALL OUR HOT LINK 

IN CALIF. (7I4)S27-2554 

OUTSlDf GAL <SOO) 854-e660 

SCR ELECTRONICS CENTER 

5303 Lincoln Ave., Cypress. CA 9O630 



CIRCLE 5 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



CABLE TV 



CONVERTERS 
DESCRAMBLERS 

Largest Selection 
of Equipment Available 

$ Buy Warehouse Direct & Save $ 



•^ 



36 channel 

converter 

$4595 




36 Channel 

wired remote 

converter 

only 

$88^5 



Send $2 for complete catalog 
of converters and unscrainblers 

Add 3^0 shipping — Mich, rcriidcnu add 4^» sales lax 



C&D Electronics, Inc. 

P.O. Box 21. Jenison. MI 49428 
C616) 669-2440 



Burglar/Fire Alarms 




prctfE|t5 



CCTV 
controls 
alarm syste 
passive infrareds 
motion detectors 
ultrasonic detectors 
magnetic contacts 
smoke detectors 
vehicle alarms 
accessories 
remotes 
tools 



>«nnountain west^" 

4215 N. 16th Street Dept. RE-5 
Phoenix, A2 85016 
1-800-528-6169 toll-free 



CIRCLE 6 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



SATELLITE TV RECEIVER KIT!!! 

It's not ready yet, but we guarantee it will be revolutionary in size and 
price. Send or inquire for preliminary information. Priced below $350.00. 
Available in April. 
LSS-1 less than $350.00 




DIGITAL MULTIMETER 
MIC-6000Z 




^^ 



h^ 



3 'A Digits 

DC 0.5% Accuracy 

DCA and ACA up to 10A 

OHM up to 20 IVi OHM 

Audible Continuity Test 

Diode Check 

Leads and Battery Included 



The MIC-6000Z is a professional Multimeter at 

an inexpensive price. 

; 6000Z worKS up to 1000 hours on a common battery, also can withstand 1 000 
VDC loads. Resistance ranges are protected up to 400 VDC. For your added 
convenience the MtC-6000Z has a built-in 10 amp current capacity, so you don't 
need an accessory shunt. 

MIC-6000Z Assembled SS9.95 

Carrying Case S 9.95 



UHF T.V. 
PREAMP 

Features: 

25 dB gain! 
Kit 


O08 

UHF ^ UHF 
In Oul 


U U 



Your reception will dramatically improve! 

This unit will enable you to pull in signals 

you never knew were there! 

For both Indoor and outdoor use. Input and 

output impedance 75 ohm. No adjustment! 

Easy assembly. 

JH-0 Kit S22.9S 



AMATEUR MICROWAVE 

Receiver System 

1.9-2.5 GHZ 

90 day 
warranty on 

PS-5!!! 

MICROWAVE 

RECEIVER : 

SYSTEM 

* Commerdal grade construclion 

* Sturdy Parabolic aluminurn relleclor antenna 

* High gain 50 db! 

* Line oi sigM distance 45 mites! 

* Complete system, power supply, cable, assem- 
bled reflector anlenna, and downconvener 

■ Oownconvarter mounted in attratlive cabinet, 

PS-5 A*ftembl«J , St09.95 

Kit Form S 79.95 





,f»- 



Digital Multimeter 

. . - .. M1C-3300A 

' r 'Kit Form • 3n Digits 

• DC -5^ Accuracy 
• DCA up 10 TO AmpB • OHM up to ZO M OHIUI 
• hiFe measurement • FIOBtirig decimal point 
■ Leads * battery included • Easy instructions 
A higti quality Digitei Meter Kit at an aHordable 
price. Edjcationai and enjoyabie to build, tt^e MIC 
3300 A is a high quality meter for ail hobbyists and 
maintenance worl^. 

MIC-3300A Kll Form S59.36 

Carrying Case $ 9.95 



R.F. MODULATOR 

Combine both audio and video output onto 
channel 3 or 4 of your T.V. set 
Single I.C. chip (MC 1374) makes for quick 
and easy assembly. Single adjustment con- 
trol! A must for every video recording or 
computer enthusiast. 
VH-0 Kit i19.95 



AMATEUR 

MICROWAVE RECEIVER KIT 

1.9-2.5 GHZ 



h+hA^^^^' 



PS-1 
PS-! 



Assembled 32 element antenna . . . 
20 dB gain microwave receiver kit 
with variable power supply kit — 
Compiete pacloge PS-1 & PS-2 . . 
Mounting Hsrdwsrv Included 



tes.oo 



Microwave Preamp!!! 



NEW 

Kit 



Use with PS-3 Kit. Adds 20-25 db gain to 
boost reception distance. 

• Low Noise 

• High Gain 

• Can be used with all existing 
stop sign board receivers!!!! 

• 1.9-2.5 gHZ Freq. Range 
PS-4 $34,95 







SEI, Inc. 

912 W. Touhy, Park Ridge, IL 60068 



lUinols Reslflents 

(312) 5$4-0104 
Orders Only, Toll Free # 
(SOO) 323-1327 



Minimum order&^15.D0. Add 1 0% ship- 
ping on orders under $35-00. Orders 
over $35.04), add 5%. Illinois resjdenis 
odd 6^ Sales Tax, CMalog - (1.00 
Visa and MasterCard Acceptable 



> 

-< 




CIRCLE 61 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



rwi 



^f/^ FORMULA INTERNATIONAL INC. 

^^- -^* 12603 Crenshaw Blvd., Hawthorne, CA 90250 

For information (213) 973-1921 > Orders Only (outside Calif.) (800) 672-8758 



pineapple 

The Alternative! The Compatible! 
The Affordable! 48K Color Computer Kit! 

FEATURES: 

* Fully compatible with Apple® 11+ * Built in 2-watt amplifier for realistic 

* Singleboard for easy assembly sound effect with volume control 

* Popular 6502 MPU for large * 8 on board peripheral connectors 
amount of software for expansion 

* Game paddle connector on both * 14 key numeric key-pad 
sides of case * 5-amp switching power supply 

Easy to assemble! All connponents are clearly silk-screened on the high quality double-sided 
mother board. All integrated circuits, IC sockets, peripheral connectors, keyboard, switching 
power supply and the professional high impact plastic case are included. 




(please add 5% shipping and handling) 



51/4" DJSC DRIVE FROM (guenTig) 

100% Made In USA 100% Apple and Pineapple" Compatible 
50% Faster Seeking Time Than Apple Disk II Drive! 

• 1 Year Full Warranty 

• 40 Tracks 

• One of ttie Most Quiet Drives 

• Color and Shape same as ttie 
Disk II Drive 

Disk Drive $285.00 

Controller Card $ 65,00 

Controller Card with 13 Sector, 16 Sector Auto Select $ 85.00 




The APPLE II LOOKALIKE COMPUTER CASE 



Made vifith high impact plastic. 

Color and shape are 
compatible wWh the APPLE II 
Buy while they last 
$150 ea. 

Keyboard not included 
v^ith this price! 




# 



Model: API! 



6502 CPU MOTHER BOARD 

. • 48K on board RAM (41 1 6) 

• 12Kon board ROM (271 6) 

• Upper/lovi^ercase 

• Composite-video output 

• Apple II alternative 

• Size: 14'/a"x8y2" » w w •■ ■» ■■ n 

V' «■ ■„ m *B u^ ^ 



^ BB B M IB r^ Ml 

S S £ B 3 L- S' 




P.C. Board Only $99.00 63. Complete Component Pack $250,00 
GUARANTEED TO WORK! BUILD IT IN 2 HOURS! 



^ ^ # Big Savings On Peripheral Cards ^ # ^ 

Buy them in kit form. 
All cards APPLE II and PINEAPPLE compatible. 

80 column card kit S12D.DD EPROM wriler card kit 

Zeo CP/M card kit SU D.OD (For 2708.2716,2732,2764,2532) S89.S0 

1 6K RAM caid kit S49.50 Printer interlace card kit (For Epson or OW) S88 .50 

Disk controller card kit $59.50 New disk controller card kit 

RS232 Interface card kit ... . S95.00 (32. 3-3 auto select) 569.50 

16k RAM card (cable-less) kit S59.S0 PAL Color Encoder card (assembled) SBB.50 



HEAVY DUTY SWITCHING POWER SUPPLY 
for Apple II, AP-ir and Pineapple" Computers 

-I-5V at 5.0 Amp 

+1 2V at 2.5 Amp 
-5V at 0.5 Amp 
-12V at 0.5 Amp 
Size and mounting holes are same 
as the ones used In the Apple II 




Model: THB-43H 



$145.00 ea. 



APPLE 11+ COMPATIBLE KEYBOARD 



• LSI i<eyboard decoder 

• Upper/lower case function 



• Full ASCII code output 

• N-l<ey rollover function 

• LED ON/OFF indicator 




LKB-3600-N 
Keyboard Only $99. 00 EA. Plastic Case$35.00 EA. 



51/4" DISKETTE SALE 

Ail diskettes soft sector single-side double density with hub rings. 

10 pes, 100 pes. 

wabasK #m43a $21.50 $195.00 

\fert>atim* #m525-oi $26.50 $240.00 

SC0teK/3M #744D $26.50 $240.00 

ATHANA #475001 $19.50 $175.00 



^^ Inside Callfornls 
>?;'; Outilde Calif. (Incl. Maxtco A CanMa) 



Shipping & Handling Chaises 

Undei $50.00 Under $50.00 

Puf chase Purchase 

10* 5% 

15<Hi 10% 

25% J0% 



Minimum Order $1O.0O/Callt. ResldentB 
add 6.5* Sales Tax. Phono Orders Accepted 
an VISA or MC ONLY. NOC.O.D.'a. Prices sub- 
ject to change without notice. 



STORE HOURS 

MON-FRl— 10-7 

SAT— 10-6 



■Apple and Apple II are the trademark of APPLE COMPUTERS. INC. 



GtRCLE 76 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




CIRCLE 40 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



More BLOCKBUSTER BARGAINS!! 



Parallel, TTL Input I/O "Selectric"<^ 

TYPEWRITER / PRINTER 

Removed Iron workmg syslemg. [hesfi Jantas- ■i.'ll^ 

he rriactiJnes have built-in driver and decoder 

circuitry and take TTL level. 6-bil characJer, 
plus 4'bit hjnction rnpui signals. Easily driven 
by most any tnicfo. Use a typewriter (with add I 
repeal circuitry) or as a KSR I O printer or 
twth. Requires lt&.60Hztor typewnter motor, 
S VDC rctf TTL and 2-i VDC lor solenoids 
'Table Top" style case. Each "Selectric"' I/O 
machine is cornpleie and in operanonal condi- 
hon, Lnctudes schemalics, dala case. plaTen 
and ribtxin. 

Type Element SSI^OOv*. 




$399.00< 




l.'O Seleclric 9^99iWWea. 

Add Ka tar Pttttagmt VKj Hv<viq ■ Prf ■^lv(>^ on D«Vy«ri 

SAVEIlt Untested vefston of trie above, otherwise whole S gomplete. May requira some 
service $279.00 ea. 

Diablo Daisy Printer 

^ ^.^^Ml^l^^ ' P'9-™''«1. TESTED 4 Operational! 

If ^^^39^^ ' Uses Xerox Melal Wieejs or Plastic Wheels 

Onginal OEM Inlerfaoe (Diablo Interface) 
Requires = 1 5V fo 5A S 5VDC (a 5A 
PosiKonal access to M20 "Honz." 1 '48 "Venica!" 
135 5-WPWora Processing • USEDBYXEROX.WANG.SOTHERS 

Daisy Printer ■ Hea^ Duty Prititwheei Motor and 15" Ftarre 

These fabulous aaisy printers feature 36-40cps, 10 S 12 pitch as well as proportional 
space, and plottef capabilities. Only a power supply and interface are required lor full 
printer capability. Fully tested and operaliortal. ready id conltgure for the interlace ol 
your ctioice. Platen and lOdata irwluded. lii^# 

Forms tractor tor the above S 9S.(H) <te«E #*#* 

Spare P.C. Board Set (6 P.O. Cards) $279.00 $099ill0 

Spare Printwtieel carrier assembly S329.00 **! s'soo 

Iqw Packagmg and Horxtling 

We MlB New S LtoJ aOPPy DRIVES. DISK DWVES. PRINTERS, i MORE 31 BARGAIN PRICES" 
Write or Call for Our Latest Flyer NOWii' 



V<AREH0U5E 18 Or.inilf SI H aver (ill I M.iss 01830 
MAIL ORDERS Boi 201. Newton New Hampshire 03858 

-^ 617/372-8637 r^ 

Sorry No Colled CgIIs 
M.nstcrCiird 4 VIS* Accepted ^ -' 



roducts & 
eripherals '' 
nlimited 



CIRCLE 67 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



IZ'B&W MONITOR 




VIDEO 1 00 byAMDEK 

FACTORY $71195 

WARRANTY I W 



for APPLE 

16K RAM CARD 

Language Transparent 
COEX FACTORY Scn95 
WARRANTY DO 



5y4" Floppy 

DISKEWES 

All Certified-1 00% Guaranteed 

BOXof100...M49'"* 

Above with 

Hub Rings $169.00 



FLOPPY DISK DRIVE 



From Fourth Dimension Systems 

with •Track Zero Micro Switch 

• DOS 3.2.1 & DOS 3.3 

• CP/M and PASCAL 

DESIGNED *^^_„, 

FOR YOUR $9ft795 

APPLE" £Of 

Controller Card 

for above $99.00 



COEX 80-FT "p^rTn^t^^r'"^ 



• interface with Apple;" Centronics 
RS-232, lEEE-488 

• 9x7 Dot Matrix, 80 CPS, 
Bi-Directionai Printing ^ 

• 2K Buffered Memory ...^ 

• 80,96, 132 Columns, Graptiics " 
and Bioch; Printing 

• Selectabie Ctiar Pitcht, Line 
Spacing and Feed 

COEX Interface Card to APPLE $49.95 



$' 



299J 



95 



VISION-80® $94Q00 

80x24 Video Display Card ^*T^ 

Vista Computer Company's new Vision-SO board is a sophisticated 
yet easy to use video display card for the Apple'' computer. 



PARALLEL INTERFACE 

EPSON TO APPLE 

New From $J| 095 CABLE 
COEX *W INCLUDED 



PROTOTYPING CARDS 

forAPPLE.... $19.95 
forLB.M $49.95 



EXTENDER CARDS 

forAPPLE... $16.95 
forl.B.M...,.$19.95 



"Have You Kissed Your Computer Lately" 

Components Express » Inc 

^Sr 1380 E. Edinger • Santa Ana, Calif. 92705 • 714/558-3972 

Terms of Sale: Cash. Checks. Credit Cards. M.O., C.O.D. Calif, residents add 6% sales tan. 



CmCLE 68 ON FREE It^FORMATION CARD 




> 

-< 

CO 
03 

w 



119 



C3raymark Electronic Kits 

Quality Products for 18 Years 



TV Sound Enhancer 

"Stereo-like" sound from your TV. Hooks up 
between TV earphone jack and your stereo 
system. Includes all necessary parts, inter- 
connecting cables. PCB, and instructions. 

Order Model 150D Only $10.90 each 



'\\ -;■■ ■' 




Electronic Whooper Siren 



^ 



Powerful wailing sound from dual 
oscillator circuit. Use witti any alarm 
circuit. Battery operated. PCB, instruc- 
tions, and ail parts included. 



Order Model 11 OD 



Only $7,70 each 



Color Organ Control 






3 chiannels total 600w of pulsing 
lights with no direct connection to 
sound source. Separate control for 
each channel. AC operated. Parts, 
PCB, instructions all included. 



(Mw Model 1S2D 



Only $15.90 each 



TV Scrambler 



*rl<iy Jam the picture on your TV set. 
Tunable to all VHP stations. 30 foot 
range, battery operated. Comes 
complete with parts, instructions, and 
PCB, 



Order Model USD 



Only $3.96 each 



Complex Sound Generator 



^ 



Create sounds of phasor guns, sirens. 



J^^pVI train, prop plane, space ship, and 
^jiZJ more. Battery operated. Comes com- 



plete with parts, PCB, instnidkHis. 



Order Modd 1420 



Only $14.30 eadt 



MC & VISA ordars only call Toll Free 



800-854-7393 



CA residents add sales tax • We pay shipping on orders 
over S25.00, otherwise add S2.50, Sorry no COD. 

Graymark 



(In CA 714-540-5480) 



Send $1.00 for Catalog (over 60 Kits] 

(Refundable with !st Order) 



Box 17359 ■ Irvine, CA 92713 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



n 

o 
tr 

t- 
o 



UJ 

6 

< 

CE 






FlKfltH ilnhri EXTUCABlETV -^MiDDMCr iSm^RAAht] 
CHA14NEL.S OArtvi UhiF DIAL 



T^M ifptlBn 

Mfat* CAmO 



^^.^\ A M ViT Ft?fl ViOEO'TAHHO FKOU Ol PJ. F TVt 

wi pcu ta i^rogntn bo^t' jMf [pirr TV e 
lor l^iung cf\ irrp VCn — vnila fOJ 



d g«*at*_'?n t-r^ [ fttfcttf TV ^H^^ UHF 



No. ^28.95- 



NOW AYAfLABLE 
NEW TUNEABLE DELUXE MODEL CVU-IOQO 



*a4.9S,^ 



rSOHM UHFYMI ANTENNAS 




SRAHDNEWUHF 

VAitACTDR TUN ENS 






Sanyo ^OUft 

Ovtpui *24.95 w 



CiJf ter 0»Minny Pfii<n 



MlitumJ 

UMHl 
Output 



SPEAKER UBtHET 
Popular if*iV«r ciDlrwii; tor 
that* rimous h£HtM urmw TV 
clrculli. ' 



SGIBT 
9df noft 



M0.9S . 
'6.95 - 



34V CT, 400 ^Mi, 
U*d« in USA. 




1Q-4I *2.75*«, HDrmen *2.2S*t. 



aunn.us ukf-vhf 

VAIUCTOK TUNERS 
Th«H 1(jn*n; rvcfJ"* ill cNirv 
ml* I-9J, 'plui mklt»nd caMb 
chBnn«l> Af\a ftra f«rC*cl: l« 
hotrw-brMf TV 'Clrcull> tic 
Dulpul Frfeq. 4J MRlL Hwkup 




^mMruiwn 



wmtuTiHT Uwif M3^M. 



UHF 
TUHEn$ 

CvitiruciH 
TufM Uodfll 
45;MH1 Output 



Thty 






AC UNE CORDS 



5^-lU^ 



10 oaui}« wlq 
e 'I. rang cat 

Prittirlpp«d and lir^ntd andi 
Ic tEiy untUHillDri 

49»H. 



L Special Purchjsi 

' MV'21IN 

SltlTMlIf DMt 

1-V («•». 

io-in> mh. 



EH HICAC'^ i\ 

I4PI.434H 500p',.Hl*l. 

«3<S4.3«*M. lXOi]f..Hl*L 



O 



rapULM 
HicnowwE 



DELUXE 
IPEUtEl 

HMdiM ^ la 
1 oi. Cwunte yaQitti 

'1.88.. 

It lip '1.41 M^ 



KJPOtM IC'l 
K9P OUALITY 



w^ 



UC-1i}4» 
UC-tHO 
HC19U 



LU-7tlt 



Ctaailll PtiM« LMtMl Lddff 



nj. Slarw? DiKodar 



UKM miUI fWblOTMt 
S VcHt Piwiit* VolL R«g 
t V4ir P»i|h4 %^4Jt H«g 
13 Volt PoUtirt Vdt Aag. 
ia VfAl PojJtn* VcJt H4g 
K VOJl P«UFi4 VML n«4 



Rxtlil LHd Cipi WV— AxM UHt Cipi ~~i^ 

1D rnMAlAY 1-11 tJl ■>. TVH tnUaaiTir I'll %tt wa. 

IrilfleMV .,.,1-11 .BH ™*^*"^!iif-Lii jfl- 



iSaffiKtw .Itw. 



1701. 

iaaQFnM«3DV ..., 
■ St VII 



H«<tU4«'HV , 



i3«tfie4 1TIN. 









fnojEct 

SOKES 



■12.50 H 




CATV ' MATV ' VC« 
Ji cam - K db iKilaliHi 

iTMiirhirLjir "0.95** 



UHF - VHF - FK 
SPUTTER 




nFnv 

icK)p*i,a9*«- 



POPUUUI 

MISCEUAMEQLF^ MRT$ 
JIhMQDI DIcmM* 

iSrw ll.DD 

loorof.,,., MO 

14w 10K TlHiinbwtwl pMi 

1-12 ,... Jl 

U-Up.. ^ 

T0f«4dC' 730-12 ^ 

SO-Up JS 

THOldt-TS?^ -SB 

M'-Up. ,S 



ORDER NOW 

TOLL FflEE 
OUTSIDE CAUFOflNIA 

714-635^5090 

IH^DE CAUFOnNIA 



S 



R.F. 

ELECTRONICS "t^- 

1056 N. STATE COLLEGE BLVD., DEFT. H 
ANAHEIM, CALtEOFINIA«2aOe 



PERGONAL CHECKS HELD FOH CLEARANCE - HO hllNIUUU ORQER 
ALL PAepAJD OAOEAS 2 tB$ OR LESS ULIST IHCLUDE «.» SHIPPIKQ k HAHDLIMQ - SHIPPED SAME DAY RECEIVED 



^ 



120 



CIRCLE 65 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



(602) 266-9758 (602) 234-3026 

^ SURPLUS ^-w^ 

▼ Wholesale - Retail - Surp/us O 

Electronic Parts 
6835 N. 1 6th Str«M • Phoenix, AZ 85016 



The Most Unbelievahfe Electrolrtic Sale 


IriTlieUSA! 


AXIAL 


• 


HADIAL 


33/6 3 


12/1 00 


1000/10 


12/1 00 


10O.'6 3 


10/100 


< 


10/18 


30/1.00- 


ZZO/6.3 


ao/i.oo- 


47/18 


30/1.00' 


470/6 3 


10/1 00 


220/16 


26/1.00- 


220/10 


IS'1 00 


u 


470/16 


ZO/1.00' 


1000/16 


10/1.00- 


UJ 


47/25 


20/1.00* 


2200/16 


B/1.00' 


a. 


1 100 


15/100 


47 '35 


12-1 OD 


M 


47/100 


5/100 


220/36 


10-100 


O 


100/100 


4/1 00 


3300/36 


1 00 each 


o 


4 7' 160 


10/100 


IB/BO 


20/1.00' 




10/160 


10/100 


22/50 


20/1.00* 


fl» 


22 160 


10/100 


*7/B0 


20/1. 00* 


• 


4 7/250 


10/100 


100/50 


10/1 00 


10/250 


8/100 


160/50 


8/100 


<^ 


!2'250 


s/1 00 


220/50 


8/100 


< 


1 /350 


a/100 


10/76 


12/100 


3 3/350 


6/1.00 


47/100 


S/1.00* 


() 


BI-POLAR 


1500/100 


. 2/1.00' 


Ul 


100/10 


10/1 00 


2 2/150 


12/100 


a. 


4/60 


10/100 


3.3/150 


12.'1.00 


M 


10/60 


10/100 


47/200 


S/1 00 


n 


4 7/75 


4/100 


1/2S0 


1B/10O 


o 


10/76 


4/100 


2.2/250 


12/100 








1/2S0 


1 S/1 00 


Carbide Drill Bits M .00 H, 


15O/3S0 


Z/1.00' 


• 


(various sizes to *h") 


1/600 


1 2/1 OO 







' Yes AH Prices Are Correct! • 
Ail Above Capacitors * Some 



*1 0.00 Minimum Order on 
Quaniitv Pricing Available • 



MORE S1 .OO SPECIALS 



1N4001 
2N3905 
2SC328 
2SC644 



16/>1.00 
6/'1.00 
B/'I.OO 
6/'1.00 



SPS7390/ECG123P 

S/'I.OO 
MINIDPDT SiKie 4/'1 
D P.O T Rocker Sw 
4A 120VAC 3/'1.00 

1N415: 25/'1,00 

Similar to 1N914 

4 Pos DIP sviTitcti 3/"1.00 

1N5239 20/'1,00 

9 V 2EMER 



2N6055 -1.00 

Pwr Darlington T03 
7 Seg LEO Readout 
HP S082-7660 
6/'1.00 
Hon P.C Tr impels. 2600. 
600fl. 5kn, 10O 4/M 

MC3420P '1.00 

SN76160 '1.00 

LEDs 8/M.OO 

Translormer *1 .00 

12VCT 260 MA 
7805 2 /'1. 00 

7S12 2/'1.00 




;^-"ACU-1 75-3000 

UHF - VHf Spllttir/ Joiner 
*- $2.95 



85C 



A.B. Coaxial Switch 
$2.49 -^ 




CMt 300-150] 
SI. 25-* 

3- Position Coaxial 

Push-Butlon Switch 

S4.95 



FLASHER KIT 95C 

(1)LIUI3909 (1)LED [IjlOO^FCap 
1 2 Application Schematics 



1 2V 6 A.H. Re-chargeable 
GEL CELL BATTERY ^^ 

$9.95 




25 W.Weller Type Iron 
SPECIAL $8.95 



35 W. Solder Iron . . . $4.95 



ITEMS MC.UISA, COD VIA UPS ■■■ 
VSA 
(Plus Shipping /KandlingA ^^^^1 

CIRCLE 92 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




MORE CAIN 

THAN A VARACTOR UHF TUNER 



SATISFACTION 

GUARAKTEED 

$\5.Q0 

Fl«q.nv^U)F47il 

»B9MHi covings 1403 

Dutpul Channal 3. 

Part No. B20 *™"* " '""*"■ ** ^ " * 
Modified High Gain Tuner SI 5.80 

1 . Th« first thing we do is change the standard 
diode found in every tuner to a Hot Carrier 
Diode. 

2. The tuners output is tfwn measured artd 
compared to our computer derived chart 
from which we determine the correct 
value coil to add across the IF output for 
maximum Pre- Peaked gain. 

3. The tuner is fed a standard 1 0db antenna 
input and while monitoring tfie output on 
our Spectrum Anaiyier, the tuner is tuned 
to the desired channel and its oscillator is 
offset for the desired output frequency as 
foilows: 

Ch. 2:58Mhz Ch. 3: 63Mhz Cti. 4: eSMhz 

Wa caJI this stofi p«akrng because tNe tuners oulpul loo4(s like 
I peak on an sfwctrum ii\>ttiv and Ihe riighest pant til mat 
p4^ is aclualty adjusted for the dasjrsd output. 

4. Finally, we measure the tuners output one 
more time which is again compared to our 
computer derived perfomiance chart to 
ascertain the correct value of the second 
coil which is added to the tuners internal 
connections. 

TMs procedure was devehiperj tff GILCO and its our corrsHJter 
dsiiveit perfomance charts Hal make our tuner !»ttef That's 
because atrttcet avery tuner ^ts a dtherent value coti belort 
it's peahHl and then a ditfefent value coil after it's peaked. TtiA 
comtNnatiDOS arc ehdtess and the way we dflterrniM the vajues 
is our secret. 



PHIHTEO CIRCUIT BOARDS 



Part No. B21 Printed Circuit uoara SI 7.00 

1. This Printed Circuit Board uses only one 
jumper, others use 9. 

2. The component layout is screen printed on 
ttie Component side of the pre-drilled P/C 
Board. 

3. The solder side of the P/C Board is covered 
with High Temperature Solder flesist for 
ease of assemtily. 

4. This P/C board was designed to take advan- 
tage of the Gilco High Gain Tuner which 
means its circuitry is simpler and more 
efficient than those circuits that require 
inferior Varactor Tuners. 



ELECTRON C PARTS KITS 



Part No. B22 Complete Parts Kit SU.OO 

Arl resistors (30), PoiBmi«T»tws (1-5K. 3.vO«), Panel Mount 
Potantionwter (10K), Electrolyhg Capacitors (6). Ceranic and 
Mylar Disc Capacitors (3S). VaiiaUe Capacitors (4). Alt Inter 
grated Crcuils (7), Voliag« Regulator, tleai Sink, Diodes (4), IC 
Sockets (4-i pin. 314 pin). Power Transfomer (24W1A), Coil 
KI1 mrith Mo. ZE wire (4), Speaker (4 "-3 0; |, Standolts. Coaxial 
calile. Ail misc. Hardware, etc. All parts are individualty 
packaged ano labeled. 

All compoTMnts including the wire. Hardware, Coaxial Cal)to and 
heat sinte are included in me pails kit. This means your as 
semESiv time from start le finisll is only 4 nogr^. 

Order all 3. B20, B2f , B22 1 10.00 

Order 5 each, B20, B21 , 622 95.0O/set 



ACCESSORIES; AMPLIFIERS 



Part No. 

A02 



New2StageLow KItSlt.DO 

Noise 2Bdb gain RF 
Amplifier Specially 
designed tor kit builders 



PLEASE WRITE OR CALL 

FOR FREE INFO BEFORE 

ORDERING ANY OTHER KIT 

M«ll DTdar onif. Sertij crisck or tnoney ordeno 
GILCO INTERNATIONAL. INC. 

P.fl. Bai »17. Cv^fiiWei, FL 33124 
TbI.(305)9235891 FofCODorders add 10"/. shipping 

and fiandhhg or tor orders gver $S(]. add S%. 
FL iMMemi IN S% i^ei tu. Ptiiu wM Mr I 



FINEST QUALITY 

Government Approved QQ-S-571e 



^aosi 






SPECIAL 
FOR THE MONTH 

Good until June 30, 19B3 





SN 60/40 Rosin Core{RA) 

One \h. Reels 

16 swg. (.064) $8.50 

18 svjg. (.048) $8.95 

19 swg. (.040) $9.50 

21 swg. (.032) $10.50 
V2 lb. Reels 

22 swg. (.028) $6.95 
24 swg. (.022) $8.95 

PlUC FRFF Dwolilering Wick 

■ IMw I I Ikk witn each Douna of soiaei 

FREE Freight On All OrdefsOver$25 

Unaer S25 acid S2.50 per order. Minimum order $10 
■ Ctak ■ Money Older ■ Master Ctiarge ■ Visa 

/^ ay. stale residenis ddd appinpriate s^les tax. 
To place your order call: 
TOIiFREE800-645-4808 
In NYS (516) 334-2660 No cocs iccetnea 




CIRCLE 51 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



m 



THE WORLD FAMOUS 



CATALOG OF 
ELECTRONICS 



■ l^lOEO 

• IELEPMOME 

■ CMtE TV 

>e«Brs "v , 

> AUDIO ^ 

■ ElKTBOWcl 



1000 s Of FASeiNATINt^ 
FACTOBY ClEHflOUTS. , 
SUBPIUS SPECIALS AND 
BARGAIN OFI^ERS NOT FOUNi 

III StORES OR CATALOGS 

AfiV WHERE' 




ETCO ELECTRONICS 

DEPT. 591 

Mailing List Control Center 

Box 840 

Champlain, N.Y. 1Z919 

I Enclose (cash OK); 



Is 



Please rush postpaid 

□ SI tof i ysar substsrlptlon to Ihs 
world famous ETCO catalog. 
S3 Canadian & Foreign 1 yoar 
subscription to Ihs ETCO catalog. 
I — I 304 pago tiandtioole "BUILD YOUR 

TELEPiiONES. (TA001) S11.00 

I I FREE - sample copy of tho tiargaln 
'— ' packod ETCO catalog. (USAonly) 

Name 

Add res s 

City 



I'—' OWN EARTH STATION". fTA025) $10.00 
PI 360 pagsE MASTER HANDBOOK OF 




State. 



..Zip. 



FUJITECH AUDIO KITS 



LATEST AUDIO TECHNOLOGY 
FROM JAPAN 



Model ASOt Power Amp 
' Pure Class A 25W +■ 25W 

■ Switchable to Class AB lOOW + 100W 

■ Switchable to Bridge Class A 100W mono 

' Switchable to Bridge Class AB 3CX)W mono 

* Frequency Response 5-2O0KHZ (tdSl 
' Signal-to- Noise Ratio 120dB 

* Non-magnetic Chassis 

" "Out-board" comprehensiveprotection 
circuitry 

* DC circuitry with limited use of fJFB 

' High Efficiency Fluid Convection Cooling 

■ Tfib under 0.007% 




$299.00 



Model AS02 DC Sterao Control Center 

■ Direct DC coupling from Input to Output 
' DC servo circuitry 

■ Cascade FET Input in all stages 

' Separate Moving Coil RIAA amplifier 

■ Distortion below 0,005% (3V) 
" Max Output 15V 

" Frequency Response 2OHz-20KHz ±0.2 dB 

• Maximum Phono Input 

MC = 16mv RMS (IKHz) 
MM = 270mv RMS (IKHz) 

■ Built-in Headphone amplifier 

• Relay Output Muting Kla «• 




$349.00 



Model A1033 Integrvted Tub« Amplifier 

' Latest Japanese Design 
' Distortionless Output Transformer using 
special winding techniques 

■ Most circuitry on PCB for easy aKamtily 
and hum tree performanoe 

■ Output 30W y. 2 Ultra Linear 

(Switchable to Triode) 
15W >: 2 Triode Output 
(nsai* class A performance) 
• THD under 0.4% 

' Frequency Response 30—30,000 Hi {-IdB) 
' Separate Pre-Out and Main-ln 



KIT ONLY 
S4M.0O 



<•(*(• r£ 






u.^'H'ha a '-s 



$499.00 

Send $5,00 for each assembly manual. 

refundable with order. 

Monarchy En{|ineeiing, Inc. 
380 Swift Avenue, Unit 21 
South San Francisco. CA 94080 

Visa or Mastercharge acceptable. 



CIRCLE 38 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



> 
-< 

to 

CD 

121 



HIGH QUALITY 55 dB GAIN 



MICROWAVE 
TV SYSTEM 

Variable from 1.9 to 2.5 GHz 



The latest advance 
in microwave 

technology »/ith a 

SNOW-FREE 

PICTURE. 




Introductory 
SPECIAL 



124 



95 



THIS UNIT COMES COMPLETE WITH: 

• 20" Fiberglass Parabolic Dish 

• Pre-Assembled Probe with 
Down Converter 

• Power Supply and Coax Switch 

• 60' of RG-59/U Coax with Connector 

• Transformer for 75 to 300 Ohms 

• All Mounting Hardware for Fast 
and Easy Installation 

Swid CasHets C heck or ^Vy1ev Order lt>. 
JP«n4nal C^t(K)t£. allcw^S hveeka ta cieaA 



JUME 



4670 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 90027 
ForC.O.D. Orders Call (213) ssa^H^ 



CIRCLE 32 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



GiiecH Tnese PriGHS On Factorv Prime parts 

* AUTHORIZED MAIL ORDER DISTRIBUTORS 

* moTQRDLa mHo distributor 



* Don T SEE ITT? 6tUE US A CALU! 
"All Parts Fuilu BuBrantBBfl 



O 



O 



O 



o 

Q 
< 

a: 
122 



POPULAR MICRdWAVE DEVICES - ' . fl 


MflF 901 


S?15 


NEC 07135 hrgn gam ' 


2N6603 iiSDl.ites 




low noise S3 50 


WRF W31 


sg?s 


Chip Caps 001 


MRF911 


S215 


lOSx 111 4/S100 


MBD 101 


S 1.') 


Theirnisior 

IK Ohm in- 3b C S ?■! 


LINEAR ICS - 






MC 1330 


St 65 


MC 17MCP S » 


MC 1330A1P 


St 7b 


MCJSSeCPl S B5 


MC 1349P 


SI 40 


Nf 554 S7 50 


MC 135CP 


SI 20 


NE 665 S1 30 


MC 135aP 


SI 70 


i.M30WN S 34 


MC 13MP 


$210 


IM307N S 45 


MC 14MCP1 


S 70 


LM380N S 89 


MC t496P 


SIOO 


LM18S9 S2 4i 


DYNAMIC RAMS - 




4116 I6K700NS 




Site 51195 


LOW PROFILE SOLDER TYPE IC SOCKETS — I 


Spin ID 40 [jin 




IC per om 120 pin - 20ti ■ 


RESISTORS -1 


'4 Wall S 


h CArhrtn Flli« — ^^^^™ 


Slaridaid Vabe 


10 Ohm 10 3 3 Meo Ohm ■ 


Same Value i ■ lOO 


02 tit m 


Same Value 100 


1000 


015 en ■ 


Same Vainf lOOO !ip 


010 i;n M 


MISCELLANEOUS — 




MVJI09 


S 82 


pQlanzen Line Cord H 


Mv^^09 


S 40 


5 Foot S 42 ■ 


IN4001 40D4 




75-30Q0hm Matcmng ■ 


4007 10 tor S 99 


Transloimer S 50 1 


Gardiriec Soldei 


G0''40FIO5in Care ■ 




Spools 58 10 ■ 



KGS Electronics Corp. 

P.O. BDK 33Z0S 

PtlOBnlll.ArlIorTB850B7 

^^ (602)274-2885 

Special Quantllv Pricine, Mm. Credit 
Card Order 1)5.00. Na MIn. on CUD or Prepaid. 
Prepaid Orders Add SZ50 Stitp.. Ins.. Handling 



CIRCLE 151 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



This Equipment 
Saves Lives. 
You Can, Too. 




Arthur Ashe 

National Campaign Chairman 

American Heart Association 

Sophisticated equipment alone 
doesn't save enough lives from 
heart disease and stroke. Peo- 
ple like you do. Because you 
support our efforts to under- 
stand why nearly 40 million 
Americans have some form of 
heart disease, stroke or related 
disorder. And why half of all 
deaths are caused by this 
Number One Killer. 

The American Heart 
Association is fighting to reduce 
early death and disability from 
heart disease and stroke with 
research, professional and pub- 
lic education, and community 
service programs. 

But more needs to be done. 

You can help by giving your 
time and sending your dollars 
to your American Heart 
Association, listed in your 
telephone directory. 



* 



American Heart 
Association 



WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 



OPPORTUNITY 

WITHOUT 

RISK. 



The biggest 

improvement in 

Savings Bonds In 

40 years. 



New Variable 
Interest Rate. 

Looking for an ideal invest- 
ment? One with a variable 
interest rate? But one 
where rates can't drop 
below a certain level? 

, Well, there is one avail- 
able to everyone, even if 
you have only $25 to invest. 

It's U.S. Savings 
Bonds. Now changed from 
a fixed to a variable interest 
rate, with no limit on how 
much you can earn. 

A Guaranteed 
Minimum. 

Although interest 
rates will fluctuate, you're 
protected by a guaranteed 
minimum. And if you hold 
your Bond to maturity, 
you'll double your money. 
You may do even better. 

Take another look at 
Savings Bonds. We did, and 
made them better. 




, stock\«i^ 



.V I A public service o\ this pu till cation 
and The Advertising Council. 





Computer 
Products, 



VISIT OUR RETAIL STORE 
AND RECEIVE A 5% DISCOUNT' 



50 KELLER STREET, #9 



8000 



5 6.95 


8239 


4.75 


9 7,59 


8243 


4.75 


OA 3.90 


8250 


14.90 


5A 7.95 


8251 


4.50 


B 34.95 


8253 


8.75 


5 7,75 


8253-S 


9.75 


6 8.75 


8255 


4.50 


5 29,00 


8255-5 


5,20 


1 39.00 


8257 


8.50 


a 14,95 


8259 


6.85 


5 29,95 


8272 


39.00 


2 27.95 


8275 


29,00 


5 3.45 


8279 


9.25 


2 1.80 


8279-5 


9.95 


4 3.75 


8282 


6.50 


6 1.75 


8283 


6.50 


4 2,45 


82B4 


5.50 


5 1.80 


S286 


6.50 


8 4.50 


8287 


6.50 


7 19.00 


828S 


25.00 


8 4.75 


8289 


49.00 



SANTA CLARA, CA 95050 



16K APPLE 
RAM CARD 

Upgrade your 48K Apple 11 
to Ml G4K 

BARE BOARD 14.00 

KtT 39.90 

ASSEMBLED & TESTED 45.00 



LEDS 



Junnbo Red 
Junnbo Green 
Jumbo Yellow 



10/1.00 

6/1,00 
6/1.00 



CONNECTORS 



RS 232 
RS232 
RS232 



Male 

Female 

Hood 



3,00 
3.50 
1.20 



74LSO0 SERIES 



LSOO 


,24 


74LS123 


.95 


74LS253 


.eo 


LSOl 


.24 


74 LSI 24 


2.90 


74LS257 


.80 


LS02 


,24 


74 LSI 25 


,95 


741 S?58 


,80 


L.S03 


.24 


74 LSI 26 


.79 


74LS259 


2. SO 


LS04 


.24 


74LS132 


.75 


74LS260 


.60 


LS05 


.24 


74LS136 


.49 


74LS266 


.49 


LS08 


.24 


74LS137 


,95 


741 SP73 


1.60 


LSIO 


.24 


74LS138 


.75 


74LS275 


3,25 


LSll 


.30 


74LSi39 


.75 


74LS279 


.45 


LSI 2 


.30 


74LS145 


1.10 


74LS2ao 


1.95 


LS13 


.40 


74LS147 


2.20 


74LS283 


.95 


LS14 


.89 


741.5148 


1.20 


74LS290 


1,20 


LS15 


.30 


74LSJ51 


.75 


74LS293 


1.79 


U520 


.24 


74LS1S3 


.75 


74LS295 


.99 


LS21 


.30 


74LS154 


1.75 


74LS298 


.99 


LS22 


,24 


74LS15S 


,89 


741 S3 24 


1,75 


LS26 


.30 


74LS156 


.89 


74LS352 


1.49 


LS27 


.24 


74LS157 


,75 


74LS353 


1,49 


LS2a 


,30 


74LS158 


.75 


74LS363 


1.49 


LS30 


.24 


74LS160 


.95 


74LS364 


1,95 


1-S32 


.36 


74LS161 


.95 


74I..S365 


,89 


LS33 


.55 


74LS162 


.95 


74LS366 


.89 


LS37 


,55 


74LS163 


.95 


74LS367 


.69 


L.S38 


.35 


74LS164 


.95 


74LS368 


.59 


LS40 


.30 


74LS165 


.95 


74LS373 


.99 


LS42 


.49 


74LS166 


1.95 


74LS374 


1.69 


.LS47 


.75 


74LS168 


1,69 


74LS377 


1,40 


LS4S 


.75 


74LSi69 


1.69 


74LS378 


1.15 


.LS49 


.75 


74LS170 


1.69 


74LS379 


1.35 


• LS51 


.30 


74LS173 


.75 


74LS385 


1.89 


• LS54 


.35 


74 LSI 74 


.89 


74LS386 


.59 


■ LS55 


.35 


74LS175 


.89 


74LS390 


1.79 


.LS63 


1.20 


74LS181 


1.99 


74LS393 


1.79 


■ US73 


,39 


74LS189 


9,50 


74LS395 


1.59 


tL574 


.44 


74LS190 


.39 


74LS399 


1.59 


H_S75 


.49 


74 LSI 91 


,89 


74LS424 


2,89 


H_S76 


.39 


74LS192 


.89 


74LS447 


.75 


H_S78 


.49 


74LS193 


.89 


74LS490 


1,89 


tl-583 


,75 


74LS194 


,89 


74LS66e 


1,65 


tusas 


.95 


74 LSI 95 


.89 


74LS669 


1.85 


H_S86 


.39 


74LS196 


.79 


74LS670 


2.10 


H.S90 


,65 


74LS197 


,79 


74LS674 


9.50 


tLS91 


.79 


74LS221 


1.10 


74LS6a2 


2.99 


H_S92 


.65 


74LS240 


.95 


74LS683 


2.39 


ILS93 


,59 


74LS241 


.95 


74LS6B4 


2.39 


ILS95 


.79 


74LS242 


1.79 


74LS685 


2.39 


ILS96 


.79 


74LS243 


1.79 


74LS688 


2.39 


tLS107 


.39 


74US244 


.95 


74LS6B9 


2.39 


H-S109 


.39 


74LS245 


1.89 






H_S112 


.39 


74LS247 


.79 


81LS95 


1.65 


H_S113 


.39 


74LS248 


1.20 


81LS96 


1.65 


ILS114 


.49 


74LS249 


.89 


81LS97 


1.65 


11-S122 


.45 


74LS2S1 


1.25 


B1LS9S 


1.65 







EPROMS 




STATIC RAMS 






1702 


(Ins 


3.00 


2101 


(4S0ns) 
(250ns LP) 


1.85 




2708 


(45 ns 


2.99 


21L02 


1.55 




2716 


51/ 450ns 


3.49 


2111 


(450ns 


2.49 




2716-1 


5v 350ns 


7.85 


2114 


(450ns 


1,75 




2532 


5v 450ns 


7.85 


2114L-3 


(300 ns LP) 


1.85 




2732 


Sv 450ns 


6.49 


2114L-2 


i200ns LP) 


1,95 




2764 


5v 450ns 


Call 


TMM2015 
TMIVI2016 


i200nsl 
1150ns} 


5.49 
6,49 




DYNAMIC RAMS 




TMM2016 
HM6116 


1 100ns) 
1200ns 


7.49 
Call 










HM6116 


150ns 


Call 




4027 


250ns) 


2,00 


HM6116 


120ns 


Call 




4116 


200ns} 


1.25 










4116 


150ns) 


1,75 


LP = 


= LOW Power 






4164 


200ns) 


Call 










Z80 

280 A CPU 


4.95 




WE WILL BEAT 




ZSO A PIO 
280 A CTC 


4.95 
6.95 


ANY COMPETITOR'S 




Call for CompI 


ets List 






PRir 


FSI 







MICROPROCESSOR 

REAL-TIME CLOCK 

MSM 5832 

6.90 



Call before you buy 



6500 



6502 


5,49 


6502A 


9,45 


6504 


6.90 


6505 


7,65 


6507 


9.90 


6520 


4.35 


6522 


7.95 


6532 


9.95 


6551 


11.75 



UPGRADE 
YOUR 
APPLE 

or 
TRS-80 

4116 200ns 

8/10.00 





CRYSTALS 




32.768 KHZ 


1.90 


5. 185 


3,90 


1,0 MHZ 


4.50 


5.7143 


3,90 


1.8432 


4.50 


6.5536 


3.90 


2.0 


3.90 


8.0 


3.00 


2.097152 


3.90 


10.0 


3,00 


2.4576 


3.90 


14,31818 


3.90 


3.2768 


3.90 


18.0 


3.00 


3.579545 


3.00 


18,432 


3.00 


4.0 


3.00 


20.0 


3.00 


5.0 


3,00 


22.1184 


3.00 


5,0688 


3.90 


32.0 


3.90 



Disc Controller 



1771 
1791 
1793 
179S 
1797 



16.00 
27.95 
29.95 
49.95 
49.95 



Interface 



8X26 

8T2a 

8X95 

8T96 

BT97 

8T98 

DM8131 

DS8836 



1.65 

1.95 

.95 

,95 

.95 

.95 

2.90 

1.25 



ORDER TOLL FREE 

(800) 538-8800 
(800) 848-8008 

(CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS) 

ALL MERCHANDISE IS 100% GUARANTEED 



IC Sockets ST W/W 

8 PIN .10 .49 

14 PIN .12 ,50 

16 PIN .15 .57 

18 PIN .20 .85 

20 PIN .25 .99 

22 PIN ,25 1.30 

24 PIN .25 1.40 

28 PIN ,35 1.50 

40 PIN .40 1,80 

ST = Sotdertail 
W/W = Wirewrap 



CMOS 



4000 
4001 
4002 
4006 
4007 
4008 
4009 
4010 
4011 
4012 
4013 
4014 
4015 
4016 



.25 
.30 
.30 
.90 
,25 
.90 
.45 
.45 
.30 
.30 
,45 
.90 
.90 
.45 



LINEAR 



LM301 

LM308 

LM309K 

LM311 

LM317T 

LM317K 

LM318 

LM323K 

LM324 

LM337K 

LM339 

LM377 

LM380 

LM3e6 

LM555 

LM556 

LM565 

LM566 

LM567 

LM723 

LM733 



.32 

.75 
1.25 

.64 
1.65 
1.70 
1.49 
3.75 

.59 
3.90 

,79 
2.25 



,25 
1.00 
.38 
.65 
.95 
1.45 
.99 
.49 
.95 



LM741 

LM747 

LM74S 

LM1310 

MC1330 

MC1350 

MC1358 

LM1414 

LM1458 

LM1488 

LM1489 

LMiaoo 

LM1889 

LM3900 

LM3909 

LM3914 

LM3915 

LM3916 

75451 

75452 

75453 



.29 

.75 

.49 

2.45 

1.69 

1.25 

1,69 

1.49 

.55 

.95 

.95 

2.45 

2.45 

.59 

,95 

3.70 

3.70 

3.70 

.35 

.35 

.35 



4017 
4018 
4019 
4020 
4021 
4022 
4023 
4024 
4025 
4026 
4027 
4028 
4029 
4030 
4034 
4035 
4040 
4041 
4042 
4043 
4044 
4046 
4047 
4049 
4050 
4015 
4053 
4060 
4066 
4068 
4069 
4070 
4071 
4072 
4073 
4075 
4076 
4078 
4081 



1.15 
.90 
.45 
.90 
.90 

1,10 
.35 
.75 
.35 

1.60 
.60 
,75 
.90 
.45 

2.90 
.85 
.90 

1,20 
.75 
.75 
.75 
,90 
.90 
.50 
.50 
.90 
.90 

1.39 
.75 
.39 
.30 
.35 
.30 
.30 
.30 
,30 
.90 
.30 
.30 



4082 
4085 
4086 
4093 
4098 
4099 
4502 
4503 
4508 
4510 
4511 
4512 
4514 
4515 
4516 
4518 
4519 
4520 
4522 
4526 
4527 
4528 
4531 
4532 
4538 
4539 
4543 
4555 
4556 
4581 
4582 
4584 
4585 

80C07 
80C95 
80C96 
80C97 
80C98 



.30 

.90 

,90 

.90 

2.49 

1.90 

.90 

.60 

1.90 

.90 

.90 

.90 

1.20 

2.20 

1.50 

1.20 

1.20 

1.20 

1.20 

1.20 

1.90 

1.20 

.90 

1.90 

1.90 

1.90 

2.70 

.90 

.90 

1.90 

1.90 

.90 

.90 

.90 
.90 
.90 
.90 
1.15 



oKau 



W IVUU Computer Products, I nc. 
3250 Keller Street, #9 
Santa Clara, CA 95050 
(800) 538-8800 
Local Calif, Residents (408} 988-0697 



STORE HOURS: 

MON-FRI 3:30 A.M. '6:00 P.M. 

SAT 10:00 A.M. -3:00 P.M. 



BankAmericai^D 



, master charge , 



TERMS: For shipping include $2.00 for UPS 
Ground. $3.00 for UPS Blue Label Air. SIO.OO 
minimum order. Bay Area residents add ^Vi% Safes 
TaK. California residents add 6% Sales Tax. We 
reserve the right to limit quantities and substitute 
manufacturer. Prices subject to change without 
notice. Send SASE tor complete list. 



CIRCLE 99 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




MICROPROCESSOR COMPONENTS 1^ Digitaiker 



Stli'4'91N 

5N74CIM 

5N740rN 

SH7UH 
»;<■« 

»mtn 
smiitvt 

vturm 

3JfMt/l|: 

srrr^MN 
SNr^nN 

tnHUH 

atUKH 

EllMi?11 
»»UM 

atruoH 

SNMEriW 
SMHHN 
SNr^UA 

5H74.yt*i 

74LSDI1' 
T-ILHir 

7'ILM13 
J4L$04 

74L5fl 

74LS1f 
fJLSl! 
74LS1^ 

mSM 

T*Lill 
T4.1S33 

741K« 
rALSZT 

?*LS« 
ftlil! 
f4LS!) 
?4im 

nu4fl 

I*LSil 

nii*7 
r4j.5ti 

MLS74 
74L£7B 

ms» 

74LSK 

TJLSW 



5|ir747>U| 

Sir74aiw 

VI74U'I 

£l(74Ui| 

suruH 1 

Sll74«*( 1 

SNr49QII 1 

5fr491N 1 

snnsm 1 

»7i»M 1 

NfT4»4tp 1 

SHn9^ 1 

SH7il9Bit 1 

auwtn 1 

HNtOtt ■ 

5K74IK* T 

SMN1D7N 1 

Sil74l«N 1 

WMlfM I 

5*1 7^1! H 1 

»t7-tir» 1 

514741Z11I 1 

SH^41Z»I 1 

5»rr*ii6K 1 

yt7^i3JJi 1 

»I741H>I 1 

5N7iUiH 1 

tNT*-\Alll 1 

SNr+H3« J 

SN7414SH 1 

^741JJN 1 

514^4 MiN 1 

S^r4lMN Z 

S)4r41StN 1 

5NN151H 1 

SN741UN 1 

SN74 1^411 I 

SNf4lSWl 1 



NtSK 
74LSH 
7'ILS1I>7 
7JL51W 
74LSII? 
r<LSl13 
7-!LS114 
7<LS1?! 
7JLS1!1 
7<LS1» 
74LS12S 
7*L5137 
74LS133 

74L5111 
r4L£i» 
7ILS15) 

7<usm 

7«LS1M 
7<L51S} 
74LS1U 
74LSl5r 
7tLStU 

74L51EI 
7^LS1K 
7IU1E1 
74L51W 

;r4tsi.E$ 
MLSrEa 

TILSrM 
Z4LS1?0 
74LSt73 
;4LSF74 
74LSTrSi 
J4LSigi 
T4LSi» 
7«LS1II 



IHWHH 11 

ENr41E7H II 

»F4iBin i< 

W74I6I(( 1« 

iKT^^Ka^ it 

Str^lBM II 

W741tll( U 

Sl(741flJ* II 

SMMi^m 11 

S1I741JM It 

SII74177N » 

SurilTIN 11 

SUM 1^4 II 

9iJ*i7itt U 

SH74t7CH m 

ShZlim 14 

^NETW II 

S)f74FBM Tl 

SM/ilim 14 

SHJilKH II 

»741l4lt 11 

yf7i^a•J^ t| 

^T^^sm■ 11 

»741S[I| 14 

SII7*r!3h II 

^r41l3N 11 

S^r^l-HN II 

Sh74i«6N II 

SN741HN 14 

SNT411JN U 

SN7411MN n 

SNr41VSN ;4; 

ShMJJiN II 

SN74»IN II 

SNT4;7M tt 

5NJ4?7flN 1( 

SNf4Zt3N II 

iHJuma II : 

SHUTSiH It : 

SN743UN It 

SHJ43E«N 11 

SIII74M7N II 

SN74)UN It 

SNT4»}t< It 

5l4T4n)N 14 



7<LSiflJ 
MLSIU: 
T4L5IU 
T4LS1» 

74L5?!( 
74LSIta 

74L5H; 
7*LaJ3 

74LH45 

74LS?rt 

74L5JM 
7*LSM7 
I'ALSZSI 
741 S?» 

74m?9 

7415J« 

f4LSi?li 
741SU1 
741S3M 
741SU 
?4i:UU 
74iS3(7 
7IISMJ 
74).S37J 

741SI71 
74i»H 
74LSM3 
74133M 

r+LSeni 



r4Joo 

74Sei 
T+SM 

74S04 
T4S0S 
74501 
?45M 
74S10 
74S11 
r4S]5 
74SW 

i*^n 

74^30 

usia 
I4as 

74340 
74S&1 
JlSti 
74StS 
74S74 
;4SS« 
MS 11} 
MS 11] 





MICROPROCESSDR CHIPS — 






f^1n 


fHKEM 


fnw 


CDoiMJ 


40 

ti 


CfJ 


M?i 


Jt» 


UPj 


14 &> 


'bWKOiAOt 


K 


tinf-4 &:»i(«i:am Tpnj Df 


^»B 




U 


Mm*VDKHtSM(bTlMn»™| 


»» 




W 


uniw^'ciKiiwinAu 


7H 




«tt 


Uru-!WI5UHJ| 


b»> 




U 


CPuSfli c*«g|.Mii2iHi fttifli 
CPlf«»fibt}HiUili 


&l» 


mSRHQUI 


40 


SB& 




u 


ItIS 


'SBMIW 


Iff 


CPVM/auc Uicr^rmtrprHM 


14 84 


w*w 


«t 


Cft( 


itn 


zn 


. ZBOA. ZIDB. ZBOOD SERIES 




nc 


» 


c^^lltll»»Ni(7^K1JUHr 


f4» 


MClt 


n 


C«infFTwCl[i»4 


i.«i 


m-{»nT 


4t 


DuU AivnOHWiocA nK./Trm 


ItflS 


afrwuA 


iff 


1 « 


mr\ti 


« 


f^Ari/Oini.ri«aCGninav 


« 


ZHSlUiD 


U 


SW 1 'it i;Th£« vtj lUCl BQnOn 


1 » 


Z«S1{I/I 


u 


54nUI.'0i:ue\iDTHI» 


1 » 


JIO-510'? 


«B 


svnii^oiueiis^ai 


r » 










iiaiL 


II 


CFUrUEHHN 4I17H: E) 4UK 


» 




n 


CiiuMirTmfCm^ 




:»*cuirr 


Orjc: Vvner, Mail CfOA 


1 *4 


JBWOU* 


H 


l?» 


ZKl-^riD 


u 


r3*iV\m\«Urtia\Jv<'J!ilti 


9« 


;KiiSio;ci 


u 


S«i»li^(HTiCt«IIWB««l*. 


1 » 


ZBCUlSiO/i 


td 


Siniil^fUljaiOTBBf 


1 ft 


jr»ASio/2 


u 


SwailiiOlLKMSYircfli 


1 3^ 


aOAS10'9 


u 


StnMUft 


1 H 


rUQ 


4tf 


CfVi,llKilSrt tlWHf 


Mb 




CH,rHtfTimwC«t' 


13 as 


^BTI» 


IV 


Faf4Wi;cifliirlia[:«<inAf 


rrsi 


2N> 


4 




if as 


mai 


» 


CPUHoifSKmmW. 


^Pt 










fflOM 


tfl 


CsuftEtf/Traj' t RuiBa i/Q Unil 


?JB 








va«D 


H 


."J — 


435 


UCfcMKP 


<B 


UPUwrlhtlKkariilMU 


J!S 


LKMICukPi 


J4 


I^Mi^lilitlJUi 


3 S 


UU421 


iS 






vC£4;b 


4 


hwit!|:lnltmjp4Cwlra.i|K 
IDM^-bERQUtMCBUSDa^ 


I5!l 






la 1 


UCMW 






4 1 


ucua? 


4 


SffKhnWA ShuJ Gnu Maphr 


lb 










IK6W? 




oSKSffi'^rinl fUCtlJB 


r 34 


HE!*5ei. 


1 


li 



IB Uum PnriOcfil C«iAin CttAlmr 
II tntumtdheg C«nm inr 

BOBQA SERIES 



Z4» 
l» 



ilbSKtOA 

rwsiibOi 

IMS3I54 

DPKl! 
Dl'Ki4 
DPIIIfl 
DPfl«4 

E)PU?I 

iitssi4j 

iii5t?4S 
|it»74& 
(454147 

iii5n4i 

□PIA7 

tfCTb 

DPB05 
DPtB4 

Dmor 



MICHDPRDGES5QR MANUALS A DATA BOOKS 



•a CM 

«ft SfnUirvwbiOililnbritiEiiSillC^ 

U ihSiHRiUllt-Hlfq' 

n (ktiJ0FlpiF)QprTrf-^UUi74U74| 

14 t'Vlitim1vDuwr'^S4];t 

14 PngnlirlnlvriiplCVirTCl 

1 1 Bi-Q'iUuntf ■!» Dri^H 

TI IbflDrmr 

II S^1dRlCai1[/blDnnir7454I|| 

II SvitMC««i«l«ri;74&4]t) 

14 l/Qt>pv)dtrt«r4tSlin« 

^1 lE-ICff Civbav'dEKediit74CK»p 

It »K«TKt>IiMfdEftWrr74Q?]r 

It auiJTCHitPDDirfrjmzi' 

It Ajjn lEftmr ElHir<l|lN»3»> 

II hi^ ca™ i/DiusAKr» 

14 1^ lAttmirpw 

'■ "— " — —Btttum 



7» 



t» 

*■ f^ Knbord/thiplwMKlKi IK 
» I-fttTin-Su^B^CPndMtlTnM 3» 

IB l-telB»DMicflwril li c» H ir 3 44 

» J~t>i1»-[>«ClK«lltlfilf^ ?41l 

» atii Liicnrt - - 



UCDPIK 
ItNIDO 



UHrWu^uJ!' 



rSit2i[MDililH>A1i4d&K I 
IHi MM. CUDS bdcLEZlM i 

1WM LMWB0»[1B1«|^) 

*:44fl4P4l 

__ _ _ __ Mir»pg» 

E«j;iKgDibElwki'ti]p3 1 
t»1 InWPi— ^ 



7S0 



-DYNAMIC RAMS-^ 



mt4 



1103 
4017 
411M-I 
411U1 



II lOMir iXCmi 

11 40H41 (ZSOnik 

If ll.»4k1|E5ttl! 

II li3iHxir!0aui 

II ll.Wil fZ»ii|| 

11 tS.Ubl [ISIIMI 

II tS<Ufl<l|»CiR]| 

It EMf^l \XDn\ 



¥1 



11 



UU»1»4 



2.41 

in t'i4 9j 

ise-i.'i}.« 
1 491^ ion 

7 41 I'SiJJ 
49 L.'1«i 
2Mu:i fMMnp ... Jt — IJ1M 
4Q9e(1 l7U>4lWK4ni 

4Q9ti1 i!t»PilZECi7 
tt.SUifl ilWHi I n 4 

tl.»*ilL!««i :» l-ljn 

1^*411 '|1^MJ i 49 I.'10» 

IttM JIWIR)! 1 « 

STATIC RAMS 



J«i 



IFDI 

JtlW 
IKIO 

IEE1 

im 

!rE4 

}tE4l 

itr4'; 

M41.? 

|U(3 

t\*t 

J14I 

1US4(h44 

TUS4(Hb 

1»1i9E 

uu&ur 
iivfliiep-j 

iHUlBHClM 

j*n 

74CIIJ0 
MtWi 
74C9M 
74^9^ 
74Si« 

r4Si(n 

74S20e 
74S!» 



J7U 

!7CIS!i 

!US?^lt 

:MRat4 

J71I 

mj 
l7Ma 

UU?744 
WM?re4 J 



74SrU 

;4Siir 

I4S?B 

Z4S3ir 
T1S4M 
T4S4n 
Z4MIJ 
74S4T4 
MS47S 
;4»Tt 
T4SS7S 

riSiiE 

."45517 
MSS73 

van 

12^1 1!> 

nsizi 

K51» 
HStf? 
BSTM 
I»IB 

DVIT^IKH 
nU751t1ih 
DMSTSlUH 
DHI75IEM: 
[WI7S19W 

cuars[9iH 



II 2Mil ieM>q 

n i%iiA i^MoTjiiin 

It ^K*■•^ ouoii 
II [[U4ii uxntui' 

11 :»i4 l4Un4pilll 

II a&4 44Hn])WCt& 

It I1171i4 i|4Hn| 

II Hr!*i4 |4»At!lP 

II 1{l?4i4 i^Oinsi 

tl 1C;4>|4 iTQanililP 

tl U«al <ilUn|< 

tl 4JW]I rrOcT}! 

II 1>U4i4 |70ii| 

il 4«ffiiE (45aiu!i 

\t 1tlZ4i{4 C4»nth 

n ?S?»4 [4M«PCM« 

II 40Hck (4U:<IM0« 

14 iotiti iiHniiiCHas 
34 ?a4id tzmiihcugs 

14 »4M rJOChiUP CMOS 

11 iti4 iH>i:|5aoi 

11 JHh« ^ZSOmlCEJOScKJH 

II iiSU 1 3^111 CMOS 

i7U3ilCM0Sl»(]l;i 
rZ5Di1]|DUDSr5'51|j 
|3^«1|^]40S 
iaCntj934lO 
lECrilB^II 
l3Sfil3E[>1 
iWniDC 1S<34t$l 
iMTwiflC I7*HM1 

EPflOMS 

14 T^&^t nusj 

14 iei!4:rl i:450Aip 

14 10Z4x| iS^m>SMa]24t 

14 ^M (4;dn}|:2nE 

14 4i3SH-(l (4»(u|HUCU3Z 

11 lilflZxl i;4»ni,|' 

34 JMSkI (4KnilF]«t4lW 

Z4 »4SxB C4Uni| 

14 :&lbl (3.»nit 

14 HioggAl (4'^-iii. 

14 1024^ C4»n»p 

II tia2:c| (4«nif 

n >1 32^(1 t300ul 

PRDMS- 



1 49 

i» t/i}» 
2 1^ IJ'tSS^ 
1 Z5'l/tSS4 

4 Ei 
B9S 

3 Si 

3 SI 
I BS 

4 Si 



]OM>:l 



lOWil 



■*i>v 



4 35 
3«F 

in 

3 3S 

1^19!. 

rgs 

4tlb 

Z 3) 

t&35 



37a 
7Mi4 
Sit 
H»<4 
ZMmI 

_ SlM 
» &l2d 

Z4 Akza 



WOUIS I031 11 
iWUaC.(fi3W'i 

rmuts 11309-11 

nOUTS |£U9'1| 

rmuat ^a*ii 

FMNtfTS |IWlfS29S«r| 



f4 HB4it mOUTJ.lTBPaSMi 



!<F2i4 

II &E2t4 

II 1D»i4 

It iJMi4 

It 32>J 

14 5tZAl 

II 3ZeI 

It 2»i4 

It Obi 

It iF3l4 



PHUd'C:. (BUI 

neiyTS i42Si3?i 
dvucrc tZTSiip 

PfKHiTS lITSIEl 

nuur^ ijrsisi 

HQUOC limd^ 

mouis |2r»Ei 



UC34?Cf 

uci404t:' 

WC 140111 

*Dcn(H 

DAEQSK 
MICOSM 
AY-£nlfti}A 

1 1 TIAH- 1 



1iH4il «(lliTS,iKSi!li| 

iW&ct nciuac (i2SiK) 

ZflOW fWUlS.lMSHSj 

f^ji4 twuffi: tijSEWii 

2<HtJ PPdU! S |IIZS131| 

OATAACOKSITIOK^ 



4 K 
4» 
tl% 
?H 
?SS 
4» 
4H 
if ti 
9K 
?H 
3« 
391, 
iWi 

9n 

9K 
9»!< 

S,« 
991» 
39 9^ 
19 36 



II I tXlOVACcnwIVCOKCnClLPI^ 
n B-blA/DCflmnv ILSBt 

II |bita/AC«H«i«i:a7ttfcUii> 
7t IbiA/OCoHfiiwct-Ch Uur 
10 »KR>udU|itl{TR1»a} 
tUubUlHFMw 



DT1050 — Applicalions: TmchLng aidftp 
jippLlflrLcai, clocl^K. auionicilve, tQL»communic«' 
Ibna, iHnguaQ* Lran«lBl>ons, etc. 

Thi DT 1(B0 K a tl^kAdAM □kQITALKER Mt anffidMl wilFi 137 ttMm* 
ivHt iiHlu) iA«rda. Z lonn. Atid & diffs'iint nJtnc* tfufAUofim Th* 
WOr^ (ntl 1«n« hpv* b90 4»|igned divcriiE* frJi^tniKn;, nvikuig II 
potaibia 1o eulpm i>ngE»«maier*Qrd3 tcnctlHtEt«diiniophri&*t 
Of vrt<v Hnlancti Thi« "^ct' oulpuE ot ihc DliOAe ii i highly trv 
Idlrplbl* m»lB vcio f sriiji* and chilOnn'i «Jic»f >«n bf ^ynthiiu- 
M- The tactbuLLTT II. choAwr m thai ii ii apaiicabi* eq mtny fir>fr 
daeli and it4j>-c1s 

Tha O'Tt0» conitili dE > Spwch PrQlviior ChJp, UMfr41^ i:4l>p(np 
IMl CwDJ^^SpWCll RCMMl MMU1I4S5R1 liti HHiZtG435A3 C14'Pinh 
itong with j Hitlar Word Hil <>id i rtcHnmwiMd ictMrnitle 

DT1050 Digitaiker'" $34.95 ea. 



DT1057 — gipinds Ihe DT105O KKBbuliiy 
from 137 lo ovsr 260 words. Incl 2 HOMi And sp«cs. 
DT1057 S24.95 ea. 




RADIO CONTROL CIRCUITS 



IdMI Eg m« Ih: 

' Tayt, hebb|f eii4ti, nboti. trilni 

1 eu'BJvir pliirint ■ IR ditt llfih 

• RtmoEt lljda prg|«C|Qr conlpgl 

* Ce^iumi-i itinQl* daia \titlit. 



< EiMUfByi^vnaL lemBltlv iwllehtd Itghtlnf^ sykltini ^^ 
A. corrtpieia fri^hanngi digital encodar and ftF trartDmi1L>ii. Iqw p[»«»r, 
at li*nuert£]f ti( 37Urti flr 49MHi, i TiHd 9lir»i*fflh "iri lOJ»OiiV malar 
at -3 rriBkfi. yv cporstiofi ati c.tt\p HF <Mcilla)o<j|jAn vnl I1«t. 4n chip 

44 regulator. U3> 10 AOMH2 CIFEXK I'fldtMICy OjHinllCin. 

LM1RT1N RCEncoderH'ranitnnHttf Chip ...S1.as 

A, cfMnpEniiD nj^ F*G<tJVBtidcc«!ar, uEnd di ffillitiF 27hiHj! 4BIMHE gr 
rjMHJi It pravddtn 4 >.n[]tpfl-r«(gi I channels rtJien gned nith LM1B71 
ii JfUlog, 2 fl[^ I eparaica li<»n FAuF e.W KbHs, Cr>a1^1 ccnlr.gltKf. 

LMiaT2ht flC RBcaitfaTJDBcodBrChip SS,49 

" ' " " ^ .53.95 

.$3.95 



SRX1504 
SRX150S 



49.435MHz CrY&tal(LMia72N) . 
49,890M Hi Cry s ta I ( LMl an N) . 



■IIIMilt^lH 



71«tV/*if It 

ntiKH. 11 

7107iV/W 4t 

n Escft. 41 

71E7CPt 4« 
7HLIU5 

JWMV/W 14 

KwejR It 

r?D«fy.'M* It 

7H7AIR] tl 

tixm n 

7?KHM t 

71EVW 14 

ni5t¥/M* II 

7ZIIUUI H 

77tKUl » 

TtlEOin II 

7JT7IJf U 

7zt7un n 

n24iin. ifi 

7?fMUL » 

:^ZJfiAEV,'Kn' 41 



CM0^^t<;rTivir4nfr 
SlO?ft]telii:ri>p KTL 
3 Tf Dtgil A/ imtV Oin«] 
iC.CuwIbKd Ooplif 
SipkaBfiA'DtLEPOrhtj 
iC. Cirfvl hvd, bip^ 
3tiEkgnA'DL.CD[ht hUl 
IhOmOA'DLEOD^nLD. 



CUDS LEO SI 
SfeipaifekCtip.irTL 
TCiftiCciWttv 
TwiiCwwilsrCNP'. XTL 



frw Cnolar Cntp. JCtL 

C toe* Gmp Iter 

*Funt CUKSBfwatSCiT 
4fuK Sbp*ukhCmi». xHl 
iag]EU«to CnmvCA 
I &|tt f tq Coiuiuf -C A 
IDk^r^^ C*ir.»rCC 
4 [k^r Ldl' Upi'DBBfi CBonnr c A 
-H>5«UIHJp^tomC*rfiHrC C 
14341^ barHJ^Csunlu-ORI 
iQ^EUvf Ceuntir 
h FuKliAi Cbir-w !>«. XTI. 



14 H 
19 » 
995 
34» 
1193 
?9» 
Etta 

?» 

14 H 



3» 

l<3H 
t4» 
Z9» 
74 9S 

r9 9Si 

FI3) 

IDH 
MB^ 

1'4 5*r 




E300D9 19iB3 INTERSIL Data Book |13U|}» $9.$5 I 



^Programmable Array Logic (PALS) 



"iHilflHS 

PAiUMt 

pyi I4H4 
PAtlOLS 
PAII2L6 
P.IU.I4L4 
PAL I ELI 



PrtLI 



Octll 1{]'inpi1A>IDan{iJltAr7]Yl>li^aiitMli| 
nts 1 3 ir^Jl Aifft Ofl S4*» Arj]! I i"gh iMftutl 
OmxI E4 !'^9ul AFCD OFL GUr Arr±|i I.HI>gh I>i/1|n4) 
OcLjI I'D' Ini^iil ANQ an-1nw] GUI Af Ftp (LQwOuIPjIJ 
ma iZ'ired^KtMff'inmlliitoiMnj'iLmOwiiiull 
Qirjil S4 mpul Utt OFL-lftitrl C}U l^ly \\tm (MpUEp 
OcUl ll-lnixriJ^NQ'M'iiTvvlCilii/ritrtLDwQuttnill 
OcLiI iD'InpriAapuJlkAND-anGJFiAirf, 
iMi I & lr<^| Ragiilif mt) M Ikta tdiif 

qmm t6 ii-aui i>i»?iy awpw fan *rfiT 



[30012 1 Saa NATION A L PAt. QaU Bpgfc t<76 p t. .SS.sgj 



iH Hem 


14 


J 


lit- 


f 1 


iflfl*! 


74.CJ.*1 


K 


IV, 


^M 74Ca7 


14 










ua*^ 




)« 








I4C« 


14 


!S» 








TB i<c« 


14 




7^C107 


11 


1^ 


7iC373 




744 


M xog 


14 




74C15 


11 


7 45 


74CJ7t 




2 49 
























Z4C! 


14 




MCI 5 


t 




74t9(H 




W 


r>!l 


MC3 


14 




74CH 


1 




7*C9M 




V* 




Z4C3 


11 




74ciei 


1 




^*t911 








MOJ 


It 


1 


MCiez 


1 




74C91Z 




ht\ 


wa 


;4C4 


11 


1 5 


J4i:ie] 


1 




74aii 








MC 


14 




MC1W 






7iCiU 




i¥k 




T4C 4 


14 




/4C1I3 


1 




7*C9 Z 




4 49 




TK 


II 


1 5 


Z4C1J4 






J4DS73 




4 9*i^ 


H 


T4C 


14 




MCU 






T*a i 






l« 




It 


1. 


MClfl 


T 




MH B 




•*v, 




MCI 


14 


1 


MC1S 


T 


189 


WC95 




19 


II 


MtJ 




1 15 


MCI J 


% 


■■n 


«ci; 


_!.„ 


3^ 



laOOCl 1M3N>I.CM0SBwlnaiiHii )695 | 



riOJicr t 


IS 


nDRy ■ 


13> 


noKW It 


l« 


nntc^ I 


» 


atiKCf I 


1 19 


rLOHCH 14 


IK 


lUUICII t 


» 


LUJKH 


l» 


lUW4f 


ie 


IWOW 


» 


lUSOIta 1 


« 


lUJOKK » 





LH3QK 


IH 


IU310C> 1 


1 n 


IMJIICh 1 


H 


lUJlIU 


!« 


tMjm 


1 19 


lUJiK 


191 


iU^IVb 1 


1» 


lUJitli 14 


in 


lunws 


13! 


l.MjMlH-1? 


US 


nrj»«.is 


13! 


LMUSITS 


tl 


LIUMI-i! 


•a 


IHjnT-ts 


B 


IMJJJK 


!!! 


LHH.N M 


M 


mom 


1 H 


LUJJflK 


B« 


1,UJ^N 14 


M 


LUMm 


1 11 


LU3«< 1? 


i 5i 


ixxxa igs2N9t 



Lil-T40( Fb 



14 4 49 

14 3 » 
14 1 9Q 



LEiMIN 
LUWH 

LUWM 

TL49*gi 
rL49tCP 
NES1U 
DESSSA 

hiaiv 

LM5MM 

Nf»«lf 
IMS«N 

lMi«Chi 
iMiv;?v 



Hf&/C*l 11 3 1^ 

LUTO^d;)^. I 1 It 

Lwrnti 11 49 

LM71{M 14 H 

LMnill 11 79 

1W7J» tl K 

l,U7iJ» 14 I 00 

LUmH Tl 1 95 

1U741CH I B 

lE4T4n tl H 

tU74t4i 1 iM 

Luiim 11 1 49 

LMHUa I H 

LU141IM tl n 

LU]4Mi| 14 A9 

IM144HI II EU 

LUIIOCM 11 I 49 

LMlCHh 11 1 16 

LUIKU II i3i 

LM21B1T 1 44 

LU3193A II I tA 

LM3F»M II » 

LU3?0»I| I I 19 

J,M3»» I n 

Lll]9U>) II 1.49 

LUJ91U II 3 49 

LW39l«*ii 11 3.49 

nC41HH 14 1;2t 

RHESlNl I I K 

IClWUS II 3 95 



HPR£ AHLUlLt 



Linear Data Book I '^ijjo:: i .$11:9S^ 



124 



CIRCLE 12 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Portable Speakers For 
"Walkman" Style Stereos 



fmm 



PortiblD Steieo Spoiker^ wHh Carrying Casa 

|t»M portjQH *ttrfu tpffrkm inlo jowr attrts gcv^ >Q%J ar»d rou" 
laiendi -can cnioy v-svr Ui'vila M^i rcprnfuoKt by litvfru FuM 'iaqb 
fp««ksn. 'C"Ul fiM ffl«e»l I'Oarrta, Ihfr b^ACft, ar in jchjI i^' Th«y 
i4«^p^ m 1 1 3 l]n trid nvtfiura H 'H ^ "I t "W i' ?t ' E. T hii uiut u»pi 3 ' 
I 5 Behm i-c4xi«ra aiIH j J qi. tnAgnoit Sotakiif a^t4/n irkdudH. 
I«Q flpcjIWfj. « cairyiniQ fi«i«, auiTiSiary ipOJhtr tOnntclpr cuDk. 
«n<9 jiannconiflclorcibtc Uua fl "AA" wlflrrH Cin be u-icd wi1 It 
toth CH^EablD itertet ihown ImJqu, Jiful la «atn(Mtlbh wiih tno»l 
(nini-porljiDia Jlcrvg CtHstEH «nd FM al«r«4uiiiEs 

Part N0.TSUOI2 $29.95 

AMS-a SAAAIkalinsBamriei «(ilrS7.M) 



ff 



stereo 
Cassette Player 

with FM Stflrao Tuner Pac)( 

• Llghtwolghl Haadphonfls 

Tape SaFeCtDf 

• AntJ-RohlIng Mocha nJsm 

FEATTJfleS- ■ BlUfl CJiTvinu taw, mauldof alrap. bun sl^ap 
liQhl^Hfii'ghE riQadjytwhfl D. FM itarao Funur pick a matruehon TianuAP 
* Ta>KlipiQ * Tons BfliBclor ■ C^d'^i'MalO^Fj orm>l ijj>« ula^t'Or ■ LED 
iQpV'riiijQ.ii indlcflicr * EluiH in (nie:i>£phoi*id *SIApfDj*cl, pifry. 
I ArwiMjrrevrDw^ lail PcrfwifdifuA. tapC'AdIo bDlMMiar runclaona * Vol 
'Ccnhol ■ Ext. powtr >npijl (oCK ■ HgiutpPiOnD |«i:it ■ Aulo-itop 
fno<h»nlvn (d-I^ue> »II 9\»<fVf whan |a(M «r)d») « JKhIt ro»lt[«g 
meenuniam jfuwitiila sound Item qui^rln^i nlwn ftaUMfq. le^l'^ 
die ) * Wo-ighl. 1 J 01 ■ F^vgui'oc 4 aA tBl:trri«i ^r\a[ ■nclL>3«9l' ■ Sua 



E 



Model TWF-802 .. . 

AUH-A AAAIkillneBallerlia 



.$69.9S 



A 



CREDIT CARD 
AM/FM RADIO 

World's Thinnssl 
Stereo H)-FI 

% * pgck^i^MB AhlrFM a1«t«o ta6\a *m 1 Tolding iterftQ li«i(]- 
phone It hvnighi |uit i ae. tnd nMKium 41"L K 2t'W x %'Trt^. 

fM3 AAA &l11fl4.o? Inol indttdwfj. 

PartNo.TCR-809 $Z9.95each 



h ,^^i ' 



JO YSTICKS 

TipBrPiKti 



lODX 1 
' TipffrPoit 



i5,25 



J5.15DK 



150K LInill 

Tiptr Pfftt 



i«.75 



jit-^u trdlii in Cjib 



JS^SK (Pieiurrfi --- ~ truiii In uiiE (4.95 

JS KM08 Knob lor JS5K.10<]K,1S0K S.99 ai. 

JVC KNOB Knob for JVC.4a S.S9aa. 



If 



ATARI PADDLES 

JSP (2) $4.95 pair 



TV GAME SWITCH 

Us&d on AtarL Cosmef- 
ic^lly blBmished. tOO'y* 
functional. 

TGS-1 . .,$2.95ea. 



BOOKS 

NATIONAL SEUICOMDUCTOA - IKTERStL - INTEi 

3000^ Nmli£>nAlCK0J0«Ue«K)l:(1ta^ . - U;K 

l&jg pace}} T*C. CCUSOD, and Mi CQn>r«r!«fi 
XiOtZ NitlenaLinivreactDatalMkilMi^ SIJS 

\7ii* psBBih □I', Dsaoco. D&aeu. osstod, aic 

xeOi IfiElQfulLiinairDaeaEMlKlHZr ., .tllJS 

11371^ ^gaal LU LF. AK. OAC. LH S4r1« 

10005 NJtienalTT1.Lo«leD>laBiMk'[1H1| flLtS 

lEi* pn-o^ah r4I» LS.L^.S. .uid DMKtt) Sarin 

30006 Above (3) 3(H)01,3,S as set^ $^4^^ 

XH01I HBthHiJitWviii9rvDataB»«i;lU0) (O.IS 

i:4«4 p«gaA| RAUa, HOUi. FHQUi,. EPROMiStflac 
soon gnlvraltCataBnikilUlt . MjH 

[13K pi^Li CtunpiH-a rina 
»Oia NjikHulAudlafAadbahlaMlbadklltU] . IL*S 

i:?^ paQHJ Pra Ampa, a,m. PM £ FM Sld<>fra. Powaf Ampt 
»Q11 HaikiAi9LieiaarAppdiealtenHanilb«k|]Ufl1. KUS 

k??& [lacc't'i Aipviiniii lain rfpiat, Linair Qiria>t, ale. 
»0i2 HillenalPALDit^llDaliCIM^ H.g; 

(l?apjgenDjlBSPM)o[ PAL CHna"' 
»0i} £llC9Da1i9wikn!U3h fTM 

i&it pagau Micro?raefla&ari anp ^ppOfi Chipft 
OTCMOQ InlalCprnpoMftlDalaB^wknU:; ... f14,JlS 

04M PC^ f^i*!' Otta iHeals For lAltl'a producla inci t*mm. 

devtcvi. rucfoprfiit , cfupn A and 'mil. product* 
SOMI'D liHatP«rtphwplP«>ki'nHa'idb»h(lM1) tff.VS 

[ftn P^aavi Full daia iht^ig, «nplicaiii3fi ngiea Tor iilul 

tt'iphMdl ddvici' 'CoiTiEiaiianta 



KEYBOARDS — POWER SUPPLIES 



M\-[:i1^-Wx U'M 



a'LuSWWxI'W'M 



n'Ly.t1,'VJx ^%■H 



4^ 



u 



OATANETICS 73-KB KEYKOARD (ASCK) >1ppf* Compat/bM 

IILrf hoiMM Ikti^. irSI ln<lMf. H-tm rift CKd I MIi a i M . HdHH pbl-HL 

■■ |4g.95tiGti 



Part ND.KB^GteHi DTE n 



HiCnO SWITCH eS KEY KEYBOARD 



PirtNs.eSSOlM 



STfcCKPDU «-KEY KEYBCAno 

tnT iifffelw|. ukUpiuI. khMVc JiHUBfl, t^tHl ftn t,ttun RaftHff n pw ■ 



PiriHe. H'ht tm Jin-ut 



HI T£K 14-KEY NUMERIC KEYPAD 



Pirl No K-14 



.«9.95» 



ALPS 29-KEV CALCULATOR KEYBOARD 

Ti^wt Hu t'pcieiM Uc^^ tthKC iirtilt, iatl-pHllai iwfltli, irtf twt Z-pafM* iMHch«, 

PirtNu. KB297Q4Dl.FHD(MiEKtfiTnh S4,e$«ic1ll 



roWER SUPPLY +5VDC(91 AMPREGULATED rranucNoi rvc'i 

Ihrirn tlVOtr: iitt*i]« vHYDC|(*g tn»yl11»ll'CKlii ^>p^[tUEl/lHtot|$«l■■M:M>ri 

tiM in !tmd buck |4inr Wi l^')-Wj 7~D ]:7^-H Wl. J bl DA IM ml 

PlMNlh P$51194 S19.»ttCll 



TOWER SUPPU -hSVDC a 3 AMP REBUUTEO 
iipri IDVAC, tT-MWi Quitiri SVDCUpjtilli D l»f.tVK ir: IM* M»iUayattf- 

firiWI, ItMi 4 ■(»*:■ aVrm.JHVp-i-^; m>Mk|ivtKM.tiLwa»ii4 lEuifHi 
4«l^"Li2^»11"H -Ht rih Dili 1M«I MUM 

Pifl Hb. OPS-1 ■ IZS.SSucH 



PflWES SUPPLY +5V0C ^ 7.5 AWP, 1ZVDC « l.S AMP SWITCHEHS 

tmvl 11&VAC, !)D>UIHxr/ lut/lUVAC. SIM:;r«' l,|i« Fviirff /pr■t^■>7p4VHb(1l(«l' 
[:h»|11&/rHvACl GtfipWI iv.0Cr^T.>4B*. ■J1'I>C<}'1 1i«Pf. Irt. H fiw. cwd lin"*;) 
13^^ D X j'-si'-n Wl t4i 
Par1Nj.P594VP . ;«.35ticti 



POWER SUPPLY 4-ChiniH.I SwHctilna - Appla Compatible 

MKrr^KtllV. nbU'EVnpuKr lii^ul n4h:JIf^»ilbnf«1 !■< prKlii iMrd ippkcJOBt. lA- 
Mi. »' 1 NVAC IM^MT Dutswi f AfK O- M. -SVK O 1A: + ITVK tM A. -1 f VK A iJt 
LhMEH i*2^. Hrjeh sexVi'A. Laalria.: i%% Dwsttnal •ntietlai AM SVinilntul- 
r*i*iav i-3v(-Ln.j/rTifi*.iByii"H.wi i*** 
PirlNo. ECS-$04A $G9 9Siadi 



POWEI^ SUPPLY Adjujia^lt Swhching t-UWt Its 5 Ampi 

jUf 4 .t4VK ; 3VK (7 &' ivfiC f! 1 U IVIK v? 4 r A. 1 rrm O 1 9A 1 1vDC o 1 u :^vctc 
<-! Vk OvKvMtH fniKtivi iHKE' ii$VliC H^HNi Mpirl VKHUvfl]. frthi* rOaV IZS'Li 

JESZJKfl S79.9SiaLh 

JE7^4AJt>MkW«T*iM S99.95ncli 



JUMPER AND CABLE ASSEMBLIES 




nfMet 


.Smi*- 


ouwi 




«Lii4] 


*H13I1u 


{MM-l 


•H1UM 


Ahvi^e 




□ M43-H 


tt*Tm H 


eM«3.4 


tM1MH 




STANPARD DB3S SEftlES CABLES 



.t CK^ if^ * t-sn i*rtqnt CaII ledtf . 
ttAWAHD CAILU 



4fm 



HJVJ-E 
D1HS.I4 



I CHZ5» $7JS 

1 E>BZ!» a.49 

1 aBrEiC'i Db?!iS 13.75. 

3DIIZ55 13,55 



BUG SOX^** — » Indc^iduil comp*5 brtianla 
* .Slw« to S-pIn or 30 14' ar Iflrptn OiPb ' Sud ruai 
Ml Includad ' CMnr plasLic [:A^r a1id» t ixix 
■ Covar marbtd tfrnutnEwfl 1-30 ■ Cijm^rlAMni 
mar 1 ' x 3.TS- k J " 4rBp * Bok tUfl': 4 1' x 3.3 ' i .6 ' 

BUG BOXTW 

PkJta apKiiv ccdor MKi« iQh ehrt. (Ft! Rad^ [Wl 

Wnii<i |Y)V«l)«w 

Pan Ko.^Colqf CeKl* OTT PBBE 



BUG BOX™ 

STORAGE 

SYSTEMS 

ADO CAOE''^ (BOCODT^ ] w4lh Sua S«i» 



BQY-nT-l 
BGXaiO-E 

BaxoioZ 


AHTtiTATiC 
kAS 

»AS 


1 

IS 

1 
Id 


1 L» 

1I.H 

t 3.2» 
»Jft 



BUG CAQE7H — iziDcatiooi lEora Bug B0;<««.. 
Big Bug BOva* tn EU»o Tfiyi ^ Uodular and in- 
torlockiivg > Heavy duly iri|ecti«n motdad plaalK 
' Eacn casa Hu li-p-oni Iputio^ ' 2 caffdi hi 
pkg < C«3D tita &tiB' X A* X ^I'A' ■4 cDl<>r» 
BvailBbr« — platilw »p*ci1r cdM «)da: CG|i Blua, iFl? 

nud. rwwniiff. lYjVatjiTH 



BGC 00t-[ 1 3 CagM <9 1oe. ».) $1 1 .9S/pVg. 

BUG TflAYTM _ sn„„ ,n aifo c»ff« - Moiaw 

prmi« * Throa atyiaa Ofxn^i torTij»Ji.m«ni 3.04' x 
44J'i.&*]: Vertrcil t^cafneaflmenti 5'ki4 g'^.G^r 
and HiDrlxOnr.»l 11 CnmpBrirmnLp 4' i 3.95' i B't 
' KfaaE \w 1O0l>. hard^ara. i;.pmppn»n[». aCc • Tray 
aiie S.SS' K 5 05" n 6" * BiKk color (Mily 
PAflTHQ. &ESCPIPTEQH PBtCE 



BTK-MM Horkz»<i1ai Bug Tray 

BTV'Oa> VanicflSugTjiy 

BTD'ODt Dpan Bug Tf ajr 

BTK'Hll \ 0) aach Bud Tray i|3|' 



f1J5 



BLJG RUG'** — sialic (TiKhBrufpraiacthwiof 
CMOS a^tf MOSFET dnmcti ' Pm-Hil le fiimap.- 
I^ng or DUG BOX (>'»:. 3&^ 
Pjiil Kc 



BBg^^3a 



Paacrtptlan Prfca 

Hraamii«tiAola>f«f BugbN tl.H 
Aloim raeJffflSI Big Bug Bqi 1-M 



CAGE KEEPeRi^" 

fi«>.n in BvQ Cbqb 



CKP-Ol* 



H.f4Jpt.g 
a.Mi'pfco. 



LSI BIO BUG BOXTH — OaiigMd to atora 
Eu^a IC'i, Ha&inEOri, Qa^^icataf 1 and piodas * DIvvd. 
pd inio ihrjfl cflmpal mania nnaMurniQ i* x *.(5' « 
.5' dacp ' Thraa vertical ind thraa honfonltl 
dJvldafft ific>ud»3l * atug Huga na( \t\ti\\, 
sue 4»' s33'» .e- 'We<DhE 1.?5m 
LSI BIG BUG BOKTW 
Pleaaa aiHciiy color code: 16) Bpu?, {RI Ftg^, (W^ 
VVtijta, m Yallow 
PART HPJCPLQfl CQOE QTV_PB!lCE 



liX-OQI-l 
BLX-OID-I 



AHTI-5TAHC 



a.7« 



] ( 4l^ 



3T,t 



BACK pack™ — »EF4Cm*tn[* m-t>\% (« ihr 
bach of iCi ' Sixnn eitaci miq^niil ictQic m raial.'Pn 
tc IC pina * 533 labala 'n aaci packao* >|»nclLjd>nB 
mtAiIiI brird: Iab4tai «Each packaga ler B U, 1&1 
Z*. n and 40'PLrt L-Cs. * CwtipiJ Ti4tlt.P9a inclr— 
1,069 labeii lor TTL and CMOS 
' M icrc^rixeiiH pacVaga CQn1a>.na744 Pit»lt 
Part No, Pa»wlp1te»i ' 



ICv 
"'"prite I 



flPTQia TTL . 

BJ'C.OIl CUO^ 

BPH-D12 Cdmbo 

ePU-013 U|kr>m>fKn«er 



.B.at 

.14.B5 



BUG TAGSTH — ScaradlMatYa, *iL»-to-f«d 
iab«i» rpr niartinQ Bjq Bai a^l LSI Big Bug Bo^t 
4 Uosi papular Eom^ottamita 

PABTHOi DCSCftlPTlQM OTt- PPUCE 



STT'JM 


TTL 


Toa 


mt 


BTC'ZU 


CMOS 


Mn 


4. at 


BTk-zoo 


l.iAe(»11%T 


2M 


4 u 


BTS-JM 


SGwdal 


sod 


4.H 


BTU.«0 


mw 


BOO 


13lH 



MQAf PVd fA(f j AVA^LriBLfr 



* * * BUG BOX SYSTEMS INTRODUCTORY SPECIAL * * * 

tmtMt»: Kfalir H lAb iljb: lAckiAi Mpi CABM 1U toubml: B-lk}l»n; MSI lis 1ki tmv. 1-iwtiiRUI lui Trt: 
l-ipn bg Trir: !-rtf1K9l tug Trvr. * titiip luf tlu9 >K rtfutw In tfm: I iMUif li>g Rbb >*. L^l 14 >u9 ■«<". 1 
PKhig« H^w UMi IBIH WLht. cttar. log lun i«4 Ctg*« ■ Ita. Ihb ^'rf ■ IVvh. 

SP.SUG Regular [n<ijii*i[iH3u.'<$> , Stit Pflc9 i49.95 

SP-BUG-aS An11.Stitlc(S.tni.i lu. U17.1H Stit filct I53.SS 



UniVBrtal 



Comptir Ksyboard Enclosurts 




DTE.8 PanalWIdth 7.5' (24.35 

DTE-11 Panel Width 10.13" Ur.SS 

DTE-I * Pansl Width 13.5" S29.35 

OTE-ai PonalWWtli 18.25" . . SJ4.95 



DTE 
LDTE 




SI 0.00 Minimum Order — U.S. Funda Only 
Cmlltornla Ftasidantt Add eu% S>l» Tax 
Shipping — Add S*/m plua $1.50 Insuranca 
Sand S.Ji.SiE. for MentMy Slfai FIrmr! 



5^ call <d'. 
-^ DUcounls^;^ 



£p*c SliMlB -- 30e each 
Sand I1.D0 Postaoe lor your 
FREE ^3B3 JAMECO CATALOG 
Pricdi Subjfrcl ia Ch«ns4 



Jl 



l^2B 



ameco 



ELECTRONICS 






1355 SHOREWAY ROAD, BELMONT, GA 94002 
5IB3 PHONE ORDERS WELCOME — f415) 5928097 Telex: 176043 



8K, 16K, 32K, 64K 
EPROM Programmer 




270d.27l«,2732 A £7&4 EPFtOM ProBrammar 

JE664 EPROM PROGRAMMER 

BK TOMK EPFOMS - 24 AND 26 PIN PACKAGES 

Sail 0«11apn*d — R-tqu^rat Md AddiElonil Syilam-i !□[ Op«r«1lon 

' muini. Mkkln. M iMtU kr ifiparlr hih-I a*Wi ' ERWiMi PIKIM 
■r [riOHi • WlHte C apg *t it luttrtica fef riBaa^ifWftii 1«^ * 
4* UN by kaffewrri * Claifii aib tt BU bf biMlri * ln^i K 



H 1UVAC. 
kH bill fw^ 



t*«tlll 



ISVAC. Hhi. -^ II 
Sih Bl 

JE6G4-A EPROM ProBumtnv 



'lb a HapHci 



Ludifjti 
. .. Ht.1t IfNiin 



ilHgwaw t f wM I »ffamlaijm&iLHa)>^.i 






JEE9& - RSZ3ZC INHRFACE OPTION - ^.'^ Jii^-i'^ir^ im^tKa 

Pat^ mpfft^ltl I II vJl t r aCtlW a 1M ;afel 1 BAW SVTvpltsatimwnlHhiKi 
BAJLC p[iN4fd IV TKflQ* WadH i Laid ii CwKKittr itaC r«ii K03 Mtvn 
LqHl I hll - MB jurti' $»« Wl 7 BlMiMI Wrp H timm to plhtr twuln 

JEGG4-ARSmaHrfai.w/nH9epiaB $1195.00 

EPHQM JUMPER MODULES — itaJtM^ * juuPtaMCDULEfPiruim 
Ef U MjHt^ 15 a plug in blaluliT irji cri wti JLSfr* Id »CW prMrjffVFing JHilWI Id 
r^ E^ROM 4 c«otr[nris efrcu e«UI tv.-nKtriMf Fv tw (jfLcuLii CPRDM 

Pan 

Ho. EPSOM EPROM MANUFACTUHEB PRICE 



JUIbA. 7^1E [WSH1G •nix UciC^pU I|]!«f4 BfC Tl 

J^UiH IwSzne WsUcab r<i ■;J..i3. -fI}] 

iU3^A TUSJU; UHpr4i. [4 

iWia ;7v AMo rLtmt. ntc NdKh iiw 

JM31C Z7KJi{?IVi rifOiB. KiU 

JU4W Mmeirai. 



t14« 



tj^ a" Floppy Disk Drive 



m 



' ShuigBM aoiR 
compstiblo 

• SinglC'SJdfld 
■ 77 Tracks 

• 400;8e>0K BylDB 
CapAcHy 

- Industry Standard 

Tp>e FDDiiOC-l 4" Floppy Olik tlciva |induiiry Siantfard! lenturai. 
ilnijia Of double dannty. (^(cording ni-oda: f*A ungH. MPM doubia 
daniilly Trdn^fer race. i5QK bUnUBC. .Bangld dfenllly; 5C0({ tnl-il»*c 
di»rt<a ^natLy. Tiv F[>PiOO-( la d^icneti lo worn mtn 1ti« iing^ 
tidad Botl uclHod IBM Ohikatta i, or aq. dli^ carlridg*. Pcr/iti. 
1I5VAC S0"«HJ, * WVDC a 1-7 Wfi^ mai.. t SVOC & l.Jflinps 
mtx Un>.1 M [hictur*dBbD'Mldo«anoll4iciudauaa, pewarauppiy^DT 
oabbnuli. SI^b: S.55'W jj l^'L X t.^'iH- WalghA 12 Eba. Iik|. Qfrpg. 
untingH, 
Pari Ha. PhUw 

FDD10<^e Buy t for «26&.«5 each 

FDD10<^ Buy 2 for S259.95 each 

F£9£77£K^A Buy ^O/or ^4^,95 ncft 




5^4" Mini*Floppy Disk Drive 

FOR TRS^O MOOEi, I CliVluairt SiaMlf nil 
faHuro'S amgU or doubi* danaily, RKor^ln^ 
nMHt. FMungla^MFMtlDubiadanftily Poimr: 
-»lJVK£ = OW|l-&Am*r„ *5vtjqrta»vj 
BA \fnjc. U(i4E B> pic:. r,t right (dP«4 lUE ln£E. 
caK, poirH b]W>ly. cablaii. K-pg. dAtiboDk 

Pad No- Umntd Ovan EiTyJ ftitt 

FD200 S179.95 

SlrHjIraldcd, 40 Iractt, ODK byi» cBparliy 

FD2S0 S199.9S 

[]»ubla-iMtd, is Iraejia, UBK b/t« cppvcjly 



EXPAND YOUR MEMORY 



TRS-80 to 16K, 32K, or 4eK 

"-MgOII 1 - Frill 4K In 1GK Ftlqulri! [tj Dm K» 
MDdll 3 > Friin IK to 48 K Ftiqulrts (}) Thm KlU 
Celei 1= Fnn 4K In 1GX Rtqukil (1) Dni Ktt 

"MtW 1 HwHAJ rth IifJ«.*i lurl If U (IK Tn XU Kt^U^ 
- Qu JCk bvpiti hr <uh su al Eifm^ - 

TH5-1GK3 '2D0nl tor Color & Model III S12.9S 

mS-16K»"J50ni tor Modell. , . S10.9S 



TRS-BD Color 3ZK or E4K Conversiiin Kil 



4<ll cocnai compiala nllh 9 iich 41C.4'2 CfOQna^ U K c^namlc RAUi 
jmd tom^igion docjmenlaHon. Convc'ti TRS^BO cdEdt oomputHi 
With D and E eircuil bo*tiit, tni ail naw ulv com^uEar^ 10 32K. 
Hiiwr mcOllDcaliDnB oT Z2K. nMmoEy will allqrw ihi ua e i3l all (MK fit 
l^a dyrviuTitcftAU providing youi hav<« FLEX OOS oparallng ayalarr 



TRS.64K2 



.$54.95 



G 



Sprite-style Fan 

• 36cfm free air dBtlvery 

• 3.135' sq. Jt 1.665 depth 
- 10 yrs, conL duly al 20"C KfHtiri'fi 

• 115V 50f60Hz 




l?^- 

;|l*^. 



Muffin-style Fan 

',» • lOScirti iree air dehvery J^l^^^ 

' -J-Sa^'sq. Kl.SQ-doptn ^f"™? 

• lOyrs coni. duly at2Q"C h^^)^ 
■ Impedance protecitd.arirvbienls to 70 "C 

• H6V SOreOHi 14W Wr. 17 oj. 



MU2A1.J 
■MU2A.1N 



dluMdl 



S9.95ai. 
SH.9S<I. 



Mostek DC/DC Converter 
+ S VOLTS TO -9 VOLTS 

Input * av OjEpui iv fraQulaLtdr {I ^rniA. 
Prifii..d circuit rT.«ur.tirtg. Spffcilltstlons inci 
DC1D i2.Umm.a!2l%*.!)i J 



> 

-< 

ca 
u 

125 



CIRCLE 12 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




#'S 












»s*l>''\.o*,.^- 















,^"> 






.^^ 



.**'^ 



..vtf' 



^c^' 






JP' 



:.€5^^x 






.^" 



.-.c^' 






.^^^ 












-*:>^ 






^^^' 



if there were 
no distributors? 

If there were no electronics distributors . . . we'd have to 
invent them! As manufacturers of electronic products, 
we're convinced that the absence of distributors would 
cripple our industry! You'd have no convenient local 
source for fast off-the-shelf delivery of needed products. 
Production lines would grind to a halt .... handling small 
orders would be a nightmare. Paperwork would increase; 
costs would increase; expediting would increase; chaos 
would increase. 

As a buyer of electronic components, you benefit from 
the existence of distributors, even when you don't directly 
utilize their services. They make the factories you deal 
with direct more efficient — in marketing, in scheduling, in 
economy of scale. And, whether you need a source for 
fast delivery of standard products, for comprehensive 
technical information, or for assistance on any aspect of 
your procurement function, your local distributor can — 
and does — fill the bill splendidly 

Distributors help us — by serving you. 

The companies bringing you this message, as their 
contribution toward helping "sell the system," are among 
the over 150 member firms in the Distributor Products 
Division of the Electronic Industries Association. 

For information about joining this group of manufactur- 
ers who sell through electronic distributors, contact 
Herbert Rowe, Vice President EIA Components Group, 
2001 Eye Street, N.'W,, Washington, D.C. 20006. Tele- 
phone (202) 457-4900. 



DISTRIBUTOR 

PRODUCTS 

DIVISION 







%a. 






X 






-^i? 

<^;*- 

**."> 



■W., Vj, ^f^o *-w 












""S'r, ' 












PROFESSIONAL 

TECHNICIANS A SEftlffCEMEN 

WE CAN SUPPLY ALL THE COMPONENTS FOR YOUR 
MAINTENANCE, REPAIR & DESIGN WORK 

REPLACEMENT FOR E CG ® TIT PES (Min.S pes. each type) 

TYPE YOUR TtPE YOUR TYPE YOUB 

NO. PRICE NO. PRICE NO. PRICE 

85 30 152 40 375 99 



YOUR TYPE 

PRICE NO. 

. .30 152.. 

. .25 153.. 

. .95 154.. 

. .45 165.. 

. .45 238. . 

. .85 291.. 



YOUR TYPE 

PRICE NO. 

. .40 375... 

. .40 500A. 

. .85 523 . . 



.40 500A 8.95 

.85 523 10.20 

2.25 526A 10.75 

,2.25 712 1.25 

.99 852 4.95 



$1 

1$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 
$ 

$ 
$ 

$ BTOirifPiTi[j i -Mihii?ifimnn(iiiff i iit i Tfii i - i 'i i i iiii iii i riiii^ $ 



SUPER SPECIAL (Min. 5 pc. each) 

TYPE NO. VOUR PRICE 

276 6.95 EXACT REPLACMENT FOR SG613H 



SPECIAL JAPANESE TYPES (Mm 5 pes each) 

2SC867A...,2.75 AN214Q 1.45 UPC1181H . .. 1 .25 , 

2SC1172B...1.95 M51515BL...2.95 UPC1182.,,, 1.25 
2SC1308K...1.95 TA7205AP . . . 1 .25 STK435 3,95 



FOR A COMPLETE 1 983 COM PONENT CATALOG CALL OR WRITE 

CALL TOLL FREE 800-526-4928 

IN NEW JERSEY (201) 379-9016 

COD ORDERS WELCOME {$25 Min. Order) 

DiGiTROn ELECTROniC 

110 Hillside Avenue, Springfield, N.J, 07081 

i -ECG IS A TRADE MARK OF PHILIPS EGG. 

DIGITTION ELECTRONIC IS NOT ASSOCIATED IN ANY WAV WITH PHILIPS ECG. 



CIRCLE 87 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



DON'T 
FORGET 




USE 

YOUR 

READER 

SERVICE 
CARD 



12VDC DIGITAL CAR CLOCK AMD RALLY TfMGR 



!<■ -11 i™.. aiT-.-t L . : ■ - 1 

>.'T. li'i i;:i :.-iii,'T r . ■ .■ ■;-■■, 1' 
. E tv: -IS Kii "J *•" ULL cii'*';'!", 

'I'." i«kC)<H£4b ^lUL^TE, I-r.raTTC 

iiLiE -lUtiT rtiPSi.* ri t rt* »*u.t 
'i<i» ri n, tihi^i^E LCKtcv uitt :«: 

lLCR \Vs tV. ^ySTf CBHITIL TJ-I 
m, ClCC* itiC rfiTHII BflltHl-r-iM 
r,*'!-:!., H.tC-uiri '.ItPLlt 1>L<:^4IU 

-■'(^ jCkLiTifk II =rr i-^A 'rPficT ti:L. 
■Lv ^'' r f i.'f* r, ^ M^'t The irt^vi 
li "JiVC •'*l- *([h 'K Clt|il«»LlT tCL~ 
■.*! 17?.ft I'JT ■! r-C^'T SiVC Tht C«BTl 
■if uf ■« 1ELL|*& Ti-l" ■■ TmII LM 

■iii-r. ^im'ttt', ''Ti'i' , 




C4757 S12.95 



FfLDHT BEICL 1 mUTTDHS 

.ivLiii* t^J>^i riuhr mix «iin' 

I^ILT mil NES FILIEP 4.h9 '.h4»<E 



C4JI21 (3.00 



24 HOUR UNIT 

I IUL4.> I l'[J. u, 

<l XiEtl t>;^[*l Kl-H 

r* 111-* H.ILL f.liT TmC 
Tl'^b TLS^Etl rn" C'LI 

■ I klOin'il !•* M ri'<fl ■' 

■ flC^:" ELG^* * FE-^FLtl 
C.1i TO TnEiA LTH il,),,. 

C4034 $T2.S5 



JLMBO R£0 LCfi 



9 



1/4 W 1K» AtfrT 



C144A Sfl/tl^O 



QAf IH QLOW HEDH 



C44S1 l/ll^O 



C493d tij^fi 



cioBBi sen 



C443fl HBC 



ALCD KWOB 



C9«J| 1/tl.DO 



lOaOV }AUP MCCY 



C444A ft/»1,l>a 



REGUCJ^R HfcOHS 



C4Af4 a/t1.{]t> 



HOPlBfSHOE 

FLAtHTUBE 



C47S2 $2.G9 



juubO ycllqw led 



UIHI lU&E BW 






C447a E/11.0D 



JUMBO OnCEN k£D 



e 



C301S A/|1.Da 



.^-^ 



TM-ITATE LEO 



C39«B 7E< 



HEED SWITCH LED tlT^ 1f.U\ 

el 

C3B40 B/t-VJIO C17B7 ll/tl^O 



CHAIMEV 

^r' eiectroniCB mc 



P.O. DOX 37038 

Df fIVtfll. COLDRADQ SQ277 

303-79 V&7E0 



di 41 yi l.>r pgu-ff* lUt'SI 



' fiV Otis- ^r*t cj «?as f i;,nnriM- j i 



RNd Electronics, §ncm 

r.O. eOX»l tOS ALBANY AVENUE LINOENHURST. N.ir.11?&; 



CANYOUBELIVE! 

B&K 1535 
5" Ouil Trade 35 MHZ 
TRIOGERED SCOPE 





El CO 275 

31/2 DIGIT LCD 

Digital Multimeter 

wv/carry case 

44.95 



List Price S950.00 

Our Price 8D7.5D 

Less MIrs Rebate 

Direct to You 75.00 

YOUR FINAL CDST 

732.50 



CORDLESS 
PHONE ;, 

113.95 ', 



'f- 



c 



l/ 



LODP ANTENNA 

AN4 J-^i -30 

.23 



aOWTIETYPE 



100-up 

AN5 

1-24 .65 

25.99 .59 
100-up .55 



SACK OF SET 
ANTENNA 

1.85 






EXTENSION PHONE 
w/Holster 

^^ 13.99 



DUAL MaOlJLAR,^-!w 
BOAPTQR [Q;>: ^ 1^ 

T13- 1.90 -'-^■'-^;V"' 



MODUtftR JACK COVER 



^ 1.65 



VIDEO ACCESSORIES 
MODEL JOO 




jEfifiOLD WIRELESS 

eOCtiarincI 105.00 

Now Oesciarrblei 



46 Channel W 

CONVERTER 

FOR TVS 

VTR Cable 

VHFt»UHF f„^:''lJ ''"« 
tun inq knob 

27.50 ea 5/1 20.00 




TV GAME SWITCH 
AN45 n ., 

1.25 ea F_| 

iOOohm inand 
DLII with 
RCA rilug 




ALSO: 2SC1303K I.OOea 

I ODD Ft, RG59U 44.00 

1DC0 Fl lEga 

Speaker Wire 34.00 
L!('12S.75<: LXI62.3.49 
LX129 85« LXI63A3.69 
LXt54. 1.05 LXI66 "3.25 



DISTRIBUTION Model 435 

AMPLiFIEF i'^M 

vhf/uhf fm ItlHI 

With FM trap 18 00 

Designed for TV/VCR 
mpliiple-set installaiiani. 



FLIP THRU THIS 
MAGAZINE - IN 
MOST CASES YOU 
WONT FIND IT 
CHEMI C ALS-TUBES- ETC FOR LESS! 



VHRFM AMPLIFIERS, 

Model 41 1 For 2 sets 

All solid itate 

signal aFTpliljer 

boosts weak signals. „ nv 

Model 414 ■■™ 

For up to 4 sets-Signal gain 3 dfi 

10.95 




VHF/UHF MATCHING 
TRANSFORMERS 

1-24 .40 

Z-99 .36 

looup .32 

VHF.fJHFTb-aOOohm 
Model AN IS 



CALL TOLL FREE FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
800 645-5833 too 

OPEN 24 HRS - 7 DAYS A WEEK MMtEBCARn 



CIRCLE 24 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



POPULAR CHIPS 



LM301 

LM380 

LM386 

NE564 

LM565 

MC 1330 

MC 1350 

MC 1358 

MC 1458 

MC 1496 

LM 1889 

7808 

7812 

7815 

7818 

MV2109 

2N2222A 

MCI 349 



.39 

1.25 

.79 

2.50 

.89 

1.10 

1,00 

1.10 

.49 

1.50 

1.95 

.75 

.75 

.75 

.75 

.69 

.30 

1.39 



■r 



CHOKES 
.33 uh 33 uh 

,47u44 100 uh 

15 uh 10 mh 

ie uh 69«each 




MITSUMI 
UES A55F 
VARACTOR TUNER 

CHAN. 14-83 

300 ohm INPUT $17,95 



CAPACITOR KIT 

Each kit contains: 

1-560 pt (m) 1-11t)p[ (s) 

7-.1 rotd (m) 1-560 pf (s) 

1-.22nitd (ra) 1-1200 p( (s) 

2-10 pf (5) 1-3000 pr (s)or 

1-43 pf (s) 3300 pf (s) 

nn=monolythic,s=silver mica 
55.95 ea KIT-1 K ITS $49.50 



THUMBWHEEL TRIMMEF1 POTS 
VERTICAL MOUNT 

OHMS 500, IK, 2K, 6K, 10K, 2EK 
50K. 100K, SOOK. 500K. IMEG- 
4/S1.00 100/$20.00 



# 



3/S" SO. TRIM POTS 

TOP ADJUST 

IK lOK 

5K 20K T9< ea. 



VAHI CAPS 
1 - 60 pf 696 each 
30 - 90 pf 69t each 



UHFAMPKIT 

25 db ^ain 

St ri pi rue PC board 

jsing 

.(2) BFR-M'S 

{9,95 
power supply 
for above $3.49 



METAL BOX- 
PRE-DRILLED 

DIM;10»iWil41.Wii3-Higtl 
HOLES; (4)ii in tjaoli. (tj^i In Iront 

^2)Vm" in Iront, 6 *6 on boHom 

PAINTED t10.9S ea.. 10/$99.S0 

25/f223.75 



Xs 



RF COIL 

Same as #49A537MPC 

Sl.SOea. 1D/$12.S0 



NETWORK SALES, INC. 

2343 W.BELMONT AVE. 

CHICAGO, IL, 60618 

312-248-3202 



TERMS: VIm, M.C, ChecK, 

Money Orrjef or COD (add 

3.00). Min. Ordvr StO.Od. Add 

S2.50 S&H lor USA 111. >dd 7^ 

Tm. MAIL ORDER ONLV. 

Ptiona Drderi WvEconie. 

WRfTE FOR OUR MONTHLY 

UN-ADVERTISED SPECIALS 



> 

to 

03 



127 



CIRCLE 91 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



CIRCLE 90 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



I hTATIOIVAL SEMICONDUCTOR ■ PaNASONI 



* - * COMING IN MA K • - * 



EEMICAL5 - ARIES * PLESSEY • MOLEX ■ C 



'"}^:TI^^L jy^J!?*pf ^'^"^ flesistors „ , Low DIG/KEY Price 



ilMYeeHfllED^IHCijlTS 11 INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 









'.'a 










111 « 






{SB 














































Si£ 








33XS 






















!S 
























n;;! 








































lis 








it 


'K 


H» 








1! ti 


il 


35 


fj,-i 






















lltS 


iiti 


££ 


KS 


















!lti 
































4 vm 


lU 




lliJ* 


















:J!S 


iiS 


IBS 


HMM 








































■ » 






Tt iSi 


ta 


Sji 


Wl'S 










)l M 




















































gj*} 




































n ui 








^K 


Hiai 


>S3 
























SH 




: 





















2I» IHZl l<H3l 



to 

O 

z 
O 
cc 

H 

o 



o 

< 




TANTALUM SUBSTITUTES 
PAHA5QNK h SERIi^ CAPACITOR^ 



n» o 




H 


im 


um 


■mm 


Pin n 




B 












H 


£4 


un 


TI]> 


*PM -a?^ 




■ 


JH 






■rto4 sa 




m 


ttt 


"7W 


mil 


IV» 19 


V 








m?^ 


flKt «? 




■ 




tilt 




ntsT 10 




11 




1TS 


1H'Z 


not 23 












Ml U 








TDK 


mil 












liT* 


Mill ij 




>■ 


f A 


i*n 








XDi 








a 


B 












H 




muk 




F*1» » 




Ir 


_J*P 


BH 


Srti 








Tl* 


l$9A 


Hit 4 3 


M 


u 


zsr 


ITS 








B 


tB 










B 


m 


HH 


lUtf 



Panasanic TSUV Series 



^J4 

tod 


in IS 


pwtki 


VMuf* 


a 


1 


*"»* 


SH 
















i«»ii 




4Kn 


ifs 


11 it 


i-Oto 






nua 




■KB 




mai 


l-MH 












Z3JK 


"WW 




iHn 




XT3 


;Km 


^ii 


















P4Mt 




ttn 








Jlu 


jsiii 


F«m 




IJQ3 


im 


JOJS 


i»^ 


l*SM 




H» 


3-11 


»KI 


^ix 


PHW 




toon 


141 


WU 


111 » 






fV&LD 




ttjsa 


in 


■*'l 


y»m 




Min 


hftii 












»" 


rtfui 




Txa 


in 


14 91 


lUH 


FKri 




n!» 


3'H 


>3'D1 


in Id 


iwi* 




IK4 


133 


naa 


230 ID 










wm 




jira 














4'V 


4J IJ 


3T?W 


HH 




mfi 


i!« 


ii£ta 




ii.4e 


U1 PA 


fW^I 






7E» 


a AT 


iJA&ft 










yjw 


|71> 


M« 


jSflpo 










•»» 


■ K 


HflT 


UIH 






HBI 




HU 


1>T 


■1 >2 


«x tn 


■Ub 


i»iii 


Pttu 


im 


















lOCO 


J*? 


SI t& 


2SX 






PKH 




u« 


i«* 


41 H 


mH 


/«T 


« 


PtbH 












/ lOHfll 






m 


I« 


IT.O^ 


34IK 


OHLT 






«D 


<« 


MM 


3itllK 


: 535" 




»D 


lU 


J!» 


rfH 


171 >9r 


























iM 


■■« 


M'',' 


w'*e 



ii«f5"W» do'invtltolpltitasnili' i«Aim irifn^ ^^y tj D.g 'iliT™! b^cwni-rw^lwa .aiwr^d.uftifii, lrtfliiihatoifiwttHfcrtfflhl»M»*Wii;f*dti, fht <EBVICE rHaDl!^F< UDEUMF lll^ff^llMT 

wr^ . Utim mit^ THT brilir. tvM nl^ b1 ih, di«a,.i^.. 1 p.nk ond ^f ih. uK-ot- * r* d.« im* Fa iWi tytmioi, 8d4 rh- r*n-4« witali4* ,t<m» IS.^ u-M , „ « 7^ „ ?S ., ?« . n ™7* oc ^i ^^'^^ "^ ' 

*NIII««llllt|TFMH.aU, |,J»WfcJI4*[lM.a..lb,,M«JI|.«l-4*J4>l»^.«lt«*^l».M0rK^^ J*?fll * JlimlM:" flSSlo'io' 2™ SSU":?^ t^ll-; 

r»j rfw, PQt b, chKk. -nonn orif Hoil*r Ctog*. VlU vr C 0.0 DfQI-Kf V 0V4ff AMTEE; *fT (wt* aif ffWlWP* FVihaitd ffsffl 0-j.Ht rhfl! pf*np tb b* dat«ri«r *1I tw » 30.00 tM.99 . Add 40-71 » SOO.OO »«».»9 Uh 30'. 

-*F^«r o- Murtlrt il rrfvn^ wihn. «0,d9ri S'a^ riK^i^t •iHi n crpT cf pus* in.^f ITOO.OO J, IJp No Chorgv 1 tOOa,D0 A Up L#M a J'. 



128 



CIRCLE 39 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




^e^pmnrpar^thKk nvwt er^. NV'ttir (.rDrgf VlV^vrC 00 Oi'G/^KCV' GiUARANTfC: A<tf pfv1v«piatf[KTipu'tr«HdlignDqi itr chat vgm 30, OO-tW-'V? Adilio ?A t »)D.DD.'bW9.'4Q J.«»?0*. 



> 



CIRCLE 39 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



129 



Touch Tone Generotor] 
iMini-Kit 

-95 



r5 



10 (5D *5 ' 



|U5E WITH AMY ^ X J SWITCH MftrHIX 
] PAGE DATA BOOH 93' 



, IHVlSiaa ALARMS _ 
ISCiFNCE FA I ft PROJECTS! 
\$^CRiT COUMUhlCATION^I 

INFRA-RED 
|Emitter/De1ector| 
PAIR 



Ml 





6 VDC 4PDT 
Reloy w/Socket| 
cueE ryPE i I'SQ J ^ 

COLD CONTACTS 3 A 
*l 



REED 
I SWITCH 



.95 



ID/*I7 50 
a LB R-1290 , 




20/' I J 



ELECTRONIC BARGAINS 

If you're no) on our moiling list, you're 
I missing outstanding buys on the finest 
in eiectronic parts for ttie builder in 
8 years over 250,000 tiobbyists tiove 
discovered wtiere to find usefui, unique 
or downright stronge eiectronics at give 
away prices. Why not send for our cat 
|olog today! IT'S FREE! 

I Street I 



VHF/UHF^ 

CHtNaCL >-I 
iriDJIAHO 

Varactor 
TUNER 

HI 'SAIN, tnkm 

'HtH, FOR UPGRADE OR 
COKIfEBTEJ USE. 
||F <HJTPIJT. USES tlZV IHD tm 

suppLi. r-N»! m i/i 11 

4' LINE 
CORDS 

io/»L50 

WT 2 LB C'lMO 




I City _ 
'state . 



.ZIP. 



<>! 



lAIViaiMDBACK 

♦ electronics company 

♦ pO box 12095 Dept 102 

♦ SARASOTA, FLA. 33578 
Phone Orders (813)953-2829 

I CONTmENTAL U5 ADD «I.QO FOR THE FiRST LB ■■Hi 
AMD to* FOft lACH A&DITIOWAL L6. [ TL^ 

WEST COAST ADD "I 90 fOP TME FIRST POU^O & ^Hfl 
^< FDR EACH ACi^mOHAL POUND 3^ 



\Z VAC 




300 mA 

ADAPTER 

,' tDRD WITH' 

POWER nue 
*2,25 

lO^JlS 50 

(00/ * 165 
230 *T 0.5 Lfl 



CniU?<N$ TOOL FOfi RE-KB, Rfi-SS 



' VT0.4 L8 



F-3t A-;S40 S/M VT I le 

UALE CABl[ CONNECTOR FOR R-Q-H 
F-59 A-2545 4/M 0.1 IB 

MALE CABLE tOHHE^Tpfi FQR RG-59 



PC BOARD «t>. 
SUPPLIES >A^ 

«t HtVE tvE«T'mHS tou KEEDJ 



PC BOARD 

1/16" GHO Copper Clad 

MQflUlL COST E*Si 
iHAKiD IHtAHJ, *ON'T Z^k-^K CA ^Ml* 
tOQD KAfl'lE.Tr PF SUM. NOUt 
THAN >"!( ir INCLUDtS SOMt 



101 LA £[}g && IN I 



PC .0 



'4 



95 



ETCH ANT 
Ammonium Persulfate 

^AST B €ASY Td- USt, WIX A UAL^ 
OOJND It) A GALLDN I OZ TD I PuiiT 
OF WJt^>Ln AND L7LHI THE tfHlTt 
CRtJTAi.S MAIil Jl Cl.£An JOLUTlflN 

That tub**! ej.yE *rt[h full of 

CtH'I^En . LB ttlKES i ilALLONl 

H-aa*n ^ 



S|95 S|7 

I 10 LI € I 



SOLiD CARBiOe 

PC DRILL BITS 

Lasi 1000's of (irnes 
longer than std bils! 



STOCK 1 



S-O-SDO 
C-D-20 
D-{rt65 
05JO 
0-0595 



_ SiJE 

tfrO G^OO 
*59 042D 
*^ 046S 
*55 05JD 
#53 0595 



10, 



>/15 



SI 50 



74SI24 

OUAL VCO 

CRYSTAL Off HC 

I HZ TO as WHI 

I& PIN OIP 

DA^A SHEET ?5t. 



r ALARM MATS 

M% SirilCH wHfJJ STEPKO 
1 T4PESWITCH ktDDEL CVt>^™5?>^,,,, ,s 
|t?J IS UL APPROVED ^^i^m^y^ ''^ '^° 




TAANSFOflHFR 

BALUN 



ALL TV CMANN£LS 
PLUS fU /^/^ i^ I 
75il TO MMVJ 
50QJI 



89< 



LIGHTED 
5 -Pushbutton Assy j 

SWJTCriCRAFT SERIES 37tW0 f 

OPOt $[1.VCR LEAFS 

,9' >1 .6* BUTTONS 
I MV 50,000 HOUR BULBS . __ -v ,- 

LIST OVEft *30 00 S ■< vJ K 

I UDUENTARV vJ • -J ^J 

^ B-JOIt WT0,4 le 10/* 35 



CIRCLE 49 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




1^^v^llrc■ 



I PHASOR PAIN FIELD — Patentet) and rscentiy devefoped 
1 in our labs is freifig lesjed Qy Gcv't for riot control. Soon to corns 
I under weapons restrictions as an infernal machine. Easily tiand- 
I Md Ha/ardous IF NOT USED WI1H DISCRETION 

I ppf-1 PL*ftS(soi[t for animal control) *1S.OO 

I INVISIBLE PAIN FIELD GEN ERATOR — Produces i di- 

I rectionaJ tieid ot .moderately intense pain to bar^tr ot tiead up to 

1 5Q ' . Crnarette pack size enclosure is easily triPden 

llPG-3 PLANS JT.OO IP0-3K KITS PLANS $4*.S0 

I IPG-30 (assembled tor animal control) .... J59.50 

I PHASOR STUN^BURNING WAND — Produces sntlicient 

I electrical energy capable ot burning tlesP Intended as 3 person- 

Ijl defense device 

IpSW-3 PLANS .M.M PSW-3KKIT&PLAMS .S59.50 



■ RUBY LASER RAY PISTOL — intense visible red. burns, 
f t>ajardous.withpanssource$ 

^ RUBV PLAN S I incio Pes all part sources) $15.00 

■ CARBON DIOXIDE LASER — Generalss 20-40 waits ot 
M conlinuoiis power capable of tjurnmg. cultrng. tiazardous. [wnti 
; all part sources! . St 5.00 

■ LASER RIFLE — Produces 200-MOO pulses ol 30 wait opti- 
|A cai energy Porrableandea$ily haod-beld 

t LRO-3 PLANS S10.00 

ILBG-3KKITPLANS(ninu5diode| S1 29.50 
POCKET LASER — For the beginner, visiOle reo "oolieal 
versipn". non.fiazardous 
LHC-? S5.00 LHC?K KIT !, PLANS J24.50 

HIGH POWERED PORTABLE ENERGY SOURCE 
FOR LASERS AND MAGNETIC WEAPONS - Explod- 
ing wires. snQckwa\/e. etc Mmiasure size. 
HPS-IPLANS .S8.00 HPS-tKKITJPLANS. .M9.S0 

PARTICLE BEAM WEAPON - PLANS S15.00 



INFINITY XMTR — Uses teieptione lines foi selective tiome 

arofticeiisleningwtiile away on business or vacation 

INF-t PLANS.' ... J15.00 

I SEE tN DARK — Long range, total darkness. 

ISO-JPLANS ... .. ttO.OO 

I LONG RANGE WIRELESS MIKE - Crystal dear quality 
-miniature 

I FBI .7 PLANS $7.00 FBT-7K PLANS & KIT , $34,50 

WIRELESS TELEPHONE TRANSMITTER — Long 
ranpe. automatic. 
VWPM-5 PLANS S10.0O VWPM-5K PLANS S KIT $34,60 



Send tor FREE catalog descripEon ol above plus tiundreds more 

plans, kits and completet! items. We accepi MC or Visa or wtien 

I orderinp. send check or money order, We pay stiipping ctiarjes 

I en orders over S50,[)0. otfierwrse loclude 10% with remrltance, 

SEND TO: SCIENTIFIC SYSTEMIS 

DEPT. F6, BOX 716. AMHEFST, N.H. 03031 




OVER 70,000 ITEMS IN STOCK 



DISCOUNT PRICES i€^ 

ON ALL MAJOR INDUSTRIAL AND PERSONAL ELECTRONICS 



am 



^ 



T20O SlHTidard 

Solcffring Gun 



WELLER 

SOLDERING TOOLS 
fUlL PROFESSIONAL LINE 



XCELITE 

TOOL CASES 
COMPLETE WITH TOOLS 




WTCPN Soldering Station 

Closed Loop • Auto Temp • 
Ligtitweigtit • Pencil Iron .$72.35 

72D0 Soldering Iron 

Ligtilweiglit • Fingertip Triager • 
Self Support Back S10.99 



ll- 






J 




CO 

o 

z 

O 
(r 

h- 
o 



UJ 

o 
a 
< 

EC 
130 



urn 

Computer Center • Mosi 

Popular Flat Ribbon Catjie And 

Connectors For All Applies- nij » 

lions ■ Flat Cable In Grey Or Color-Coded ALPHA 

And Connectors 9 throuoH W WIRE»CABLE«TUBING 

DB25P $1.46 

DB25S $1 .25 CALL FOR MORE 

DA51 226-1 S .98 COMPUTER SPECIALS 



EVERY ELECTRONIC NEED 
INCLUDING DISCOUNT TEST EQUIPMENT 

iO053U593 

CALL TOLL FREE FOR MORE SPECIALS 
AND SAME DAY SHIPMENT 



TC Series Willi Wide Range Of 
Tools ■ SturctySpacious ■ Pro- 
fessional • Solid Wood Frame 
♦ Classic Cover 

TC-100 S346.95 

TC-150 279.99 

TC-200 176.75 




AMPEX 

VIDEO TAPES 

SPECIAL PRICING SALE 



New Quality Conlrol Video 
Tape For Home And Proles- 
sional UsQ, 

L-500 2 HOUR BETA $6.95 
T-120 5 HOUR VHS S9.85 



TOTAL ELECTRONICS CENTER • LOWER PRICES • IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

WM. B. ALLEN SUPPLY COMPANY, INC 



1601 BASIN STREET, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70116 
LOUISIANA ONLY TOLL FREE 800 462-9520 



CIRCLE 47 on FREE INFORMATION CARD 



V-^lADWiVNCED 

T Z^CXIMPUTER 

^/PRCHXJCTS 






MICROPROCESSORS 



16K Apple" Ramcard 




LIST t95 
ACP 

95 



'59 



• Full 1 year warranty 
• Top quality — gold fingers 
• Expand Apple II 4SK10 64K 
Compatible witti Z-60 Softcard' 
• Allows system to run with CPIWT. PASCAL, 
DOS 3.3, COBAL, Visicalc, etc 
Supplied with extra 16K RAM £ has (2) LEPs 



32 K STATIC RAM 

Zor4MHi 




Dm 

11141'! 



tflK * h«x Kit SI &g.35 

1«K,1MH£iUT --»o„c2179S 
3?K 4 MH£ Kat '^ **'-*'*-?»*«. 

* 32K J ^Wr MT • 3:39.00 

BARE BOARD 39 95 

Ba/eBdwvjIii^arlsFesaincm. i3^.9S 



REPEAT OF SELi-OUT 
58 ley UnericittfEd K^oanJ 



TMl'Cfl CVflU 5S hey [enninaJ K«yt»ard 
manuri.ctur«Jby{tni9jorfrianuracluirar. 
II la UFKOdHS V\\Y\ SPST Vs<i* unal- 
lachod 10 any PC board. Sc^lc^ mol(f»d 
plBtlJd t" x4"^vi. 



Unencoded 
Key Pari 

iSkayKeypaflwilh 
1-1 □ Key* And tab, 
r«turn, (-), jjantf(.!i 



m 



UV *'EPROM" 

ERASER 

Model 

DE-4 

$89.95 




Modal S-S2T 



HCHds 4 EPROM'a 
al a titnt 
S32S.OO 



16K MemoiY 
Expansion Kits 

for Apple/TRS-80 

a pea .lilt; ISK 

Sp«iV compwtftT \P I ,^.^0 
CALL FOR VOLUME PRICING 



CORCOM FILTER 

M^ Popular 

■I CORCOM 

^B~'3 1 Filter 

^^^ G nmpa "^ 

Cornpjtitie Lno Co'd Add S3. SO 



Astec RF Modulator 

^^i'^Tf COLOR 
B/W 

P/N 1062 ChHTjiel 3 dr 4 SS.aS 



AMD MODEM 10 

^^^^P/NAM7910 
^PP"*'^ S Volts 



Special ACP Price 



'99* 



64K CMOS 




mr 



6116 3C"5 

SVoH 
SHi>t3[« Supply 
.Assm and Tealnd 



INTEL 



ATIC 
VIS 

Super Fasti 

Super 
Low Powerl 



Part No. !147 $1 .95 ea. 



STEPPER MOTOR 

Operaf« tjy applyina 

12VDC In one diroc- 

^^ EiKjn anrij Ihen revers- 

W I Ing polarity JOT square 

."-/wavBj. U«5 12VCIC. 

. y Clock Wise Rololioo. 

natfid 3 RPM at 4 

P.P.S. with B S c^rrv 

EtepEung HJlglc. 

10forS34.95 




RS232 SIGNAL TESTER 

CO EX RS232 
Line Testar 

0.1/24" 

iCtheir Styles AIk AvaiFatus' 






INTEL CODEC IC 

P?N2910A 
For Digital 

Voice 

*9".. 

fo^ Flher P/hl £dl2A .„ M-9S ««. 



lUUCIi lU 




SURGE 
SUPPRESSOR 



^ "Surgeontcs' 



Power Sentry 

15 ATnps250Vol!s 
trans ifirit suppression 



LOnw Pricfl 



*39'= 



CONNECTORS 



0B2S9 tRS23?] 

DB?&S Fedule 

Hood 

Scl wiFh Hood, Sola 

22/44 S,/T. KIM 

43/S6 S/T, MOT 

$0/ 1 00 S- 1 00 Comotlflf W/W 

50/100 3' 100 ConmecTcr SjT 



».25 

a.7s 

1.25 
7,50 

2es 

650 
4.9S 
395 



PARALLEL ALPHA NDMERIG 
PRINTER 



^^^^^^9P ^ ^ Column Pnnte' pmnts t & nui r»ricaf cpIu mns pf l>; 3 
^^^^■^^^ columns vwhjch hflye math, alpha and other notatKjrs, 
^^^ Each wtwot ftas 1^ poartiofls wim position 12 blsni*;. 

Posilion 1 1 on numerical columns have decin^l point or *. Utiltzea 2 75" 
wl(Je adding machine i{ip$ and a tluBl CoM mk ribbon, tnpui data parallel 
wit hEcLjr bit BCD comparator circuit Lschematicorovideen. Prim ts.l&, 3 lin«$ 
P«r second. Operating voEiaga 2Z-2Q\fOO with lyptcai cycle ttme ol 
340m5. SIzoeVW x3^^H KS^^'Dp. New, $9.95 ea, 3/$27 



1 9^ scoojl 4Q as 



oo 



1«3 BITS 

Km 14 as 



KI73N 34 « 



stie/2oies7.&g 

4>ie-2 IflrS 

4tie-2 B/12 95 



2101 
2T02 

a 11.02-2 

21L02-4 

2Ht 

3ti2 

2114 

£114^2 

2114L-4 

213^1 



3^ 

1,40 
129 
3-49 

I. OS 
3 25 
2 2e} 

6M 



21J7 $$99 

4T4 4e0 

itoi 99 

1103 00 

4027 -4.60 

4044 369 

4050 Am 

oeo 4eo 

409S 399 

4115 1.49 

4200 7.9& 

<»402 100 

5230 460 



■--IH-J-J.lr^i 




ai55S995 
31 &Q »-«5 
6202 20 05 
S20S 200 
8212 2 75 
62U 4.95 
6216 2,75 
S2Z4 2.55 
Q22G 2-95 
6226 3.9S 
^43 050 
B250 14.95 
5251 G50 
S2M 1 1 .OS 
0255 4 50 
6257 9 50 



6259 »95 
6275 tSflS 
6279 0.50 

eeio 4,rs 

6620 5.50 

6621 B50 

6626 ID SO 
6934 1^.05 
6645 22.95 
^647 27 95 
esse S25 
635? 525 

eaeo 10.95 

6662 10.9S 
6675 5 9S 
6BS0 2 49 



S9047 S22 95 

664BS 1995 

46£05 22 95 

6520 61H. 

6522 095 

6530 X 24 95 

6632 17 95 

6&5t 19 05 

leO-RO 6 50 

ZflOA-PIO 950 

zeo-CTC 6 sa 

ZeoA-CTC 9 50 

260-DMA t9.95 

ZflOA-OMA 27.95 

Z60-SIO ?4 05 

2eOA-SlD 29 95 



MOS PROMS 



27e4kSKi6}TS 
3:732(4KxBft.& 
271&Z6lfi,AV 

rM627lO, 5V, 12V 
27Sa, SV. [450nSh 



795 
1795 

3&5 



2Tdfl14SOr,Sl S5?S 
270a|(3£On6l ^2b 

i7DiA sra 

P^SSOJAO 14 50 

IUM5204<0 995 



■iihJJ*]!! 



j9i}-Hi^s^Uff«i van 
niS4to>i5v;iH«r rc» 

ISI^UMllSViUirtf Mt5 
UC IH4T1 D ASCJI VtnM r J -»& 
uCIM4M0U4tiiSiriT4el IJ'SS 
ui:uu7MiAj|:^C()Airf n a 

c7iiDtiiirknrF jaa^ 

i^1-diChiifi»K« »U 

ani'C^DidFlaKrii 4i H 

ITnCO DSJlvpy 4455 



2il4]EHilC^MrJW 

liiCOIiilbWy 

M«Mll3FnqC<DV 

i4oeLi9bi: 

14UL1I1H 

DMXIDlvA 



ipiicai ^n•i1> 

EMCLDQ 995 

lOUIiin^nieiMiUi 4 5B 

UI5G&VCI3 1H 

XFU3» FufHWn C*«llfr S 25 

Tiii«nai^v.i!V) m 

Jl|'r&!l}E«A/l«l!iS'14V1 «K 

AnSD(94t/1UI>l5Vl [K 



TWHr'SHT 
ilCi44n 

4m 

Vni94,1 
ihSttH 

HUitttiM£. 



<» 






LOW PROFIU 
SOCKETS (TIN) 



nLP 



20 pin I. 
22 pin L 



SapinL 
40 pin L 



.1G 



34 



4>1 
.32 



3L WREWRAP 
SOCKETS (GOLD) 



15 pin V 

16 pin V 

20 pin 
32nin 
24 j3ifi 
26 pin 
i40 fKn 



rtWW .55 

n WW fllnl 65 
.75 



WW 
WW 
WW 



],4S 
1.35 



1,DB 
1,35 

1,26 
1.63 



.70 
.61 
99 
123 
I 14 
136 



SUPER IC CLOS 



78HCeK 

7aM00 

7aM.G 

LMlOQAH 

LM300H 

LM301CH 

LM304K 

LM306K 

LM306K 

LM307CN 

LM3CBCH 

LM309K 

LM31CCM 

LM3110/CH 

LM312H 

LM317T 

LM31BCH 

LM319N/H 

1_M330K-XX' 

LM^OTOJX' 

LM320H->O;" 

LM323K 

LM^4N ' 

LM337K 

LM338K 

IM338N 

LM346K-XX' 

Uwi340T-XX* 

LM340H-XX* 

IM344H 

IJM346H 

uttasoK 

LM35aCN 
LM360M 

LM37eN 
LM377N 

L>A3eOCNfl4' 
LM36tN 

LM3B3T 
LM3SQNI 
LW367N 

LM30ON 

NE531V/T 

NE&5SV 

WE5&0N 

NE5S1t 

HE565N/H 

Nf566H/V 

Ne567V/H 

NE592N 

LM702H 

LM700N/H 

LM710H/H 

LH711hVH 

LM735N 

LMr23WH 

LM733WH 

LH739N 

LMTJiChVH 

LM741CH-14 

LH747N/H 

IJWT4ai^H 

LM1310N 
MC133a 
^1C1350 
MCI 356 



74SOOS .38 

74S02 .43 

74300 

74S04 

74S06 

74SOa 

74SO0 

74S10 

74811 

74SIS 

MSZO 

74S22 

74S30 

74532 

74S3S 1 19 

74S40 .46 

74S51 .-t? 

74564 46 

74565 .46 
74S74 60 
74S86 .72 

745112 .72 

745113 .72 

745114 ,72 



t.96 

T,eo 

3 25 



1-75 
1,70 

1.46 

^2S 

1 35 
1 30 
1.25 
4 95 

-OiS 
5.95 
9.95 

.95 

^JS 

125 
1.25 
ISfi 

1,20 
6.60 



3.75 
2. 75 
1.25 
1.7Q 
1.95 
1,25 
1.40 
1.95 
3.75 

.SB 
19.96 

t.75 
1.50 
275 

t.OO 
29 
.75 
30 

1.05 



l.fiO 

1.95 
1.95 
1.75 



LM141JIN 

1-M]45(JCWM 

MC149SM 

M0l4eSN 

U.I1496N 

LM155544 

U^1&2W 

LMIBSQM 

LMlBeSN 

liClllN 

LM2000M 

Uv^dOIN 

LM2917N 

CA»t3T 

CA3018T 

CA3021T 

CA3023T 

CA303ST 

CA303eT 

f;A3046H 

LAWD53N 

CAaoesN 

CA30KM 
CA30SH 
LMJOQON 
CA3060T 
CA30B1N 
CU0fl2H 
CA3093N 
0KXI66H 
CUOBOH 
CA30B6hl 
CA30e7N 
CA^iaOT 
C't314aT 
CA314fiW 
CA3iaiT 
CA319CW 
CA3410N 
MC3423N 
MC3460H 
5a3524H 
CA3900N 
LU3000N 
LM3905N 

Luasow 

UUI3014N 

LM3015M 

LU3916H 

RC4131M 

RC413eW 

fiC4151W 

HC4194TK 

RO4l051>; 

ULPCOOI 

ULH2IXO 

ShF7S450hi 

SW75451M 

SN75452N 

SN75453NI 

SNT6464M 

SNrS40lN 

SN75492M 

SH75403W 

SN75404M 

a494CN 

TL496CP 



90 
00 
^ 
1.50 
S5 
,05 
3.10 
1.75 
90 
2-50 
2,05 
2.19 
199 
3.40 
2,99 
2:75 
1.29 
1.20 
1.40 
3.19 
3.10 
4.05 
1.49 
129 
1.60 
1.60 



2.00 
3.40 
1-99 
1.30 
1.19 
2.49 
1.10 
T05 
59 
1.49 
3 95 
3.05 
3.39 
.59 

1 to 

06 
3.75 
3.95 

3.72 
2.95 
1.16 
370 
4,95 
5l40 
1.25 
1.56 



4-20 
1.65 



.42 



42 



74S124 
743133 
74S134 
74S135 
74S130 
743136 
74S139 
7451 40 
743151 
74S153 
74E1S7 
74S15& 
743160 
74S174 
7>S1 75 
7*5166 
743194 
74E195 
743106 
743240 
74S241 
74S242 
74S243 



74S244 S2.99 

74S251 1 35 

74S2S3 135 

74S257 129 

T4&2Sa 1.29 

74S2eO 75 

743260 2.?9 

74S287 2 99 

74S2S6 2.55 

743373 3.10 

743374 310 
74S3B7 2.75 

745471 7.05 

745472 7j05 

743473 795 

743474 9.85 
74S47S 005 
743370 575 
743671 5.75 
74S572 6 OS 
743573 6vOS 
743040 2.80 
743941 2 90 



DIP 
SWITCHES 



SPosilion 3 90 

4Po3lllcn 1.13 

5 PoSilion 1 .20 

OPwilton 1,35 




7Powtkw1 SI .39 

6 Patiimn 1 49 

OPoBiiiofi 1.65 

lOPosJlwi 1.69 



MUFFIN® FAN 




Th6 deoendable. low 
cosMar^e^l seUinsjlan 
*.0f cQmiTi«rc>.ilcoolirka 
appiioations. 

• 1 0Sedrn trafl air dalnvy 

• 4.68^5^ k1.50"d*«j] 
Wffis^l- 17 or. 

SPECIAL PURCHASE 



EOUT SPECIALS 



74LS377 2/1 ,W 

74L3241 271.99 

6259 e.OS 

6&51 fVM 205 

LM733CN 3/1,99 

LM323K 395 



6571 A S6.95 

Eta 2«52 395 

62S3 6 95 

275S EPHOM 2.95 

1602 £.95 

ZSOA CPtJ 4,95 

0522 6.95 

6502 CPU 5.95 



60eOACPU 
2102 RAM 
4050 RAM 
2732 
UPD410 
UPCMtl 



S2.05 
,75 
1.40 
695 
2.06 
2,06 



270aEPRDM 6^9.95 
2114 &14.50 



502? CRT $9*5 

2001 305 

B03S 3.0S 

MMS32CI 5.00 

9139 RAM 1.00 

eMM4402 1 99 

10416 4.95 

e7[50A/O 2/1605 



TOLL FREE 

800-854^8230 

TUX 

910-595-1565 



J2 



7402 
7403 

7404 22 

7405 23 

7406 JS 



7407 

74oe 

7400 
7410 
7411 
7412 
7413 
7414 
7416 
7417 
7420 
7421 
7422 
7423 
7425 
7426 
7427 
7429 
7430 
7432 
7437 
7438 
7439 
7440 
7441 
7442 
7443 
7444 
7445 
7446 
7447 
7446 
7450 
7451 
7463 
7454 
7450 
7460 
7470 
7472 
7473 
7474 



74LS00S JS 

74L301 .25 

74LS02 S6 

74U303 28 

74LSQ4 35 

74L30fi ^ 

74L30G 28 

74L30e 35 

74LS10 .28 

74L3n 30 

74LS12 33 

74LS13 .47 

74LS14 05 

74L315 33 

74L3OT 28 

74LS21 3i 

74LSa2 33 

74LS26 33 

74La27 J3 

74U326 .33 

741,330 28 

74L&Q J3 

74LS33. .55 

74US37 45 

74LS3& 39 

74LS40 J» 

74LS42 .79 

74U34? 70 

74LS48 .95 

74LS51 .28 

74L354 20 

741555 20 
74LS73 
74L374 
74{.S75 
74LS78 
74LS78 

74L3e3A .70 
74LSa5 1 10 

74L3B8 45 

74LS90 .57 

74t302 75 

74L303 75 

74L5S8 BS 

74LSS5 06 

74L3107 45 

74L3ira .45 

74LS112 43 



4000 S 35 

4001 35 

4002 35 

4006 1-05 

4007 25 

4008 1 39 
4000 .45 

4010 .45 

4011 35 

4012 .25 

4013 .45 

4014 1-30 

4015 1.15 

4016 5d 

4017 1.19 
4016 .60 

4019 .45 

4020 1.10 

4021 1.10 

4022 1.15 

4023 .29 

4024 ,75 
4035 ,25 
4027 .65 

«ss es 

4030 T20 
40C» ,45 

4031 3.25 

4032 2.1S 

4034 3 25 

4035 95 



i.es 



,75 



74161 » ee ^ 

74182 SQ 
74163 

74164 .87 

74165 67 

74166 120 
74167 
74170 

74172 4,75 

74173 ,70' 
74174 
74175 
74176 
74177 
74170 134 
T4180 
74161 
74162 75 
74134 2-25 

74185 2 25 

74186 9.95 
74166 3.00 
74100 1,15 
74191 
74192 
74103 
74194 
74195 
74106 
74107 
74108 1.39 

74199 1 .39 
74221 
74251 
74273 1 .06 
74276 1.60 
74270 

74283 1 .40 

74284 3.90 
74265 3.90 

74200 1.25 
74298 
74365 
74366 .65 
7436? 
74388 
742BO 1.45 
74303 1.90 
74*90 1.80 



74L3n35 ,43 74L3245S2.20 

74L31I4 ,43 74LS247 1.10 

74LS122 .55 74L324B 1 10 

74L-S123 1-19 74L3240 1.19 

741.3124 135 74L3aSl 1.40 

74LS125 .80 74LS253 1-40 

74<.S12Q .52 74LS2S7 ^ 

74LS132 .79 7413256 



7475 S .38 

7476 ,34 
7470 4 60 
7460 40 
74B2 95 
7483 55 
7435 
74S6 
7480 
7490 
7491 
7402 
7493 

7494 69 

7495 .65 
7406 .69 
7497 2-90 
74100 290 
74107 -32 
74109 
74116 
74121 
74122 
74123 
74125 
74 126 
74123 
74132 
74136 
74139 
74141 

74142 295 

74143 2-95 

74144 205 
74145 
74147 
74146 
74150 
74151 
74152 
74153 
74154 
74155 
74156 
74157 
74158 

74159 Z49 

74160 .56 



6i 
35 
1.75 
39 
57 
-43 



1.95 



-96 
.70 



1.95 
1.20 
1-00 



67 

1.10 
.78 
.76 

-60 
1 65 



65 



65 



1.10 



74tS136 
74LS138 
74LS139 
74LS14S 



74LS259 2-SH 

74LS2eO -6S 

.65 741.S261 2.40 
25 74LS266 



74LS146 1,49 744.5273 1.75 

74LS151 .79 7^.3275 4 40 

74LS153 .79 74LS27e 

74LS154 1-70 741^283 

744.3155 1.19 744.S290 

74LS156 .09 74LS2S5 00 

74LS167 .55 744.3295 1 to 

74L3158 ,75 7415296 1.1G 

74LSt60 1.05 74LS324 1.75 

74LS161 1.15 74L3347 1.^ 

74L3162 1 05 741.3348 1 85 



7413163 

74LSt64 

74LS16S 60 

74L3106 248 74L5365 

74LS168 1 15 74LS36fl 

74LSie9 1 15 74LS367 

7413170 1-00 74L336S 

74LS173 

74LS174 

74LS175 60 



.OS 744.3352 1 19 

19 741.S3S3 I.IO 

744.3363 1.40 



74LS373 188 
74L3374 1.68 
74L3375 



.42 74L3161 2 20 744.5377 1.95 



7413190 

74LStfl1 
74L31fi2 
74LS103 
74L5184 
74L319S 
74LS106 
74LSt97 



r44.33a5 1.B5 
.15 744,3366 

06 744.3390 1.93 

98 744.5383 1.S5 

.15 744.S395 1.70 

-05 74J.3300 235 

,80 74LS424 2.^ 

744.5668 1.75 



74L3221 1 15 744.S670 2-29 

74L3240 160 eiLSOS 1 60 

741.3242 199 811.598 1.80 

74LS243 1.89 S1LS97 1.69 

74LS244 1.40 61 L306 169 
VOLUME PfllCtU 

L»l^ TBUFm 



4037 SI .95 
4040 1.20 



4042 
40^ 
4044 
4048 



65 
1.75 

4047 1.25 

4048 .99 

4049 .45 

4050 .60 

4051 1 10 



4055 395 

4056 2.85 

4059 0-25 

4060 1.39 



4069 S2.66 

4003 *9 

4004 2*5 
40Q8 229 

4005 2.25 
14406 T29S 

14409 12.95 

14410 12.96 
14412 12.95 
14415 6 05 
14419 4.95 
4501 



4088 

4070 
4071 
4072 

4073 
4075 



.75 
.49 



.35 

4076 1.29 
4077 



4078 
4061 
4082 
4085 1.95 



35 
35 



4502 
4W3 
4505 
4S06 
450? 
4506 
4510 
45t( 
4512 
4515 
4516 
4516 
4520 
4555 
4555 
4566 



155 



05 

3.75 
1.19 
1,10 
1.30 
2.7S 
1.45 
1.30 
125 
4.95 
99 
2.25 



80CS5 1.50 
OOCVT 1.25 



Mill Order f.O. Bm 11329 IreliE. »9»I3 

Ritill: 13IDE£.Edli|ir,S>iitilln>Clia7T0S 
|7U) 5S1-UU 

U2 m. Trimlile, Sig Jgie, CA 9St31 
(4aai 9411-7019 



; MO Caihut'j C*i«ii BinhWirt t^fwn\r\ 

£hocySi,llo*Jwwkir4)rpfeC4i**r>g liwlud* DlWVI 
Lit:*^l» kmf c^BiM cud 'j. ^«- AWEJ(, CB »ftfi JN- 
Hrvki* tlkmr^ Add ^% ihipfHn] i hartdhng v ti SO. 
nrtiiel1*™r It flr»i1*T AflO lO> lor Isrti^in W«lf» or 
US P>r»l PmL litieludaTAUprvnfl fbjmtMr NOCO0« 
PftCailUbtiQlQChar»(i'Withi«]1nBriCfl S^«lt*rni 
■ub^Kt IQ pDer uM. Wa w»*rii4 [hi9riahiiaiFDt4li1ij1q 



s. 

in 

s 



CIRCLE 80 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



131 



ELECTRONIC KITS 
FROM HAL-TRONIX 

2304 MHZ DOWN CONVERTERS. TUNES IN ON 
CHANNELS 2 TO 7 ON YOUR OWN HOME TV. HAS 
FREQUENCr RANGE FROM 2000 MHZ TO 2500 
MHZ. EASY TO CONSTRUCT AND COMES COM- 
PLETE WITH ALL PARTS INCLUDING A DIE-CAST 
ALUM CASE AND COAX FITTINGS. REQUIRE A 
VARIABLE POWER SUPLY AND ANTENNA (Antenna 
can be a dish ,type or coHee can lype depending on the 
signal strength m your area.) 
2304 MOD 1 (Basic Kill $19.95 

2304 MOD 2 (Baste Rfe-amp) $2S.95 

|l«f ai30 £ liriiriQ9> 

2304 MOD 3 (Hi-Gam Pre-amp) S39.95 

llrMMudGS aiBC k fillingtl 

POWER SUPPLY FOR EITHER MODEL ABOVE IS 
AVAILABLE. COMES COMPLETE WITH ALL PARTS, 
CASE, TRANSFORMER. ANTENNA SWITCH AND 
CONNECTORS (Kit) S24.95 

Assembled S34.95 

Slotted Microwave Antenna Fof Aboue 
Downverters S39.95 

PREAMPLIFIERS 
HAL PA-19— 1.S mhz to 150 mhi. I9db gain operates 
on S to 18 volls at 10m a. Complete unit $8.95. 
HAL PA-1.4— 3 mhi to 1 .4 gtiz. 10 to 12 dtj.gain op- 
erates on e to 18 volts at 1 ma Complete unit SI 2.96. 
(Tlie above units are ideal for receivers, cotjnl&rs. etc.) 

16 LINE TOUCH TONE DECODE KIT WITH P.C. 

BOARD AND PARTS S69.9S 

12 LINE TOUCH TONE DECODER KIT WITH P.C. 

BOARD AND PARTS S39.95 

16 LINE ENCODER KIT. COMPLETE WITH CASE, 

PAD AND COMPONENTS S39.9S 

12 LINE ENCODER KIT. (COMPLETE WITH CASE. 
PAD AND COMPONENTS. S29.96 

Complete Sets of P.C. Boards Available For Uni(»rn 
Robot Pfojecl anil Heart-A-Matic Project. 
MANY. MANY OTHER KITS AVAILABLE 

■m« Htnl* i^ivcr th»L rMhhnuliw ukl riw w«4w 
■UL-THQHD; f*AHM. U m*w fef ^mm^ 1 1tl 3K ITU. 

:sif Hal-Tronix 
iKv ^•^- ^°* ^^^^ 

■wi, tHMu t MswMtt Souihgoi*, Ml 4A1$9 

utIZjIh 

,u.h-.^ fl"Eie« Cren EH.MWr^l. It iMI^rtD P44TPAID tXCtWT 

lurrka luLxTVU '" ODEM ttS* 1m*m iHMtLrAlE INClUDEXfiamoM 

IHFQKMATIQM., A, j,jKi FOfl HAfitnug *t,D WAi. .,r. r.i APiiii, 

CIRCLE 43 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



/ 



U BUY QUALITY ELECTRONIC & 
*' INDUSTRIAL COMPONENTS 

From the Source! 

TMS MONTHS SPBCtALSt 

POWER SUPPLY mODULf 

MIOE RANGE INPUT 3-T£RmiNAL 
SWITCHING REGULATOH 
_ eOSCHERT 3T12AP 

Input GG pottage +10V Co 60V 

foltag' 
to 33' 




OulpLit DC volEags adjuatment 
range -4 sv |o 30V. Output 
current 0-12A. Dimensions: 5"L 
.<"W- I'^'H jeo«iEACH 



DC ithtt laguitnr 

POWER 1BS-6 

Input DC ¥oi!ag& 40V. 
■output OC voltage *J 5V 
to *6.5V. inpul'Outpot 
mn ditt. •♦ tVDC. 
Dimensions 2«" - 2^" " 1tt"H 

13** EACH 



15951 

DC rower meiv 

POWER-ONE 
_HN5-9/0VP_ 

Input tl5^J3Q VAC 
47-440 Hz Output. 
+S VOC at 9A. Oimen- 
«rons 6"W « 7-L " 3'.i" 

19« EACH 



IIHI FIII RIIB 118 vac SO/M Hz 

IMPCDAKCE PROTECTED. 



HOWARD 4«<" Sq. > 
IMC 4Vi- Sq. ■ 

ETBI 3%" S<1. 



1V11SCFMyi(*N«(.... S.WH. 

1Vi"11S CFM Nr* 10.»S H. 

xf ShCFMNtw B.WM. 



3M/i*0 V«c M/M Hl-IWPeOANCE PBOTECTED 



IMC 
IMC 



tV Sq. 
10" O.D. 



' 1ft"11S CFM New 9.95 ta 

' 3V,"230 CFM New 19.9S ea 



1M2 STE SVtWHIlM 
GOLOI TV PUTS 

Re mole Conlfol AmpEifier 
w/lnfrgred Pre Amp Si.95/S«t 




mEGHIHICiL 
TVIIMEI 

Channels 2-M. Sylvania 
part No. 54-43617 
10.95 M. 



1 



GftSSEnEUTAIEGOIDER 

\-7fBtPS 4-TRACK, 2-CHAW^EL 
DC Salurattn^ Bias. 550 Figx 
_ reversals per inch, per channel 

WTth modilicaiion^ compalible OQ95 
%viih pejfiona! computers £^1 

ELECTROHIGS 
GO. 

SO O Atlams Blvd.. Farmlngdalg. NY. 11 73 5 
SlV694-4100 • Toll Free 800/645-9060 J 




CIRCLE 68 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



DON'T 
BLAME 
THE 
SOFTWARE 

Power Line Spikes and Hash often cause 
memory loss or erratic operation. Often 
floppies, printer & processor interact! 

OUR patented ISOLATORS eliminate 
equipment interaction AND curb damag- 
ing Power Line Spikes, Surges and Hash. 

Filtered 3-prong sockets and Integral 

Spike Suppression. 125 VAC, 15 Amp, 

1875 W Total - 1 KW per socket. 

ISO-1 ISOLATOR, 3 Filtered Sockets; 
1000 Amp 8/20 usee Spike Suf)- 
pressor $76.95 

ISO-4 ISOLATOR. 6 Filtered Sockets; 
1000 Amp 6^20 usee Spike Sup- 
pressor $128.95 

ISO-3 SUPER-ISOUTOR. 3 DUAL fil- 
tered Sockets; 2000 Amp 8/20 usee 
Spike Suppressor $115,95 

ISO-7 SUPER-ISOLATOR. 5 DUAL fil- 
tered Sockets; 2000 Amp 8/20 usee 
Spike Suppresor $186.95 

Mester-Ctrargfl, Visa. Amflrican Express 
TOLL FREE ORDER DESK 1-800-2254a7B 

lexcapt AK. HI. MA, PR & Canada) 



Electronic Specialists, Inc. 

in Soulfi Mam Stieet Nalicii. MA 01760 
Technical & Non 800 1 617 6S5 1532 



CIRCLE 48 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



JAVANCO 

1-800-251-5555 TOLL FREE ORDER LINE 

Q 



w 
o 

z 
o 
cc 

I- 
o 



Q 
< 

CL 

132 



160 2.id Ave.S. Nashville, Tn. 37201 



PSCC-LOS POLYSTTRSKE KIT 
iCta pet. KJiiMl U«d POLV 
CAFS.jvit^rcH uf^l and 
voLcd^vi. . thai* ir* cti« 
cap< which duriy pr«f«r 
bacAUJi« ^tt JtJblXCCr 
lod Law fallurt rtc* 
18 TPYES of (i) PCS, 
lOfl POLYSYtllEHE CAPS 
a^ain pe<:k4d Ln i re 
m«abl.e,}iijie:<4 cop boa. 




EP-lOOl 515,00 
AK AUTOMATIC PROGRAM- 
MER DESIGNED FOR HEAT- 
ING SYSTEMS. 
IT OVERRIVES THE THER- 
MOSTAT DURING KITE HRS 
TO SAVE 55 OFF YOUR 
WINTER FUEL BILL, COMES 
WITH INSTRUCTIONS 
EP-lOOl FUEL SAVER 



AC- 1004 

Shielded cable, very flexible. 7 ft. 
lengths. 1/8" diameter., i^oven coppec 
braid shield with polyethylene cats and 
black pvc i>uter insulation, prestrlpped 
ends and solid tinned copper core wire. 

PRICE 
1 seven foot length 90c 
1 bundle ( 40 ) seven foot lengths $20.00 



I 



CRY-l 

crt-1 

CRY- 3 

CRIt-* 
ZtLl-i 

CRY-S 

cm- 10 

CRY- 11 
CRY- II 
CRY-13 
CRY- 14 
CKY-16 
CRY-IS 
CRY- 15 
CHY-IO 



i.lSOli IfH^ 
;.i9;0 KHZ 

S.71S0 lai 

14,6 HHZ 
31.9 HHZ 
!.;2S0 tlHZ 
e.liOS HNZ 

31.700 mz 

i.l904 HHl! 
5.7350 MHZ 

(. 1704 mz 
3.2333 MKI 
3.3000 MHZ 
), 175 -IHZ 
5. 139e HSZ 
5i.«)37SO HKZ 






f! 



ira ttAVI HAD KimEFtOtJS CALLS 
roR CttYSTALS . 50HE ARE PC 
l£AD SOKE AttE LOHC LEAD 
SOME. SHALL CASE. SOME REG. 

rCtIR CHOICE $1.90 EACH 



CRY- 21 
CRY-22 
CRY- 13 
CRY -24 
CRY-2S 
CRY-2« 
CEY-I7 
CRY- 28 
CRY- 2? 
CRT- 30 
CRY- 3! 
CRY- 32 
CRY- 3 3 
CRT-34 



5.1645S3 
5.147917 

5.13U50 

5.156250 

3«n.467 

3« 5(3 . COQ 

3*95.833 

3554.167 

3779.167 

3.775.00 

3737.500 

3733.333 

3775,00 

5.0686 



KHZ 
MHZ 
KHZ 
HHZ 

KHZ KHZ 
niZ KHZ 
KHZ KHZ 
KHZ ItHZ 
KHZ ItHZ 
MHZ 

ItHZ IlHZ 
ItHZ HHZ 
ItHZ KHZ 
HHZ 



CUt-lO ^ (101 ABJUSIWILE CA. HPE RT-IF COILS. UJICE AM SMALL TYPES 

n'.ii fi«=- — ^ ■ 



n 



CLI-20 (20) Of EH HIHDIIK; SLUG TtllfEB COILS 



ft 



CUt-ZS <Z5) ASSORTED FIJTO IHDtiCTOR CHOKES ATO COllS. AIIAL ARD 
PRIRTED CIRCUIT TtPES. —^ 
S1-70 FKC. 



-IS ' lis 



OCK-IS " 111) I.OH0 LEAI, CERAMIC DISC CAPACITORS. HAUt) PICKED FOR THE 
BEST VALUES IK STOCE. 

90c PtC. 



DCK-21 mi aiCH tJUALITY 'OLYSTTREITE CAPACITMS^ THE|E CUt REPLACE 

MICA FILM, PAPER AHO CERAMIC TtPES IS MOST CASES. 

■il no ff<? 




DCK-iS ^.-rfsTHICH VOl.TAOE CERAMIC DISC CATACTTORS. IE* TO 7. J (». 
^-^ S2.90 PIC. 



^. 



« 



T^- inn' I finni PBTHTEn CI RCU IT 1 SCAPS . PICtED FROM STOCK TO ASSURE 
DCS-lOO fJ=''>„J^J^sU5°;j;T OFTAIUES FOR EVERYDAY IS^. 
S2.5D TKC. 




Btt-io'uo) miivERSAL sichal diodes such tf :""■';*?■ '""■'"^" 

Aim ECO- 177. PACltED IB A REHSEASLI PI^STIC CASE. 
50. lis Tin- 



f^inr^i CAM r\^r efncf^ ifcn-rtmi*Tlrtlil r-Aon 



lamsaij the first name in Counters ! 



9 DIGITS 600 MHz $129 i,„^^ 

WIRED 




SPECIFLCATIONS: 



AC ! AC MUprtr 

BPi riTjCMipafh *m: 

A4li?ur<'CKirtTr 

OV ] , Uttrfy p*ir*f Ovcp 

EntnUJ IW* t«K wpuT 



The CT'SO i> the mosi veniililc fc«lur« picked counter aviiliblc for leis 
ihui 53OO.O0[ AdvuiceddcAi^ fesium include thrtt itltcuhk £Ate times, 
nine digitis gate indicttcr ind < unique displiiy hotd function which holds the 
displtyed coMOtt iifter the input sigruJ ii removed Alto, a iOmH^TCXOtime 
b«xe ij used which enables easy zero beat calibnlion checks against WWV. 
Optionally; an intcmul nicadbittery pack,extemal time base input aadMicro- 
power hifh stability cf^staJ oven lime bue arc avtilable. The CT-90^ 
perfoTniBitce you can count on! 



Range; 
ScTisiiiviLy: 

Resolution: 



Display: 
Tune bau: 



20 Hi to 600 MHi 

Less Ehan 10 MV to 150 MHi 

Lesj than 50 MV to 500 MHi 

0.1 Hz (10 MHzrUfte) 

1.0 Hi (60 MHz ranges 

10.0 Hz {600 MHz ran^c) 

9 di^ts 0,4" LED 

Standard- LO.ODO mHz, LO ppcn 20-40'' C 

Optional Micfo-powcr oven^.l ppm 20-40'C 

3-15 VACfii 250 ma 




7 DIGITS 525 MHz $99f jj^^^ 

The CT-70 breaks the price barrier on lab quality frequency oountert 
Deluxe features such as; three frequency ranges- each with pre- ampUficatlon, 
dual electable gate times, and ^te activity Indication make measurements a 
snap. The wide frequency range enables you to accurately measure sifiinals 
Drom audio thru UHF with I.O f>P™ accuracy- Lhat''s.DODl%! The CT-70 is 
the answer to mil your measurement ne«b» in the lield. lab or htm shact 



SPFCIFICATIONS 


Range 


20 Hz to 525 MHz 


5eniitivity: 


L«s Oiir 50 MV to ISO MHi 




Lms Ulllil 1 50 MV to SOO MHi 


ResoEuiion: 


1.0 Hi (J MHiringE) 




ID.O Hz (50 MHz nnge) 




100,0 Hi (30O MHi nrgc) 


Display: 


7 digits 0.4" LED 


Timfi bisK 


I.OppmTCX0 20-40'C 


Powtt: 


12 VAC® 250 ml 



PRICES; 

CT-70 wired, 1 year warranty 

CT-70 Kit, 90 diypiiuwmr- 

rtnty 

AC-1 AC adapter 

BP-I Nicid pack -f AC 

adapter/charger 



S99.95 

84.95 
3,95 

12,95 



7 DIGITS 500 MHz $7955 

WIRED 




PRICES: 

MINI- 100 wind, 1 yeai 

warranty *'K-95 

AC- Z Ac adapter for MINI- 

100 3.9S 

BP-Z Niczd pack and AC 

adapter/ charger 12,95 



Here^s a handy, general purpose coojnter thaE provides most counter 
ftinctlons at an unbelievable prioc. The MlNl-100 doesn't have the Rilt 
(reqtuncy range or input impedance qualities found in higher price nnilj^ but 
for basic RF signal measurement^ it can^t i^e beat! Accurate measurements 
canbemadefrttmlMHzallthe way up to 5 00 MHz with excellent seniitivity 
throughout the range, and the two gate times let you select the resolution 
degired Add the nicad pack option and the MINI-100 majees an ideal addidon 
to your tool box for "itvthc-lieltf' freqt^ncy checks and repairs 



SPECIFICATIONS: 



Range: 

Sensitivity: 

Resolution: 

Display: 
Time base: 
Power 



1 MHz to SOO MHi 
Leas than 25 MV 
100 Hz [slow gale) 
1 .0 KHi (fast gate) 
7 digits, 0.4" LED 
:.0 ppns 20-40° C 
5 VDC ® 200 ma 



8 DIGITS 600 MHz $159^,„„^ 




SPECIFICATIONS 




Resolution; 

Diaplay: 

TinebatE 

Power- 



20 Hz to 600 MHz TheCT-50 i3aver5atilclabbenchcouater1hatwillmeasureupto600 MHz 

Leis than 25 mv to 1 50 MHz injih g jigji precision. Ajid, one of its best features is the Receive Frequency 
^''J^^i wtf.".'."^ "^"^ Adapter, which turns the CT-JO into a digital readout for any receiver. -tTie 
adapter is easily programmed for any receiver and a simple connection to the 
receiver's VFO is all that is required for use. Adding the receiver adapter in no 
way limits the operadon of the CT,-50. the adapter can be conveniently 
twitched on or oIH The CT-50. a counter that can work double. duty 



1.0 Hz (60 MHz range] 
10.0 Hz (GDO MHi range) 
3 digits 0.4" LED 
2.0 ppm 20-40''C 
110 VAC or 12 VDC 



PRlCESj 




CT-50 wired, 1 year warrant 


SI 59.95 


CT-50 Kit. 90 day parti 




warranty 


119.95 


RA'l, receiver adapter kit 


14.95 


RA^ L wired and [H^o>-pFO£rain- 




med (»jid copy of receiver 




schematic) 


29.95 




DIGITAL MULTIMETER $99 fiRED 

The DM '700 offers profetiional qualiry performance n a hobbyist pricr- 
FeacuTH include; 26 differerti rongei and 5 funciLons, ill imn^ed in a 
convervicnlT casv Eo w; format- Me»*urein«iti iic diiptayed on a large 3V5 
diflE, ^ inch LED readout wnh lutomatic decimal placemcni. automatit: 
polirirVs Dverranef Indication and DverloidpcDCcction up to 12S0volisonat] 
ran(i^, making it vimallv goof-proaf! The DM^VOO looin great, a handsosne, 
jcE bEacIci iHj^fi^ AfiS catc With convenient retractable tilt b^l itiakc& k an 
ideal addition to anv f hop. 



fRlCES: 




DM700 wiiiid, 1 yearwamnty 


S99.95 


DM-700 Kit. 90 day pans 




warranty 


79.95 


AC-1. AC adaptor 


3.95 


BP-3, Nicad pack -1-AC 




adapter/ charger 


19.95 


MP-1, Probe kit 


2.95 



SPECIFICATIONS; 


DC/ AC volts 


lOOuVlo 1 KV, 5 ctngei 


DO AC 




current 


0. 1 uA to 2.0 Ampi, 5 ranges 


Resistance 


0,1 dhms to 20 Megohms, 6 ranges 


Input 




impedance: 


10 Megohms, DC/ AC volts 


Accuracy; 


O.l%haoe DC volts 


Power: 


4 'C celU 



AUDIO SCALER 

For high resolution audio measurements, multiplies 
UPin frequency. 

• Great for PL tones 

• Multiplies by 10 or 100 

• 0.01 Hi resolution; 

S29.95 Kit S39.95 Wired 



ACCESSORIES 

Telescopic whip antenna - BNC plug. S 7,95 

HiEJ! impedance probe, light loading 15.55 

Low pas! probe, for audio measurements 1 5.95 

Direct probe;, generat purpose usage ,,.,,*,,>,,, 12.95 

Till bait, for CT 70, 90, MINI-100 3.95 

Color burst calibration unit, calibrates counter 

against color TV signal 14,95 



COUNTER PREAMP 

For measuring extremely weak ttpiali 1from 10 to 1,000 
MH:. Small sire, power^ by plugtransformer'induded. 

• Flat 25 db ^n 

• BNC Connectors 

• Great for sniHing RF with pick-up Loop 

SS4.95 Kit S44.95 Wired 



13 TIStll, tllEISff LlhS, in. 

2575 BAIRD RD. ■ PENFIELD, NY 14526 



PHONE ORDERS 

CALI. 716-586-3950 



insur(aru*tovmapi>TnijniblS10 Ovaruaipdd t SS. COO 4dd 



> 

-< 

CO 
CD 
U 



CIRCLE 79 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



133 



64K DYNAMIC 
200 NS 



[2KX8 STATIC 

' 200 NS 



STATIC RAMS 



2101 


25e x4 


<4S0ns) 




1.95 


5101 


25S X 4 


(45Dns; 


(cmos) 


3.9S 


2102-1 


1D24 1 1 


(4 sons] 




.69 


2102L-4 


1Q24X 1 


(4SDns] 


(LP) 


.39 


2102L-2 


1024 X 1 


(250ns] 


(LP) 


1.49 


2111 


256x4 


(450ns) 




2.49 


2112 


256x4 


(450nsi 




2,99 


2114 


1 Q24 I 4 


(45Dns) 




a/3.55 


2114L-4 


1024 X 4 


(450ns) 


(LP) 


3/12.95 


21141-3 


1024 I 4 


{3DDns] 


(LP) 


8/13,45 


2114L-2 


1024 x4 


(200ns) 


(LP) 


8/13.95 


2147 


4036 X 1 


(SSns) 




4.95 


TMS4044-4 


4096 X 1 


(450ns) 




3.49 


TMS4044-3 


4096 X 1 


(3D(lns) 




3,99 


TMS4044-2 


4036 X 1 


(200ns) 




4.49 


MK4118 


1024 xS 


(251>ns) 




9,95 


TMM20 16-200 


2043 X 3 


(20ans] 




4.15 


TMM201S-15D 


204S X 6 


(150ns) 




4,95 


TMM2016.100 


2043 X S 


(100ns) 




6.15 


HMG116-II 


2043 X 8 


(200ns) 


(ctnos) 


4.75 


HM6116-3 


204S X S 


(ISOnsj 


(cmos) 


4.95 


HM6116-2 


2043 X S 


(ISOns) 


(cmos) 


S.95 


HM6116LP-4 


2043 X S 


(2D0ns) 


(cmos)(LP) 


5.95 


HME116LP-3 


2043 X 3 


(ISOns) 


(c:fnos)(LP) 


6.95 


HM6116LP-2 


2046 I 6 


(120ns) 


(cmosKLP) 


10.96 


Z-6132 


4036 X 3 


(30ans) 


(Qstst) 


34.95 


LP Low Powef 


□ 


stol Quasi-Slal 


C 



DYNAMIC RAMS 




TMS4D27 4096 X 1 


(250 ns) 


1.99 


UPQ411 4036x1 


(300ns| 


3.00 


MMS280 4096x1 


(300ns| 


3 00 


MK410B 6132x1 


(200ns) 


1.95 


MMS29B 3132 x 1 


(2SDns) 


1.85 


4116-300 16364x1 


(300ns) 


9/11.75 


4116-250 16334 X 1 


(2S0ns) 


6/11.95 


4116-200 16384 II 


(200ns) 


6/12.95 


4116-150 16384x1 


(150ns) 


6/14.35 


4116-120 16384 i 1 


(120ns) 


6/29.95 


2113 16384 I 1 


(ISOns) (5v) 


4.95 


4164-200 65536 i 1 


(200ns) (5v) 


&.9S 


4164-150 65536x1 


(150ns) (5v) 


6.95 


. 5V single 5 voti supply 





EPROMS 



1702 

2703 

2758 
I 2716 
I 2716-1 

TMS2S16 

TMS2716 

TMS2532 
I 2732 

2732-250 
I 2732-200 

2764 

2764-250 

2764-200 
I THS2564 

MC66T64 



256 X 
1024 X 
1024 I 
2048 I 
2048 I 

2048 X 

2049 I 
4098 X 
4096 X 
4096 X 
4096 X 
ai92x 
6192 X 
6192 K 
6132 X 
8132 X 



8 (lus) 

8 (4Sans) 

a (450ns) (5v) 

5 (450ns) (Sv) 
E (350ns) (5v) 
8 (450ns) (Sv) 
8 (450ns) 

6 (450ns) (5») 
3 (450ns) (5v) 
8 (250ns) (5») 
8 (200ns) (5v) 
3 (450ns) (5v) 
8 <2S0ns) (5v) 
8 (20Ons) (5v) 
8 (450ns) (5x) 
8 (4S0ns) (5»)(24 pin) 

single 5 VCkll Supply 



4.50 I 

3.9S 

5.35 

3,9S 

5.35 

5.50 I 

7.35 

5.95 

4.95 

6.95 

11.95 

3,95 

14.95 

24.95 

17,95 

33.95 



EPROM ERASERS 







Capacily 


In1«nsl(y 






Timer 


Chip 


(uW/Cm>) 




PE-14 




6 


5,200 


83.00 


PE-14T 


X 


6 


5,200 


119.00 


PE-24T 


X 


9 


6,700 


175.00 


PL-265T 


X 


20 


6,700 


255.00 


PR-125T 


X 


16 


15,000 


349.00 


PR-320 


X 


32 


15,000 


595-00 



Z80-CPU 

zao-CTC 

Z60-DABT 

Z60-DMA 

Z60-PIO 

ZSO-SIO/O 

Z60-SIO/1 

ZSD-SIO/2 

Z80-SIO/9 

4.0 Mhz 
zeoA-cpu 

Z30A-CTC 

Z60A-DART 

Z60A-DMA 

Z80A-P!O 

Z80A-SIO/0 

Z60A-SIO/1 

Z80A-SIO/2 

ZeOA-SIO/9 

6,0 Mhz 

ZaOB-CPU 11.95 I 

Z8DB-CTC 13.35 

ZaOB-PIO 13.95 

Z80B-DART 19.35 



CRYSTALS 



3,95 
4.49 
10.95 I 
14.9S 

4.49 I 
16.95 
16.95 
16.95 
16.35 

4.95 
4.95 
11.35 
16,95 
4.95 
16.9S 
1G.9S 
1E.3S 
16.9S 



32.769 ktll 
1,0 mhi 
1.8432 
2,0 

2.037152 
2.4576 
3.2768 
3.S7953S 
4.0 
5,0 

5.0688 
5.166 
5.7143 
6.0 
6.144 
6.5536 

a.o 

10.T3B635 

14.31818 

15.0 

16 

17,430 

18,0 

18,432 

20,0 

22,1184 

32,0 



1.35 

4,35 

4,95 

3,95 

3.95 I 

3.95 

3.95 

3,95 

3.95 

3,35 I 

3,95 

3,95 

3,95 

3.35 

3.35 

3.95 I 

3.95 

3.95 

3.95 

3.95 

3.95 

3,95 

3,95 

3,95 

3.35 

3,95 I 

3.95 J 



CRT 




CONTROLLERS 1 


6845 


14.95 


68B45 


35.35 


HD465a5SP 


15,35 


6847 


12,25 


MC1372 


6,35 


68047 


24,95 


8275 


29,35 


7220 


99,95 


CRT5027 


39,35 


CRT5037 


49,95 


TMS9318A 


39,35 


DP6350 


49,95 



8000 




8035 


5.95 


8039 


6.95 


IKS -6060 


17.95 


lNS-8073 


24,95 


6060 


3.95 


8065 


5.95 


8085 A-2 


11,95 


8066 


29.95 


8037 


CALL 


6069 


39.95 


8039 


39.35 


6155 


6.95 


8155-2 


7.95 


8156 


6,95 


8185 


29,95 


a 185-2 


39,95 


8741 


33,95 


8748 


24,95 


8755 


24.95 



74LS00 



8200 




8202 


24,96 


6203 


39.35 


6205 


3,50 


6212 


1.80 


8214 


3,85 


6216 


1.75 


3224 


2.25 


6226 


1.80 


3223 


3,49 


6231 


call 


8237 


19,35 


823 7-E 


21.95 


8238 


4,43 


8243 


4.45 


S250 


10.35 


825 1 


4.49 


8253 


8.35 


8253-5 


7.95 


S255 


4.43 


8255-5 


5.25 


8257 


7.35 


8257-5 


8.95 


8259 


6.90 


8259-5 


7.50 


8271 


39.95 


8272 


39.95 


8275 


29.95 


8279 


8.95 


8273-5 


10,00 


8262 


6.50 


8283 


6 50 


8264 


5.50 


8286 


6 50 


8267 


6.50 


8288 


25,00 


8289 


49.95 



r 


DISC 




CONTROLLERS 


1771 




16,95 


1791 




24,35 


1733 




26,95 


1735 




49,35 


1797 




43,95 


2731 




54,35 


2793 




54.95 


2795 




53,35 


2797 




53.95 


6843 




34,95 


8272 




33.96 


UPD765 


39.95 


1691 




17.96 


2143 




ia.95 



68000 
6800 
6802 
6808 
8809E 
6809 
6810 
6820 
E821 
6828 
8840 
6643 
6844 
6645 
684T 
6650 
6852 
6660 
6862 
687S 
6880 
6883 
68047 
66488 
6800 



59.35 

3.9S 

7.95 

13.90 

13.95 

11.95 

2,96 

4,35 

3,25 

14.95 

12,95 

34,95 

26,35 

14.95 

11,35 

3,25 

5,75 

9.95 

11,35 

6,95 

2.25 

22,95 

24.95 

19.95 

1HHZ 



68800 




10.95 


68B02 




22.25 


68 BOO E 




29.95 


68B03 




23.95 


6BB10 




6,95 


66621 




6.35 


68B45 




19,95 


63B50 




5.35 


68B00 


2 MHZ 




6500 




1 


MHZ 




6502 




4.95 


6504 




6.35 


6505 




8,95 


6507 




3.35 


6520 




4,35 


6522 




7.95 


6532 




9,95 


6545 




22,50 


6551 




11.85 


2 MHZ 




6502 A 




6.95 


6522A 




9.96 


6532A 




11.95 


654 5 A 




27.95 


6551 A 




11,35 



AVS-IOU 


6,95 


AY5-1013 


3,95 


AW-IOIS 


6,35 


PT1472 


3.95 


TR1$02 


3,95 


2350 


9.95 


2851 


6.96 


TMS6011 


5.95 


IM6402 


7,96 


IM6403 


8.35 


INS6250 


10.35 


GENERATORS 


8!T-HATE 



MC14411 

BR1941 

4T02 

COM5016 

C0Mei16 

HH5307 



11.95 
11.96 
12,95 
16,95 
10.35 
10,95 



KEYBOARD 
CHIPS 

A f 5-2376 11.35 

iAVS-3600 11,95. 



[CONNECTORS 

HS232 MALE 2.50 
1 nS232 FEMALE 3.25 

BS232 HOOQ 1.26 
Is-IOOST 3.95 J 



FUNCTION 

MC4024 3.95 

LM566 1.49 

XR2206 3.75 

18036 3.95, 



74LSO0 
74LS01 
74LS02 
74LS03 
74LS04 
74LS06 
741.S08 
74LS09 
T4LS10 
74LS11 
741.S12 
741.S13 
74LS14 
74LS15 
74LS20 
74LS21 
74LS22 
74LS26 
74LS27 
74LS28 
74LS30 
741532 
74LS33 
74LS37 
74LS38 
74LS40 
74LS42 
74LS47 
74LS48 
741. S49 
74LS51 
74LSS4 
T4LS55 
74LS$3 
74LS73 
74LS74 
74LS75 
74LS76 
74LSr8 
74LS83 
74LS85 
74LSa6 
74LS90 
74LS31 
74LS32 
74LS33 
74LS95 
74LS96 
74 LSI 07 
74 LSI 09 
74LS112 
74LS113 
74LS114 
74 LSI 22 
74 LSI 23 
74LS124 
74 LSI 25 
74 LSI 26 
74 LSI 32 
74 LSI 33 
74 LSI 36 
74 LSI 37 
74LS138 
74 LSI 33 
74LS14S 
74LS147 
74LS148 
74LS151 
74LS153 
74LS154 
74 LSI 55 
74LS156 
74LS15r 
74LS15S 
74LS160 
74LS151 
74LS162 
74LS163 
74LS164 
T4LS165 
74LS166 
74LS16a 
74LS169 
, 74LS170 



.24 
.25 
,25 
.25 
,24 
.25 
,28 
.29 
.25 
,35 
.35 
,45 
.59 
,35 
.25 
.29 
.25 
.29 
.29 
.35 
.25 
.23 
.65 
.35 
.35 
.25 
.49 
.75 
,75 
.75 
.25 
.29 
,29 
1.25 
,39 
.35 
39 
.33 
.43 
.60 
.63 
,33 
.55 
,89 
,55 
,55 
,75 
,89 
,39 
,39 
,39 
,39 
,39 
,45 
,79 
2,90 
.49 
.49 
.59 
,59 
,39 
,99 
.55 
.56 
1.20 
2.49 
1.35 
,55 
,55 
1,90 
,69 
,69 
,65 
,59 
.69 
,65 
.69 
,65 
.69 
,95 
1,95 
1,75 
1.75 
1.43 



74 LSI 73 

74LS174 

r4LS175 

74LS161 

74LS163 

74t.S130 

74LS131 

74LS132 

74LS193 

74LS134 

74 LSI 95 

74 LSI 96 

74 LSI 97 

74LS221 

74LS240 

r4LS241 

741,8242 

74LS243 

74LS244 

74LS245 

74LS247 

74LS24S 

74LS249 

74LS251 

74LS253 

74LS2S7 

74LS25a 

74LS2S9 

74LS260 

74LS266 

74LS273 

74LS27S 

74LS273 

74LS280 

74LS283 

74LS290 

74LS293 

74LS295 

74LS298 

74LS299 

74LS323 

74LS324 

74LS352 

74LS353 

74LS363 

74t_S364 

74LS365 

74LS366 

74LS367 

74LS368 

74LS373 

74LS374 

74LS377 

74LS378 

74LS379 

74LS385 

74LS386 

74LS390 

74LS393 

74LS39S 

74LS399 

74LS424 

74LS447 

74LS490 

74LS624 

74LS640 

74LS645 

74LS66B 

74LS669 

74LS670 

74LS674 

74LSE82 

74LS683 

74LS684 

74LS665 

74LS68a 

74LS683 

74LS783 

81LS95 

81LS96 

81LS97 

81LS98 

25LS2521 

2SLS2569 



,5: 

,Sl 

2,11 

8,3! 

,8! 

,s: 

,7! 

,7: 

.61 
.6! 
,7i 
.71 
.B> 
.3i 
.9! 
.9! 
.9! 
.9! 

1.4! 
.7! 
.9! 
.9< 
.5! 
.5i 
.5! 
,5! 

2,7: 
,5! 

,5: 

1.4! 
3.3: 

.4! 
1.9! 

,6! 

.8! 

,a< 

.9E 

.8! 
1.7; 
3.5[ 
1.7! 
1,2! 
1,2! 
1.3! 
1.9! 

.4! 

.4! 



1,3! 

i.n 

1.3 J 
1.3C 

,4J 
1,1E 
1,1< 
1.1£ 
1,4! 
2.3£ 

,33 
1,3; 
3.9S 
2,2C 
2,2C 
1,65 
1,8S 
1,45 
9,66 
3.2C 

3.at 

3.2C 
3,2C 
2.4C 
3.2C 
24.9E 
1.4; 
1.45 
1,4S 
1.45 
29C 
4.25 



JDR Microdevices 

1224 S, Bascom Avenue 

San Jose, CA 95128 

800-538-5000 • 800-662-6279 (CA) 

(408) 995-5430 • Telex 171-110 

. 1963 JDR MICRODEVICES. INC. 



VISIT OUR RETAIL STORE 
H0UR5: M-W-F, 9-5 T-Th., 9-9 Sat. 1 1 
PtMAse USE YOUfi customeu nvmber whfm ohderi, 

TERMS: For tlilpplng Include $Z lor UPS Ground or S3 for UPS 8 
Label Air. Uvmi over 5 pounds require addJIIonal tapping char 
Fcr^lgn ordcr». include lultkclefil amount tor ihipplrtg. There it & 
mtnlmum order Bay Area and Loi Angelei Counttpaadd g'l^^ S 
Tax. Qih^r CalHofnls r«tidflnts add G«o Sulet Tsx. We reipfvp 
light lo lubilUule manufacturer. Noi reipomlble for typograph 
ttrort. Pjices are lubject to change without nolicc- W« will mate, 
beii my compelKora price provided II ^k not betow ourcoM, 



CIRCLE 75 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



2114 4soMs8/$995 21ia2s..s8/S1095 



7400 



74132 
74136 
74141 
74142 
74143 
74145 
74147 
7414S 
74150 
741S1 
74152 
T4153 
74154 
74 155 
7*156 
74157 
74159 
74160 
74161 
74162 
74163 
74164 
74165 
74166 
74567 
74170 
74172 
74173 
74174 
74175 
74176 
74177 
74178 
74179 
74180 
74181 
74182 
74184 
74185 
74190 
74191 
74192 
74193 
74194 
74195 
74196 
74197 
74190 
74199 
74221 
74246 
74247 
74248 
74249 
74251 
74259 
74265 
74273 
74276 
74279 
74283 
74284 
74285 
74290 
74293 
74298 
74351 
74S65 
74366 
74367 
74368 
74376 
74390 
74393 
74425 
74426 
74490 



CLOCK 

CIRCUITS 

5314 4.95 

5369 3.95 

537S 4.95 

59187 3.95 

5B174 11.35 

M5832 6.95 . 



LINEAR 



LM301 

LM301H 

LM307 

LM308 

LM308H 

LM309H 

LM309K 

LM310 

LM311 

LM311H 

LM312H 

LM317K 

LM317T 

LM318 

LM318H 

LM319H 

LM319 

LM320(se«; 

LM3a2 

LM323K 

LM324 

LM329 

LM331 

LM334 

LM335 

LM338 

LM337K 

LW337T 

LM33aK 

LM339 



RCA 



LM340 (K 

LM348 

LM350K 

1-M350T 

LM358 

LM359 

LM376 

LM377 

LM37e 

LM379 

LM380 

LM3SDN-I 

LM3ai 

LM382 

LM383 

LM384 

LM386 

LM387 

LM389 

LM39a 

LM392 

LM394H 

LM399H 

NES31 

NE55S 

NESse 

NE55B 

NE5S1 

NE564 

LMS85 



H TO-5 CAN 



INTERSIL 1 


ICLTIOS 


9,50 


ICL7106 


9.95 


ICLri07 


12.95 


ICL7660 


2.95 


ICLS038 


3.95 


ICM7207A 


5.59 


ICM720B 


15.95 



9000 

9318 

9334 

9368 

9401 

9601 
i 9802 
L96S02 



LMsee 

LM587 

NE570 

NE571 

NE592 

LM709 

LM710 

LM711 

LM723 

LM723H 

LM733 

LM741 

LM741N-1. 

LH741H 

LM747 

LM74B 

LM1014 

LM13D3 

LM1310 

MC1330 

MCI 349 

MC1350 

MC1358 

MC1372 

LH1414 

LM1458 

LM14ES 

LM14e9 

LM149G 

LM15SBH 



LM1B0D 

LM1S12 

LM1S3a 

LM1S71 

LM1S72 

L Ml 877 

LM1S89 

LM1896 

ULN2003 

LM2877 

LM2878 

LM29aO 

1.M2901 

LM390a 

LM3905 

LM3g09 

LM3911 

LM3914 

LM3915 

LM3916 

MC4024 

MC4044 

RC4136 

RC41S1 

LM4250 

LM45ao 

HC4S5B 

LM130BCI 

LM 13600 

LM13700 



CA3323 
CA 3039 
CA 3046 
CA3059 
CA 3060 
CA 3065 
CA 3080 
CA 3081 



CA 3082 
CA 3083 
CA 3086 
CA 3089 
CA3098 
CA3130 
CA3140 
CA3146 



CA31S0 1.19 



Tl 



TL494 
TL496 
TL497 
75107 
75110 
75150 
75154 
75188 
75 189 



TL071 
TL072 
TL074 
TLOSl 
TL!I82 
TL0S3 



753G5 
75450 
7S4S1 
75452 
7S4S3 
754S4 
75491 
75492 
75493 
.89 



Bl FET 



TL!1S4 
LF347 
LF351 
LF353 
LF3SS 
LF356 
1.40 





74S00 




74S00 


.32 


74S163 


1.95 


74S02 


.35 


74S16S 


3.95 


74S03 


.35 


74S1S9 


3.95 


74S04 


.35 


74S174 


.95 


74S0S 


.35 


74S175 


.95 


74S08 


.35 


748181 


3.95 


74S09 


.40 


74S182 


2.95 


74S1D 


.35 


74S188 


1,95 


74S11 


.35 


74S1S9 


S.9S 


74S15 


.35 


74S194 


1,49 


74S20 


.35 


74S195 


1.49 


74S22 


.35 


74S196 


1,49 


74S3D 


.35 


748197 


1.49 


74S32 


.40 


74S201 


6.95 


74S37 


.93 


74S225 


7.95 


74S39 


.85 


74S240 


2.20 


74S40 


.35 


74S241 


2.20 


74SS1 


.35 


74S244 


2.20 


74S64 


.40 


74S251 


.95 


74S6S 
74S74 


.40 
.50 


74S2S3 
74S257 


.95 

.95 


74S85 


1.99 


74S258 


.95 


74S86 


.50 


74S260 


.79 


74S112 


.50 


74S274 


19.95 


74S113 
74S114 


.50 
.55 


74S275 
74S290 


19.95 
1.95 


74S124 


1.75 


745287 


1.90 


74S132 


1.24 


74S299 


1.90 


74S133 


.45 


74S2S9 


6.89 


74S134 


.SO 


74S301 


6.95 


74S135 


.89 


74S373 


2.45 


74 SI 38 


.85 


74S374 


2.4S 


74S139 


.85 


7AS381 


7.95 


74S140 


.55 


74S387 


1.95 


74 SI 51 


.95 


74S412 


198 


74S1S3 


.95 


74S471 


4.95 


74S157 


.95 


74S472 


4.96 


74S1S8 


.95 


74S474 


4.95 


74S161 


1.95 


74S482 


15.25 


74S1S2 


1.95 


74S570 


2^95 






T4S571 


295^ 



INTERFACE 



VOLTAGE 



8T26 
8T28 
ST 95 


1.59 
1.B9 
.89 


REGULATORS 




8T95 


.B9 


7805 T 


.75 


790ST 


.85 


8T97 


.99 


7a08T 


.75 


7908T 


.85 


8T9B 


.99 


7812T 


.75 


791 2T 


,85 


DM8131 
DPB304 


2.95 
2.29 


7815T 
7«24T 


.75 
.75 


791 5T 
7924T 


.85 
.85 


DS8835 


1.99 


780SK 


1.39 


r905K 


1,49 


DSB836 


99 


781 2K 


1.39 


7912K 


1.49 


MISC. 




781SK 


1.39 


7915K 


1,49 


ULN2003 


2.49 


7824 K 


1.39 


7924f( 


1.49 


3242 


7.95 


7BL05 


,69 


79L0S 


.79 


3341 


4.95 


78L12 


.69 


79L12 


.79 


MC3470 


4,95 


78L15 


,69 


79L15 


.79 


MC348D 

11C90 

95H90 


9.00 
13.95 
7.95 


78H05K 


9.95 


LM323K 


4. 95 


78H12K 


9.95 


UA78S40 


1,95 


2513-001 UP 


9.95 


T 


TO-220 


K ^ TO-3 




2513-002 LOW 


9.95, 


, 


L 


TO-92 





IF VOU CAN FIND A PRICE LOWER ELSEWHERE. 



ilallkl. , il"i'l> il" 3I' llii 3311! 1: 3'iii Fal 



PRICEIISEE TERMS BELOWl 

* GomDuter managBd Inuantory - uirtuaiiu 
no DacK orders! 

* vanrcomDetittusDiiGesi 

* FTiendiv Slam 

* Fast sarulCB - most orders stiioDBd uiimin 
24 hoursi 



MasterCard 



V/SA 





CMOS 




4000 


,29 


4527 


1.95 


4001 


.25 


4528 


1.19 


4002 


.25 


4531 


,95 


40O6 


.89 


4532 


1.95 


4007 


.29 


453B 


1.95 


400B 


.95 


4539 


1,95 


4009 


.39 


4541 


2.84 


4010 


.45 


4543 


1,19 


4011 


.25 


4553 


5.79 


4012 


.25 


4555 


.95 


4013 


,38 


4556 


.95 


4014 


.79 


4581 


1,95 


4015 


,39 


4582 


1.95 


4016 


.39 


4584 


.75 


4017 


,69 


4585 


.75 


4018 


.79 


4702 


12,95 


4019 


,39 


74C00 


.35 


4020 


.75 


74C02 


.35 


4021 


,79 


74C04 


,35 


4022 


.79 


74C0B 


.35 


4023 


,29 


74C10 


.35 


4024 


.65 


74C14 


.59 


4025 


.29 


74C20 


,35 


4026 


1.65 


74C30 


.35 


4027 


,45 


74C32 


,39 


4028 


.69 


74C42 


1.29 


4029 


,79 


74C4a 


1.99 


1030 


.39 


74C73 


.65 


4034 


1,95 


74C74 


,65 


4035 


.95 


74C76 


.80 


4040 


.75 


74 CSS 


1,95 


4041 


.75 


74C85 


1.95 


4042 


.69 


74Ca6 


,39 


4043 


.95 


74C89 


4.50 


4044 


,79 


74C90 


1,19 


4046 


.95 


74C93 


1.75 


4047 


.95 


74C95 


,99 


4049 


35 


74C107 


.89 


4050 


.35 


74C150 


5,75 


4051 


.79 


74C151 


2.25 


4053 


.79 


74C154 


3,25 


4060 


.99 


74C157 


1.75 


4066 


.39 


74C160 


1.19 


4068 


.39 


74C181 


1.19 


4069 


.29 


74C162 


1,19 


4070 


.35 


74Cie3 


1.19 


4071 


.29 


74C164 


1,39 


4072 


.29 


74C165 


2,00 


4073 


,29 


74C173 


.79 


4075 


.29 


74C174 


1.19 


4076 


,79 


74C175 


1.19 


4078 


.29 


74 CI 92 


1.49 


4081 


.29 


74C193 


1.49 


4082 


.29 


74C195 


1,39 


4085 


.95 


74C200 


5.75 


4086 


.95 
,49 


74C221 
74C373 


1,75 


4093 


2,45 


4093 


2.49 


74C374 


2.45 


4099 


1.95 
12.95 


74C901 
74C902 


.39 


14409 


.95 


14410 


12,95 


74C903 


.95 


14411 


11.95 


74C905 


10.95 


14412 


12.95 


74C906 


.95 


14419 


7.95 


74C907 


1.00 


14433 


4.18 


74C908 


2.00 


4502 


.95 


74C909 


2.75 


4503 


.65 


r4C910 


9.95 


450B 


1.95 


74C911 


8.95 


4510 


.85 


74C912 


9.95 


4511 


.85 


74C914 


1.95 


4512 


.85 


74C91S 


1.19 


4514 


1.25 


74G918 


2.7S 


4515 


1.79 


74C920 


17.95 


4516 


1.55 


74C921 


15.95 


4518 


.99 


74C922 


4.49 


4519 


.39 


74C923 


4.9S 


4520 


.79 


74C926 


5,95 


4522 


1.25 


74C926 


7.95 


4526 


1.25 


74C928 


7.95 


L 




74C929 


19.95 



EXAR 

XFI 2206 
XR 2207 
XFI 2208 
XR2211 
XR 2240 



DATA ACQUISITION 

AOCOaQQ tS.55 DACOaOS 

ADC0804 3.49 DAC1020 

AOCOaOS 4.43 DACt022 

ADC0817 9.95 MCl408Le 

^ OACOODO 4.95 MC1408Le 



SOUND 


CHIPS 


76477 


3,95 


76489 


8,95 


AY3-8910 


12,95 


AY3-8912 


12.95 


MC3340 


1.49. 



ORDER TOLL FREE 600-538-5000 



ALL MERCHANDISE 100% GUARANTEED 



800-662-6278 

(CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS) 



CALL US FOR VOLUME QUOTES 



1983 JDR MlCnODEVICeS. INC, 



CIRCLE 75 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



2732 



32K EPROM 



276a 



64K EPROM 



CAPACITORS 

TANTALUM DISC 





GV 


10V 


1SV 


20V 


2SV 


35V 


50V 


.22u( 












.40 




.27 












.40 




.33 












.40 


45 


.47 








,35 






.50 


.68 












.45 


.50 


1 






.40 


,40 


.45 


.45 




1.5 








,45 




,50 


.60 


t.S 














.75 


2.2 




.35 


,40 


,45 




.65 


.85 


17 




.40 


.45 








.90 


3.3 




.45 


.50 


.55 


.60 


.65 


.90 


3.9 




.45 












47 


.45 


.55 




.ED 


.65 


.85 


.90 


6.0 






,60 










E.a 






,70 




.75 






a.2 














1,00 


10 


.55 


.05 


,90 


.as 


.90 


1.00 




12 


.65 




.»S 


.90 








16 


.75 


.85 


.90 










18 






1,25 










22 




1.00 


1.3S 










27 






2.25 










39 




1.50 












47 


1.3S 














5fi 


1.75 














100 




3.25 












S70 


3,7S 














, 
















^^^H 


w 





OPTO- 




ISOLATORS 


4N2G 


1,00 


MCA-7 


1.50 


4N27 


1,10 


MCA-25S 


1.76 


4N2e 


.69 


IL-1 


1.25 


4N33 


1.75 


ILA-30 


1.25 


4N35 


1,25 


ILO-74 


2.75 


4N37 


1,25 


K11C5 


1.25 


MCT-2 


1.00 


T(L-111 


1,00 


MCT-6 


1 50 


TIL-113 


1.75 






DIODES 




1N751 


5.1 voM zener 


.25 


1N759 


12.0 »0H 


lener 


,25 


1N414S 


(1N914) 


swilchmg 2£ 


.■■1,00 


1N4004 


400PtV rEclitiQi 1C 


,■1,00 


KBP02 


200PIV 1 


.5amp bridge 


.45 


KBP04 


403PIV t.59mp bridge 


.55 



MUFFIN FANS ^ 


NEW UN- 


■USED 


4.68 Square 


14.95 


3,125 Square 


14.95 



SWITCHES 

SPOT mini-loggle 
DPOT mini-toggle 
SPDT push-bullon 



lOpI 

22 

25 

27 

33 

47 

55 

68 

82 

100 

220 

330 



50V 

50V 
50V 
50V 
5DV 
50 V 
SOV 

sav 
sov 

EOV 
50V 

SOV 



.06 
,05 
.05 
.05 
,05 
,05 
,05 
,05 
.05 
,05 
OS 
,05 



4 70 
560 
650 
820 

.001 ul 

.0015 

,0022 
005 

.01 

.02 

.05 

.1 

,1 



5DV 
50V 
50V 
SOV 
50V 
SOV 
SOV 



05 
.05 
.OS 
.OS 
.05 
.05 
.05 



MONOLITHIC 



nlul-rnono SOV 



.la .47uf-morto SOV 



ELECTROLYTIC 



RADIAL 

.47u( SOV 



2.2 

4.7 

10 

47 

100 

220 

470 

2200 



25 V 
35V 
SOV 
SOV 
35V 
16V 
35V 
25V 
16V 



.15 

,15 
.15 
,18 

IB 
,20 
.30 

60 



COMPUTER 
GRADE 

26 OOOuP 30V 3.95 



lul 

4,7 

10 

10 

22 

47 

100 

100 

150 

220 

330 

500 

1000 

1500 

6000 



AJtrAL 
50V 
16V 
16V 
SOV 
16V 
SOV 
1SV 
35 V 
25V 
25V 
16V 
16V 
16V 
16V 
16V 



.14 
.14 
-14 
.16 
.14 
.20 
.20 
,25 
.25 
,30 
,40 
.42 
.60 
.70 
.85 , 



WIREWRAP CARDS 

FR-4 Epoxy Glass Laminate 
With Gold-P[ated Contact Fingers 

S-100 BUSS 

I P100-1 Bare — No Foil Pads 15.95 

P100-2 Horizontal BUSS 22.95 

P100-3 Vertical BUSS 22.95 

I P100-4 Single Foil Pads Per Hole, 23.95 

APPLE 

P500-1 Bare — No Foii Pads 15.95 

P500-3 Horizontai BUSS 22.95 

P500-4 Single Foil Pads Per Hole. . . . . 23.95 

IBM 

IBM-PR BUSS Lines + Pads 55.00 

GENERAL PURPOSE 

22/44 PIN { .156" SPACING) 

P441-3 Vertical BUSS, 4.5" X 6" 13.95 

P442-3 Vertical BUSS. 4.5" x 9" 14.95 

36/72 PIN ( .1" SPACING) 

P721-3 Vertical BUSS, 4.5" x 6" 13.95 

L P722-3 Vertical BUSS, 4.S" x 9" 14.95 



IF VOU CAN FIND A PRICE LOUfER ELSEWHE 



Hal k1 Jiini.T, iiTTr^n]|||,'|M jiii'i'i^.'kti; 



PRICE! (SEE TERMS BELOUIl 



TRANSISTORS 



IC SOCKETS 



2N918 


.50 


MPS3706 


.15 


MPS918 


.25 


2N3772 


1.85 


2N2102 


.50 


2N3903 


,25 


2N2218 


,50 


2 N 39 04 


.10 


2N2218A 


.50 


2N3906 


.10 


2N2219 


,50 


2N4122 


,25 


2N2219A 


,50 


ZN4123 


,25 


2N2222 


.25 


2M4249 


,25 


PN2222 


,10 


2M4304 


.75 


MPS2369 


.25 


2N4401 


.25 


2N24S4 


.25 


2N4402 


.25 


2N2905 


.50 


2N4403 


,25 


2 N 2907 


.25 


2 N 4857 


1.00 


PN2907 


.125 


PN4918 


.25 


2N3055 


.79 


2^5D86 


,25 


305 5T 


.69 


PNS129 


,25 


2N3393 


.30 


PNS139 


.25 


2N3414 


.25 


2N5209 


,25 


2N3S53 


.40 


2N5028 


,35 


2M3565 


.40 


2N6043 


1.75 


PN3S6S 


,25 


2 N 6045 


1,75 


MPS3638 


,25 


MPS-A05 


,25 


MPS364a 


,25 


MPS-A06 


,25 


PN3643 


.25 


MPS-AS5 


.25 


PN3644 


,25 


TtP29 


,65 


MPS3704 


.15 


TIP31 


.75 


k^ _. ^ 




TIP32 


,79 



Spin ST 

14 pin ST 

15 pin ST 
18 pin ST 
20 pin ST 
22 pin ST 
24 pin ST 
28 pin ST 

I 40 pin ST 
64 pin ST 



1-99 
,13 
,15 
,17 
.20 
,29 
.30 
.30 
.40 
.49 

4.25 



100 

,11 

,12 
,00 
,18 
.27 
,27 
.27 
,32 
.39 
call 



MasterCard 




LED LAMPS 

1-99 100- up 
Jumbo 

Pad .10 ,09 

J umbo 

Green .16 ,15 
Jumlso 

Yellaw .18 



ST = SOLDEBTAIL 
8 pin WW .59 .49 



LED DISPLAYS 



14 pin WW 

16 pin WW 

I 18 pin WW 

I 20 pin WW 

1 22 pin WW 

: 24 pin WW 

28 pin WW 

40 pin WW 



.69 
.49 
,99 
1,09 
1,39 
1,49 
1,69 
1.99 



.52 
.49 
.90 
.98 
1.28 
1.35 
1,49 
1.80 



HP 5082-7760 
MAN 72 
MAN 74 
FNO-357 (359) 
FND-500 (503) 
FKDSOT (510) 



,8" 

,3" 
.3" 
.375' 

-S" 
.5" 



cc 

CA 
CC 
CC 
CC 
CA 



1.29 
.99 
,99 
1,25 
1,49 
1.49 



WW - WIREWRAP 

ISplnZIF 6.75 call 

I 24 pin Z\f 9,95 call 

' 28 pin Z\f 10.95 call 

ZIP = TEXTOOL 

(Zfiro InaartlDn Force) 



HEAT-SINKS 



DIP 




SWITCHES 1 


4 POSITION 


.85 


5 POSITION 


,90 


6 POSITION 


.90 


7 POSITION 


.95 


8 POSITION 


.95 

4 



JDR Microdevices 

1224 S. Bascom Avenue 

San Jose, CA 95128 

800-538-5000 • 800-662-6279 (CA) 

(408) 995-5430 • Telex 171-110 

r 19S3 JOR MICRODEVICES. INC. 



BYPASS CAPS 

.01 UF DISC 100/6.00 

.1 UF DISC 100/8.00 

.1 UF MONOLITHIC 100/15.00 



RESISTORS 

V. WATT 5% CARBON FILM ALL 

STANDARD VALUES 

FROM 1 OHM TO 10 MEG OHM 

SO PCS. SAME VALUE ,025 

100PCS. SAME VALUE ,02 

1000 PCS, SAME VALUE ,015 



VISIT OUR RETAIL STORE 

HOURS: M-W-F. 9^5 T-Th., 9-9 Sat. 11-3 

PLEASE USE YOUft CUSTOmSR NUMBER WHEN OftDERtNG 
TERMS: For ihlpping Inctudv £2 (or UPS Ground or S3 lor UPS Blue 
LftHl Air. Iltmt ovtr S pound! require adidlllDnAl thlpp^ng chargef. 
Fonign ordcfin include iufflcl«nt amount for thJppJng. There J»a $10 
minimum order Say Area and Lo» Angeloi CounHes add 6v/(, Salei 
T». Other Cahfornta r»tdi?nta add €^o Saiea Tax, Wo rea^ne the 
right to aub»tllute manulaclurer. Nor responsible lor lypogriphkal 
vrrori. Pricei ate subject lo ctiHnge''wlihau1 nottce. We win match or 
beat any competllor'a price provided it la not below our coat. 



CIRCLE 75 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



16K EPROM 



TmS2532 



32K EPROM 



MICROCOMPUTER 
ARDWARE HANDBOOK 

FROM ELCOMP — $14.95 

r 800 pages of manufacturers data 

ets on most commonly used IC's. 

udes: 

TL — 74/74LSand74F 

MOS 

oliage Regulators 

lemory — RAM. ROM, EPROM 

iPU's — 6800, 6500, Z80, 8080, 

085, 6086/8 

1PU support &. interface — 6800. 

500, Z80, 8200, etc. 



BEST SELLING 
BOOKS 

OSBORNE/MC GRAW-HILL 

Bple II User's Guide 16.95 

RT Controllers Handbook 9.S5 

]000 Afsembly Language 

Programming ............... 16.99 

BASIC User Guide 15.00 

SYBEX 

our First Computer ....,..-,... fi.95 

ha CP'M Handbook 14.95 

he PASCAL Handbook 18.95 

licroprocessor Interfacing 

Techniques ,,.,...,........ 17.95 



TRANSFORMERS 



FRAME STYLE 

Znmp 
4arnp 
Samp 
2amp 



SVAC 
SVAC CT 
BVAC CT 
6VAC CT 
iVAC CT 



PLUG CASE STYLE 

/AC 250ma 

/AC SOOms 

/AC lamp S.95 

/AC 2anip 5.95 

DC ADAPATER 

9, 12 VOC HEaclabFe wilb universal adapter 

B.95 

^TE: Please include sutllcient amount tor 
ipping on above Mejiii- 



DISK DRIVES 

TANDON 

TM100-1 5'V(FORIBM)Sa/DO 229.00 
TM 100-2 5S- (FOR IBM) DS/DD 295.00 

SHUGART 

SA 40 OL 5M" (40 TRACK) SS/DD 1 99.95 
SA 400 61" (35 TRACK) SS/DD 189.95 

SIEMENS 
FD100-8 8 SS/DD „ „ ^ I 

(801 REPLACEMENT) 259.00 | 

PERTEC 

FD-200 5 r SS/DD 179.95 ' 

FD-250 5. Ds/DD 199.95 

MPI 

MP-52 S'A" (FOR IBM) OS/DD 295.00 

NOTE: Please include sufflcleni amount lor 
shipping on above itemt. 

CABINETS FOR 5Va" 

DISK DRIVES 
CABINET #1 «29.95 

DIMENSIONS 8% x S^^it x S'^e" 
COLOR MATCHES APPLE 
FITS STANDARD 5%" DRIVES, 
INGL SHUGART 
INCLUDES MOUNTING 
HARDWARE AND FEET 

CABINET #2 *79.00 

COMPLETE WITH POWER 
SUPPLY, SWITCH, LINE 
CORD, FUSE & STANDARD 
POWER CONNECTOR 
DIMENSIONS: 1 1 '/i x 5^4 x 3'^6" 
+5V@1 AMP, +12V{® 1.5AMP| 
FITS STANDARD 5'A" DRIVES 
PLEASE SPECIFY 
GRAY OR TAN 

NOTE: Please inclucte sufltciHnl amount Tor 
I shipping on abcxvo ilttms. 



JDR SPRING SPECIALS 

SA400 M 89.95 

* 35 TRACKS 

•k REPEAT OF A SELLOUT 

* LIMITED SUPPLY (AGAIN) 

* MODIFY FOR USE IN APPLE (EXPERIENCED 
TECHNICIANS) 

* USE WITH CABINET #1 TO MAKE A BEAUTIFUL 
APPLE COMPATIBLE DRIVE 

MODIFICATION INSTRUCTIONS $1.00 
34 PIN EDGE CARD CONNECTOR MATES TO RIBRON CABLE $3.2:5 



MEMORY SALE 



2114-t60NS(TM S4045) 8/9,95 

2114 250NS (TMS404S) 8/1 0.95 

21 02L-4 Lcyw powa^ 430ns .55 ea. 



100 FOR .99 ea. 

100 FOR 1.99 ea. 
too FOR .49 ea. 



4164 200NS 
HM6116-4 200NS 
^MM20^$2aa^)s 
2732 460NS 
TMS2532 450N5 
2764 ■(SONS 



Z80A-CPU 4MHZ 
8080 2 MHZ 

8085 3MHZ 

8086 SMHz 

6800 iMMZ 

68000 3MHZ 



COMPONENTS 

LM148e or LM1489 ,69 ea 7805T or 781 2T 
16 PIN LOW PROFILE ST IC SOCKETS 
16 PIN TOOLED WIRE WRAP 10 SOCKETS 



.75 ea. 
100/8.00 

,49 EA. 



SPRING SPECIALS ARg GOOD ONLY UNTIL MAY 31. 1983 



POWER SUPPLY 
MODEL 2 S3935 

MOUNTED ON PC BOARD 
MANUFACTURED BY CONVER 

+5 VOLT 4 AMP 
+12 VOLT 1 AMP 

NOTE: Pleaie Include tuMlcl^nl amount for 
.shipping on above ilonii. 



connectors] 


RS232 MALE 


2.50 


RS232 FEMALE 


3.26 


I1S232 FEMALE 




RIGHT ANGLE S.25 | 


flS232 HOOD 


1.25 


S-IOO ST 


3,95 


S-100 WW 


4.95 


44 pin ST 


2.95 


4* pin WW 


4.95 


72 pin ST 


6.95 


72 pin WW 


7.95 



RIBBON CABLE 



D-SUBMINIATURE 



CONTACTS 



SINGLE COLOR 



r 



10' 



COLOR CODED 



r 



10' 



7.30 
11.00 
11.60 
14.50 
16.80 
22.00 



DESCRIPTIOrvJ 


SOLDER 


RIGHT ANGLE 
SOLDER 


RIBBON CABLE 


HOODS 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


BLACK 


GREY 


ORDER BY 


DBxxP 


DBxkS 


DBxiPn 


DBkxSR 


IDBxxP 


IDBxxS 


HOOD-B 


HOOD 


CONTACTS 9 
15 
25 
37 
50 


2,08 
2.69 
2-50 

4.80 
6.06 


2.66 
3.63 
3.25 
7.11 
9.24 


1.65 
2.20 
3.00 
4.83 


2.18 
3.03 
4.42 
6.19 


3.37 
4.70 
6.23 
9.22 


3.69 

5.13 

6.84 

10.08 


1.25 


1.60 
1.60 
1.25 
2.95 
3,50 



For order instructions see "IDC Connectors" below. 



IDC CONNECTORS 



DESCRIPTION 


SOLDER HEADER 


RIGHT ANGLE 
SOLDER HEADER 


WW HEADER 


RIGHT ANGLE 
WW HEADER 


RIBBON 
HEADER SOCKET 


RIBBON 
HEADER 


RIBBON 
EDGE CARD 


ORDER BY 


IDHxxS 


IDHxxSR 


IDHxiW 


IDHxxWR 


IDSxx 


IDMxx 


IDExx 


CONTACTS TO 
20 
26 
34 

40 

50 


.82 
1.29 
1.68 
2.20 
2.58 
3.24 


.85 
1.35 
1.76 
2.31 
2.72 
3.39 


1.86 
2.98 
3.84 
4.50 
5.28 
6,63 


2.05 
3.28 
4.22 
4.45 
4.80 
7.30 


1.15 
1.S6 
2.43 
3.15 
3.73 
4.65 


5.50 
6.25 
7.00 
7.50 
8.50 


2,25 
2.36 
Z65 
3.25 
3.80 
4.74 



ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS: Insert t^ie number of contacts in the position marked "xx" of the "order by" part numberlisted. Example: A 10pin right angle solder style 
header would be 1DH10SR. 



1933 JDR MICRODEViCES, INC. 



■ APPLE IS A TRADEMARK OF APPLE COMPUTER CO. 



CIRCLE 75 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



FD-35 DISK DRIVE 

By MA Systems 

* Direct Replacement for 
Apple Disk II 

* Compatible with Apple 
Controller or other Apple 
compatible controllers 

* Specially designed electronics 
with low power consumption 

* DOS 3.3 and 3.2 compatible 

* Owner's Manual and Warranty 
Card included 

■*• 90-day Warranty 

WHoftow $22985 

OFFw 

CONTROLLER CARD ^89.95j 
APPLE II KEYBOAROm^ 

From the Keyboard Co. 

* Brand New Rev. 7 keyboard — 
NOT an imitation 

* Special Purchase — Supply 
very limited 

* Includes Encoder Board and 
Cable 

APPLE COMPATIBLE 
POWER SUPPLY S99.95 

* Compact Switching Design 

* All Outputs regulated 

* Short Circuit and Overload 
Protection 

I * Complete with Apple-type 
plug-in power cord 

* Apple Compatible — Yet higher 
output allows more disk drives 
and cards without overheating 

i* +5V@5A, +12V@3A, 

-5V@ .5A, -12V @ .5A 
I * Shielded enclosure: 10%" x 3'/;" 

X 2^16" 

VIEWMAX 80 

A Full Function 80 column card 

for Apple II* 

2 YEAR WARRANTY 



^99 



95 



NEW imPROUED 

JDR COOLING FAN 

FOR YOUR APPLE II 

* Easy modification — no 
modification of Apple required 

* Eliminates overheating 
problems 

* Switch on front controls fan. 
Apple, and extra outlet 

* Rotron whisper fan is the 
quietest, most reliable on the 
market 

NOW WITH SURGE 

SUPPRESSION 

$69.95 

L WITHOUT SURGE SUPPRESSION '59.95 J 

INTERFACE CARDS 

By Perisoft 
PRINTERLINK '79.00 

Centronics Standard Parallel 

Interface for Apple II 

Simple to use — Yet supports 

custom driver applications 

from ROM or Disk 

Includes card, cable and user's | 

manual 

1 Year Warranty 

MESSENGER '119.00 
Serial I/O for Apple II 
Connects virtually any RS-232 
serial device 
I * 6 switch selectable drivers: 

- 4 printer drivers 

- Terminal Driver — 40 or 80 
driver 

* Includes card, cable and user's I 
manual 

L * 1 Year Warranty 

^KID^^^RItTtE RS 

* 120 cps, 9x9 Dot Matrix 

* 50% faster than EPSON 
+ Parallel and Serial interfaces 

are standard 

ML-82A S47950 

ML-83A S69995 

ML-84 PARALLEL ... M 059°° 

CALL FOR PRICES ON 82A TRACTOR OPTION 
AND 82A, 83A GRAPHICS OPTION. CABLES | 
.AND INTERFACE CARDS AVAILABLE 



[JDR 16KRAMCARD 

For Apple 11* 

* Expand your 48K Apple to 64K 

* Fully compatible with Apple 
Language System — Use in 
place of Apple Language card 

* Provides extra memory for 
Visicalc^" 

* Run PASCAL, FORTRAN, 
Integer Basic with appropriate 
software 

* Highest quality card features: 
gold edge connector, sockets 
for all !C's 

NOW WITH 2 YEAR WARRANTY 



ASSEMBLED & TESTED 
WITH WARRANTY .,..,,, 

KIT - INCLUDES ALL 
PARTS & INSTRUCTIONS. 

BARE PC CARD 
.WITH INSTRUCTIONS . . . . 



$4495 

$4Q95 

$1495 



MONITORS 

GREEN PHOSPHOR 



NEC JB1201M 
I ZENITH zvM-121 

COLOR 

[AMDEK COLOR1 



s-iggoc 
$11 90c 



S335 



oc 



II 



(CALIFORNIA RESIDENTSI 



5V4 " DISKETTES 

ATHANA SSSD SOFT . . . 24.9£ 
MEMOREX SS SO SOFT 26.9! 
VERBATIM SS DD SOFT 29.9E 
VERBATIM 10 SECT HARD 29.9E 

NASHUA 

TOP QUALITY — LOW PRICE 

Single Sided, Single Density 
Soft Sectored with Hub Ring 

$19.95 BOX OF 10 



JDR Microdevices 

1224 S. Bascom Avenue 

San Jose. CA 95128 

800-538-5000 • 800-662-6279 (CA) 

(408) 995-5430* Telex 171-110 



1393 JDR MICRODEVICES, INC. 



VISIT OUR RETAIL STORE 

HOURS: M-W-R 9-5 T-Th.. 9-9 Sat. 11-3 

PLEASE USE YOUft CUSTOmEft HUMBEft WHEN ORDEfllUG 
TERMS: Fof ihJppJng Includfl %2 lor UPS Ground or S3 for UPS Blus 
UilMi Alf. It«mt ovvr 5 pound* f'qulrs iddttlonil ihtpplng chftreet, 
For*lgn orcfari Jncludt iufflclont ■ mount forfhlpplng. There ti a $10 
Rilnlmum ordtr. Bay Aro* and Lot Angelet Counllfli Add 6'4^'i Salei 
Tax. Othflf CallforntB rvildant* add 6*'b Sale* Tax. Wo r««orv« l^i 
righl to tu&ttMore manulacturvr. Not rD»ponilblv tot lypographtcal 
erron. PHcbe are lubjocl to change wllhoul notice. Wa will match or 
beat any comp^thor't price provldfld It It nol b«low our GOtl. 

* APPLE IS A THADEMARK OF APPLE COMPUTER CO. 



CIRCLE 75 ON FREE INFORMATION CARO 





^^ NEXT MONTH ^M 

^^K Don't Miss ■ 
^^^B: SPECIAL SECTION— VIDEO AND HANDHELD GAMES ■ 

^^^B THE LATEST VIDEOGAME SYSTEMS FOR 83 H 

^^^^K A look at the latest videogame consoles announced at the ^1 
^^^^K WCES show, including Intellivision II, Intellivision 111, and ^1 

^^^B COLECOVISION 1 

^^^^H, An in-depth look at the Colecovision console and H 
^^^^^K accessories, and new game cartridges. H 

^^^B GCE'S VECTREX ARCADE GAME H 

^^^^B A look at the first home videogame with a built-in CRT and ■ 
^^^^^B vector-type graphics. The discussion wili include a look at some H 
^^^^^K of the game cartridges. H 

^^^B THE ATARI 5200 SUPER GAME SYSTEM 1 

^^^^^K Atari's latest entry in the videogame market is described ■ 
^^^^H along with the game cartridges for the new system. ■ 

^^^B. STARPATH'S SUPERCHARGER 1 

^^^^^R A plug-in adaptor for Atari's 2600 console that improves the ■ 
^^^^^^B graphic H 

^^^B NEW SOFTWARE AND ADD-ONS FOR 83 1 

^^^^^H A look at the new software, keyboards and controllers for ■ 

^^^B VOICE SYNTHESIS H 

^^^^^m. Peripheral expansion devices for adding voice synthesis to H 
^^^^^^E- your videogame console. ^H 

^^^B HANDHELD AND TABLETOP ELECTRONIC GAMES ■ 

^^^^^B Small portable arcade and Chess games. ^H 


Make a move that j4 

makesyou ^^f, 

a winner!^^^ M\ 




^^^^^^^^^^K 'iJX\l < ^B <^ *'» ^^^L^ 






lC^s-^^!* ' 


^^^^^V,::>-.v:;'«.;'' .^^^^HI^H 


,^.7..^ .'f\^-.^ i v.. . "^ 




■mmm. : 


.JhI 


''^ ' ' '. ' ft^S^tfl:' --^*' = - "'."5 





CO 
o 

z 
o 

EC 

(- 
tj 

m 



a 
< 



SPARTAN 



FJi'Clronrcs inf. 



CTC9R 




$139.95 



(516) 499-9500 ^ 

6094 Jericho Tpke, 
Commack. N.Y. 11725 



Philips Remote 
Cable Converter 



« Mian KntDi/lir iKhnolOjjy • OuirU CQtVlrflHtd 

IC'S lock ni pcmrt t ptfftm dnn * ea cfunnd 

UliC^JdAfS • Prufjizmmi^ bfne on & {^tT * 2J 

>>gif r LEO i^iUl dock, • Fiydhu tiLi^nel nwH' 

vi & ttay plus ictn • w-nfeii rund ned 

iniTi-rEd IrafijrniHtr ivmm • AltloniEiC hnt 
tune ■ Mipmit Ek iny Ika^ IMinSjOn • [Me 
vur wirnnv urnet 



CABLE TV ACCESSORIES 



M«tcNng iramfsiTTwr^ 

TV ^Ama Sifftcti 

VHF UHF AMPZ8DB . 



-WAY SWITCH for 

printers, modems, 
& computers 

{RS232) 



I^Jytoo I 



$119.95 



SGL WABER 

Protect your 
computer and 
electronic equipment 
from voltage spikes 



DG115P 

DG115S 

(6 Outlet) 

H5.95 



^ 



g^^SCOTCH DISKETTES 



SV4 SSDD Soft Box 10 S29.95 
S'A DSDD Son Bo;< 10 $39.95 



REFURBISHED 
MONITORS 

9", 12", Commercial Grade 
as low as $49.95 



□c 




EPSON PRINTERS 

MX80 F/J 

with Graftrax Plus 

$529.00 



Portable IC 

Color Pattern Generator 

CftftTpacl tpr corftf r5.«n1 tuo i»ivitl use • Vtry 
ru^SH lluiriirium ana sInH ait \w ff^\HTf 
and sn.r'dirTg « Select} iiii!|h;i oti 3 crunrtd? * 
U,«i^&^ RF Dulpol inm 75 ohm hud l^r i 
snar»fl tgnif wibri *t^ TV set • HTSC Km&inaie 



iCPHmsioni 




MODEL 1210 

'135.00 



Jerrotd 36 Channel 
Remote CATV 
Converter 

w/on'off Fine Tuning $94.95 
5S Channel Wireless $109.95 




40 Cha nnel VHF to UHF 
[^.2=2 Block Converter 

~ 28.95 Ea. 
24.95 4 & up 

Del una Version - Features fine tuning knob, 
matching X former & 2 cables $3^.95 




Volume 
Discounts 

M.n Order S!5 00 



; suBietl to tiianjo 
wisiraut notice. 
COD 2 CO Eiua 

■Add I shjpping 
Im monitors 



Visa. MC, BAC Amex A'-. Add i 

COD money orosi checii 
AOd lot Stiipping: 

fo 75.x KM 

" TEOOto 2XX S450 

351 00 to SdCKI S600 

MlOOto 75000 SB50 

75100to1[«000 si?m 

twi toco 00 J1?50 



(516) 
499-9500 



MonTh 
9-8 



Tii Wf 
9-6 



ADVERTISiNG INDEX 



72 
32 
SS 
86 
79 

65 
24 

89 .&4 

5 

61 

70.71 



2.1 

82 

3S 

28 

29 

36 

)0 

21 

—.30.31 

115 

85 

57 

114 

27 

95 

97 

47 



Priorilv One 4H 

Professional Video. Inc 122 

Proteclo Knt^rrprises 39 

Radio SKack 113 

Ramse.v Eleclronics. Inc 133 

RC.4 24JI.32 

R.F. Electronics 120 

RNJ Electronics. Inc 127 

Sams Books 46.29 

Scientific .Systems 176 

SCR Eleclronics Cmtcr 116 

SEI 117 

Sencore I 

Simpte Simon Electronic 

Kits. Inc 101 

Simpson Electric Co 7 

SIntec Co 22 

.Solid State Sales 116 

Soltec 15 

Space Age Video Dist. Inc 107 

Spartan Electronics Inc 140 

SjTnmetrlc Sound Systems 103 

Sunnex Inc 103 

Tektronix 9.5 

Teltone Corp 103 

Test Probes 96 

Tiniex'Sinclair User Mag 23 

Triton Markcling Corp 3S 

Ungar 102 

Vector Electronics Co. 44 

WersI 106 

Windsor 188 

Wm, B. Allen Supply 130 



RADIO-ELECTRONICS does not assume any responsibility for errors that may appear 
In the index below. 



Free Information Number Page 

Ml Abex 102 

40 Active Electronic Sales Corp 1 19 

— .Advnnce E Icctronics 40-43 . 1 OS 

80 Advanced Computer Products 131 

73 All Electronics Corp.. 114 

9 AMC Sales 104 

14 .Appliance Service Nerfs 102 

55 AP Products 28 

92 .Arizona Electronic Surplus 120 

62 Automated Production Equipment .. !i5 

— Bay Star 32, S8 

41 Beckman Instruments. Inc 20 

78 Beta Electronics 115 

66,42 B&K Precision Dynascan Corp .. .13.56 

— CD 117 

91 Chaney Electronics Inc 137 

55 Chemtronics 98 

— CIE. Cleveland Institute of 

Electronic.;, Inc. 34-37 

96 Command Productions 107 

81 Communications Electronic.^ 2 

88 Components Express Inc 1 19 

67 Computer Products Si 

Peripherals Lnllmlted 1 1<) 

69 Concord Computer Producis 52 

13 Contact East 107 

7 Cooper Tools Cover II 

49 Diamondback 130 

3* Digi-Kcy Corporation 128-129 

87 Digitron Klectronic 127 

4 Direct Mdeo Sales 104 

99 Dokay Computer Products, Inc 123 

112.113 DX Tele-Labs 102.103 

50 Eico 105 

45 Electronic Rainbow 99 

48 Electronic Specialists 132 

— Electronic Technology Today ,. I07.10S 

25 Electronics Book Club 49 

38 Etco Electronics 121 

97 Etronix 106 

8 Firestick .Antenna Company H!M 

83 Fordham Radio S9.9I 

76 Formula International Inc 118 

— GilcD International, Inc. .,,..,..,,.... 121 
60 Gillaspie Associates Inc 27 

— Gladstone 23 

26 Global Specialties Corp 13 

98 Grantham College of Engineering .. 106 

— Graymark [20 

43 Hal-lronix 132 

16.17,18 Heath Company 25,11,45 

59 Hickok Cover III 

94 Illinois .Audio 104 

— Information Lnlimlted 130 

12 Janieco Electronics 124,125 

44 Javanco 1.32 

II Jensen Tools. Inc 102 

75 JDR Microdevtces. Inc 134-138 

100 Kalfilo Electronics Co., Die 103 

83 KCS ..,.. 122 

22 Kelthlcy 47 

74 L-Com. Inc 92 

M Leading Edge Products Cover IV 

46 MFJ EnterprLyis, Inc 116 

— MonarchyEngineering. Inc.... 121 

6 Mountain West 117 

5! Multicore 121 

84 Mullitech Electronics, Inc 51 

37 Netronics RI) Ltd 55 

90 Network Sales. Inc 127 

— Nevt Horizons 95.97 

— Nen-Tone Electronics 93 

— .VRI Schools 53 

20 OEM Distributing Co 103 

77 OK Industries Inc 85 

52 Omnitron Electronics 26 

15,19 ORA Electronics 103 

34 Pala Electronics, Inc 8S 

93 Paladin 9g 

— Philips ECG S7 

68 Ply mouth Electronics Co 132 



MOVING? I 



Don't miss a 
single copy of , 
Radlo-Elec- | 
tronlcs 



Give 



us: 



Six weeks' no- 
tice 



I 



ATTACH 
LABEL 
HERt 



Your old ad- I 
dress and zip ' 
code 



I 
I 
Your new ad- | 

dress and zip j 
code (.. 



(pie Me print) 



addraaf 



city 



stata 



zip code 



Mall to: R«<Jlo-Electronlca 

SUBSCRIPTION DEPT., P.O. BOX 2S20 

B0UU3ER, COLO. S0322 



1 40 CIRCLE 36 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



The Real World i 



Power Line Prober 



'^'i 



I 



A' 



c^: 





■>. 




^k 




>*^ 




ir field service 
engineers, continuous 
on-site monitoring . 
and alarnn \\^ 

^!]>Q^plications. 

"^ ^Rriee $239.0Q 




Hi*. 




CLEVELAND^ 

CIRCLE 59 ON FRE& INFORMATION CAftD 



i\^- 



\ 




I 



I 






' 225 Turnpike Street, Canton, Massachusetts 02021 
Toll-free: 1-800-343-6833; in Massachusetts(617) 828-8150. Telex 951-624. 

CIRCLE 33 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD